State of the art, today?

JackLewis

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A decade or so ago, this little light from Muyshondt was the state of the art and, in my opinion, the highest-quality light made.

It has served me well. But now I'm curious what's happening in the flashlight world — there have been lots of developments in the intervening years, naturally. So what's the equivalent, today? Or is state-of-the-art no longer necessarily linked to craft? Are the most advanced lights, like calculators, inexpensive now?

Thanks!

2A55B399-F516-4ED7-B7DB-C621AAB243D3.jpeg
 

WarriorOfLight

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Guess the question is what is for you "state of the art"? The built quality, the brightness, the small size, the runtime, ....?

I have the same light. It is really a great one.

Guess there are today a lot cool lights that are somehow "state of the art".
Only as example if brightness would the answer than state of the art is the Imalent MS18. If it is built quality and durability than maybe HDS, Surefire, Elzetta, ... If it is something between price / brightness / quality than maybe Convoy, Wurkkos, Sofirn is the answer.
 

chillinn

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But now I'm curious what's happening in the flashlight world — there have been lots of developments in the intervening years, naturally. So what's the equivalent, today?
Since then, Nichia, Cree and Osram have developed and produced high quality, high CRI LEDs in more attractive color temperatures and tints. Though manufacturers have produced drivers with better efficiency, most have not paid much attention to producing higher quality constant current drivers. One example of a maker that has paid attention to both is Hank of Noctigon/Emissar flashlights, and in particular one example of a state of the art flashlight, built with high quality materials, when customized with high quality state of the art Nichia E21A emitters will have a state of the art high efficiency constant current FET driver with two separate channels of smooth ramping capable of driving two separate pairs of LEDs with different color temperatures allowing their mixing to produce a myriad of color temperatures, is the Noctigon Ti + Cu heat sink head. And along with an optional Ti 18350 tube, you almost have the same dimensions as your Muyshondt at a fraction of the price for superior emitters with superior color rendition and superior tints and color temperatures and a far superior constant current driver (again, constant current FET is available only with combinations of E21A emitters). It's also available in Al and single channel.

Welcome to CPF, JackLewis!
 
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orbital

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+

Rotary output, always a joy to use.

Flashlights now are bright, wildly bright, super throwers, ect..
but rotary gives me a grin every time.
 

JackLewis

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Since then, Nichia, Cree and Osram have developed and produced high quality, high CRI LEDs in more attractive color temperatures and tints. Though manufacturers have produced drivers with better efficiency, most have not paid much attention to producing higher quality constant current drivers. One example of a maker that has paid attention to both is Hank of Noctigon/Emissar flashlights, and in particular one example of a state of the art flashlight, built with high quality materials, when customized with high quality state of the art Nichia E21A emitters will have a state of the art high efficiency constant current FET driver with two separate channels of smooth ramping capable of driving two separate pairs of LEDs with different color temperatures allowing their mixing to produce a myriad of color temperatures, is the Noctigon Ti + Cu heat sink head. And along with an optional Ti 18350 tube, you almost have the same dimensions as your Muyshondt at a fraction of the price for superior emitters with superior color rendition and superior tints and color temperatures and a far superior constant current driver (again, constant current FET is available only with combinations of E21A emitters). It's also available in Al and single channel.

Welcome to CPF, JackLewis!
Thanks for this! I think I'm struggling to grasp the answers here because the best lights now are apparently… shockingly inexpensive, compared to what they once were.

I like these Noctigon lights, but they do seem to bring an order of complexity that's beyond what I need. What I loved about the Muyshondt (and I understand his lights are not what they were) was the combination of small size, runtime, quality build, and simplicity: It just shot out light, at a couple of strengths.

Maybe things have advanced beyond me 😁
 

JackLewis

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Guess the question is what is for you "state of the art"? The built quality, the brightness, the small size, the runtime, ....?

I have the same light. It is really a great one.

Guess there are today a lot cool lights that are somehow "state of the art".
Only as example if brightness would the answer than state of the art is the Imalent MS18. If it is built quality and durability than maybe HDS, Surefire, Elzetta, ... If it is something between price / brightness / quality than maybe Convoy, Wurkkos, Sofirn is the answer.
Thanks for this! You nailed it — the thing I loved about this light was the intersection of "build quality, brightness, small size, runtime."

It sounds like in the years since things have sort of splintered, so that it may be hard to find the *best* example of those characteristics in one light?
 

JackLewis

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to be asked the same question three times in a row is a rare treat! yes
Sorry — I genuinely couldn't quite get your meaning. The truth is those lights are so (relatively) cheap it's hard to believe. The Zebras, I mean — I'm unsure how much the Lux-RCs cost?

(And wow — the more I read about the Lux-RCs, the more incredible they seem.)
 
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KITROBASKIN

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Difficult to acquire, built by a couple in Arkansas, the FrazLabs flashlights are without wires or electronics except for an LED and a pad with two spots of solder. QTC is used for rotary, ramping control. Not a screamer. Just a tough work horse that serves, and serves well.
 
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kerneldrop

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I have to go with Hank of Noctigon/Emissar

HDS Rotary for the most advanced American light.

I can't say enough good things about Jetbeam RRT01 Rotary.

Oveready with Lux-Rc driver has a lot of bells and whistles.

Copper and Current claim to have their own driver.

Most of the custom machined lights use others' components.
 
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chillinn

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Thanks for this! You nailed it — the thing I loved about this light was the intersection of "build quality, brightness, small size, runtime."

It sounds like in the years since things have sort of splintered, so that it may be hard to find the *best* example of those characteristics in one light?
Every option today from a quality manufacturer of a small light will have compatible build quality and superior runtime, but there is necessarily a choice between even greater brightness or superior color rendition. Due to driver efficiency increases, it is likely you can have a light just as bright or even brighter with a warmer color temperature and near perfect color rendition.

Unfortunately, I'm not familiar with the model you posted an image of nor its format. It would be helpful if you named it and told us what battery format it uses. I know Muyshondt lights used either CR2 or CR123A cells. These format lights have become less popular with the advent of higher voltage rechargeable lithium ion 16340 format and the superior capacity of slightly wider yet similarly sized 18350 cells. Also, the advent of lights just as bright or brighter driven on an inherently safe 2000+ cycle rechargeable NiMH AA cell hasn't helped the cause of CR2 or CR123A lights.

Lumintop Tool AA 2.0 Copper Nichia 219C is an example of a small light with excellent build quality that has a constant current driver with 4000K color temperature and Ra 93 high color rendition, and it is capable of 650Lm with a rechargeable Li-ion 14500 cell, but will also produce 270Lm with an NiMH AA cell and 220Lm with an common AA alkaline cell. It's a little longer than your Muyshondt, but also has a smaller diameter, is much brighter, with better efficiency at a more natural color temperature with far better color rendition for less than 40 bucks. If you are dead set on massively overpaying for light of comparable quality and less ability, you can always purchase another Muyshondt at exponentially greater cost.

But to be very clear, the finest lights first and foremost are all about the quality of the lumens themselves, not the package nor the brightness. It is about what can be seen, and we have consensus that more can be seen with less light of high color rendition than with massively more cool white light at poor color rendition. And in fact, cool white has far more of blue spectrum light in it, and blue light will slowly permanently blind the user, in fact. The best flashlights will have a constant current circuit without being laden with PWM, and it will have a warm or neutral emitter capable of near-perfect color rendition. Nearly everything over $20 has excellent build quality, so this is not rare. You'll pay more, but not too much more, for the superior heat-sinking of copper, or the attractive qualities of titanium, but with inferior heat properties.

The reason Rolex watches hold or increase their value has nothing to do with their quality; it's entirely due to their gold content. Better quality watches of better durability with superior time keeping can be had for far less than $100. But if you must wear gold, then there is only gold, and gold is only expensive because it is rare.
 
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JackLewis

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If you are dead set on massively overpaying for light of comparable quality and less ability, you can always purchase another Muyshondt at exponentially greater cost.
Ha — not at all. This information is all good, and I'm grateful. It's just difficult to catch up on a decade's worth of development.
 

badtziscool

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For me, the most radical lighting technology advancement lately would be LEP, Laser Excited Phosphor. Considering the time that Muyshondt was considered the latest and greatest, probably the best thrower out there was saabluster's DEFT lights. Now, these LEPs have nearly twice the CD and in a smaller form factor.

Now, how useful are they and whether they are better, that's purely subjective. As a flashaholic, part of my enjoyment is to shine light at objects just for the sake of it and make the light dance around. And based on that, LEPs can provide quite the entertainment value.
 
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