Stinger NiCads in cold weather?

chiphead

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
1,155
Location
Hutto,TX
I'm looking to pick a (plain)Streamlight Stinger this weekend, but winter as rolled into Austin big time. Can anyone tell how those NiCads hold up in cold weather? Better yet, why after all these years Streamlight is sticking with old NiCad chemistry?

chiphead
 

Trooper4985

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 30, 2011
Messages
6
I'm looking to pick a (plain)Streamlight Stinger this weekend, but winter as rolled into Austin big time. Can anyone tell how those NiCads hold up in cold weather? Better yet, why after all these years Streamlight is sticking with old NiCad chemistry?

chiphead

I used to carry a Stinger on my gunbelt until I switched to a Strion. I work in NY and have spent hours outside my car on search details and accidents scenes in the middle of the winter. I never had any problems with either light working in extreme cold (~10F) for extended periods. I work 12 hour shifts and have only had to pull out the trusty 4D Maglite a couple of times because my belt light died during my shift. BTW... what is your definition of "big time" winter? A low of 49 is shorts and tshirt weather... it's 20 here right now and a couple of nights ago it was 2 when I got out of work at midnight.
 

45/70

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
Messages
2,800
Location
Rural Ohio
......why after all these years Streamlight is sticking with old NiCad chemistry?

Just to address this part of your post, NiCd cells are much more durable than NiMh or Li-Ion cells. They can hold up to much more abuse, such as over discharging, reverse charging (which can occur when cells are used in series applications), and generally, are simply much more tolerant of harsh conditions whether introduced by the user, or the environment.

Also typically, a quality (think Sanyo Cadnica) NiCd cell can last 1000-2000 cycles vs. the 300-500 cycles that can be expected from NiMh or Li-Ion cells. This helps offset the disadvantage of their lower capacity, to some degree anyway.

So all in all, NiCd cells add a bit more security/stability when used in demanding situations, such as LEO, emergency, and maintenance type of work, than the other chemistry options. For this reason, I think they'll be around a bit longer in this type of use. The biggest drawback to NiCd chemistry cells is their impact on the environment, and for the most part is why they are being phased out. This could be checked by implementing stricter more efficient recycling programs, but......

Dave
 

chiphead

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
1,155
Location
Hutto,TX
I used to carry a Stinger on my gunbelt until I switched to a Strion. I work in NY and have spent hours outside my car on search details and accidents scenes in the middle of the winter. I never had any problems with either light working in extreme cold (~10F) for extended periods. I work 12 hour shifts and have only had to pull out the trusty 4D Maglite a couple of times because my belt light died during my shift. BTW... what is your definition of "big time" winter? A low of 49 is shorts and tshirt weather... it's 20 here right now and a couple of nights ago it was 2 when I got out of work at midnight.
Over the years I've become wary of battery temp ranges, I was caught short with 3 dead Tenergy 18650s during a 30~35 degree night. On another note, we here in Austin, TX are seeing (feeling) night temps in the mid-30s with no snow or ice. But understand that Austin has only two seasons, hot as hell and pretty cool.
chiphead
 

chiphead

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
1,155
Location
Hutto,TX
Just to address this part of your post, NiCd cells are much more durable than NiMh or Li-Ion cells. They can hold up to much more abuse, such as over discharging, reverse charging (which can occur when cells are used in series applications), and generally, are simply much more tolerant of harsh conditions whether introduced by the user, or the environment.

Also typically, a quality (think Sanyo Cadnica) NiCd cell can last 1000-2000 cycles vs. the 300-500 cycles that can be expected from NiMh or Li-Ion cells. This helps offset the disadvantage of their lower capacity, to some degree anyway.

So all in all, NiCd cells add a bit more security/stability when used in demanding situations, such as LEO, emergency, and maintenance type of work, than the other chemistry options. For this reason, I think they'll be around a bit longer in this type of use. The biggest drawback to NiCd chemistry cells is their impact on the environment, and for the most part is why they are being phased out. This could be checked by implementing stricter more efficient recycling programs, but......

Dave
Wow, didn't see this on the History Channel's Modern Marvels!
 
Top