Pulse-load Tester vs Voltmeter

Lux-ury

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Dec 12, 2008
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I have a couple of ZTS pulse-load testers. They cover most of the batteries that I have. I also have a very nice digital voltmeter that measures several ways (charge, continuity, and more). I've seen quite a few mentions of the ZTS, but I can't recall anyone saying they test with a voltmeter.

My question is this: For testing batteries (both primaries and rechargables) to make sure they are properly matched, what's better? ...testing with the ZTS, or testing with the voltmeter? Or is there an advantage to using both?

I probably sound pretty ignorant. I admit I don't understand how any of this stuff works, but I try to be careful.

Anyone care to explain?

P.S. I might not see your answers until Monday because I might not be near a computer, but I will read them.
 

coppertrail

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May 21, 2006
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Best way to match is based on the capacity of the cell.

For NiMH cells, I rely on a refresh/analyze mode on the MH-C9000 to match my cells.

For other cells, if the ZTS doesn't test them, I rely on a multimeter to match.

For example, the ZTS testers don't test 3.0V RCR123A cells. The literature says it will test 3.6V RCR cells, but mentions nothing about the 3.7V cells that are abundant today.
 

leukos

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Lux-ury,

I'm pretty ignorant too, but I tend to use my voltmeter for assessing my Li-ions, and use my ZTS for everything else.
 

Lux-ury

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Dec 12, 2008
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Thanks for the reply. Some follow-up:

So I gather that if you can use either the ZTS or a multimeter, you choose the ZTS?

How long does a typical refresh/analyze cycle take on the MH-9000? Also, I read that you need to use really long keystroke combinations with it. Is that true?

Re the ZTS and 3.0V RCR123A cells, they're not there as you say, but as to 3.6 vs 3.7, I read somewhere on this forum that they are essentially the same, and I do test both with my ZTS.


Best way to match is based on the capacity of the cell.

For NiMH cells, I rely on a refresh/analyze mode on the MH-C9000 to match my cells.

For other cells, if the ZTS doesn't test them, I rely on a multimeter to match.

For example, the ZTS testers don't test 3.0V RCR123A cells. The literature says it will test 3.6V RCR cells, but mentions nothing about the 3.7V cells that are abundant today.
 
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