Things I've learned the hard way . . .(Part 2)

KD5XB

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DM84jk
I don't recall exactly how it tasted but I seem to remember that it was odd.

There's a steakburger joint in my town that butters the bun before toasting it. I'm guessing this adds a similar type of pizazz as peanut butter.

Not even close.
 

PhotonWrangler

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I was reading an article about film processing and it reminded me of this one from a long, long time ago -

When I was in high school, back when the dinosaurs roamed, I took a photography course and wound up shooting, processing and printing my own Tri-X Pan film. It was very satisfying to see those images slowly emerge in the tray from a blank sheet of photo paper.

Anyway, this process involved some nasty chemicals. It turned out that I spent a little too much time with my right hand immersed in one of those chemicals, and I would up with a large, pus-filled blister on my thumb that lasted for a couple of weeks. I always used tongs after that.
 

Monocrom

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This is more about something that an old, former co-worker learned the hard way. This was maybe a decade ago. He had very few luxuries in life. But his ride was definitely it. Not a luxury car, but she was fully loaded. Anyway, one day he was complaining that his electronic key-fob didn't work. He was particularly angry and upset about it. More than you'd expect someone to be. I asked him why....

Turns out this had happened a few years before. And, he wasn't happy about shelling out another $300.oo (maybe more now) for a replacement fob. I asked him if his fob was damaged. Broken, missing buttons? Maybe he accidentally ran it over? Something like that? Nope!

Instead of simply replacing the battery for him, the dealership charged him for a brand new fob! Or, instead of buying an $8.oo coin-cell battery and doing the job himself, he went to the dealership that blatantly cheated him! Thing is, being an older guy who never owned a car before with an electronic fob, he was literally just ignorant about how they worked. Not his fault. He just didn't know.

For some odd reason, when he bought the car, the dealership handed him only the one fob. (He bought it Pre-Owned.) They promised him another fob but never delivered. Thankfully he did have enough good sense to go get a physical key made from the one switch-blade key-fob they gave him. I told him that he didn't need to spend $300.oo on a new fob. I explained why. He seemed to get angrier. Though not with me. He didn't completely believe me though. Next day, he shows up with both keys. I take the dead fob, and using a flat-head driver on my multi-tool, along with the blade feature; I pop open the fob. Drop the dead battery into my hand. He leaves the fob with me.

Next day, I come back with the dead battery along with a new one still in its packaging. Along with his fob. I open up the fob again, take out the new battery from its packaging. Insert it. Close up the fob. And, hand it back to him. He hesitates.... until he goes outside and tries it out. He thanks me for my help. He tries to pay me back for battery, I tell him to buy me lunch; and we're good. Yes, I felt sorry for him. No clue if he ever confronted the dealership for blatantly cheating him out of his money. Though I did learn a couple of years later that it did go out of business. Quite frankly, good riddance.
 

PhotonWrangler

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This is more about something that an old, former co-worker learned the hard way. This was maybe a decade ago. He had very few luxuries in life. But his ride was definitely it. Not a luxury car, but she was fully loaded. Anyway, one day he was complaining that his electronic key-fob didn't work. He was particularly angry and upset about it. More than you'd expect someone to be. I asked him why....

Turns out this had happened a few years before. And, he wasn't happy about shelling out another $300.oo (maybe more now) for a replacement fob. I asked him if his fob was damaged. Broken, missing buttons? Maybe he accidentally ran it over? Something like that? Nope!

Instead of simply replacing the battery for him, the dealership charged him for a brand new fob! Or, instead of buying an $8.oo coin-cell battery and doing the job himself, he went to the dealership that blatantly cheated him! Thing is, being an older guy who never owned a car before with an electronic fob, he was literally just ignorant about how they worked. Not his fault. He just didn't know.

For some odd reason, when he bought the car, the dealership handed him only the one fob. (He bought it Pre-Owned.) They promised him another fob but never delivered. Thankfully he did have enough good sense to go get a physical key made from the one switch-blade key-fob they gave him. I told him that he didn't need to spend $300.oo on a new fob. I explained why. He seemed to get angrier. Though not with me. He didn't completely believe me though. Next day, he shows up with both keys. I take the dead fob, and using a flat-head driver on my multi-tool, along with the blade feature; I pop open the fob. Drop the dead battery into my hand. He leaves the fob with me.

Next day, I come back with the dead battery along with a new one still in its packaging. Along with his fob. I open up the fob again, take out the new battery from its packaging. Insert it. Close up the fob. And, hand it back to him. He hesitates.... until he goes outside and tries it out. He thanks me for my help. He tries to pay me back for battery, I tell him to buy me lunch; and we're good. Yes, I felt sorry for him. No clue if he ever confronted the dealership for blatantly cheating him out of his money. Though I did learn a couple of years later that it did go out of business. Quite frankly, good riddance.
Good for you for helping him out. And that dealership... yeah, good riddance to those weasels. :mad:
 

raggie33

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once i while useing my convertible ladder you know the kind that can convert from step ladder to a normal straight ladder. well i wasnt paying attn and had it slam on hand when i was taking it down. well next time i thought to self i wont let that happen again. so i moved hands way out of the way.. a course its falls right on my foot lol. so pretty much i was outsmarted by a ladder twice
 

PhotonWrangler

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once i while useing my convertible ladder you know the kind that can convert from step ladder to a normal straight ladder. well i wasnt paying attn and had it slam on hand when i was taking it down. well next time i thought to self i wont let that happen again. so i moved hands way out of the way.. a course its falls right on my foot lol. so pretty much i was outsmarted by a ladder twice
Ouch! How embarrassing. I don't trust those convertible ladders.
 

raggie33

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lol they kind of suck ill be useing it again this and next week i got 6 100 watts solar panels comeing btw man solar panels got so cheap lol. if all goes well ill be able to at least run my ac unit for free this summer with my other 5 panels
 

Monocrom

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Folding ladder and a separate straight ladder for me.
Though I'll only go up a folding ladder that has about three steps on one side. That's good enough for me. If you fall, it hurts less if you're a lot closer to the ground. Though I didn't learn that lesson the hard way.
 

PhotonWrangler

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Folding ladder and a separate straight ladder for me.
Though I'll only go up a folding ladder that has about three steps on one side. That's good enough for me. If you fall, it hurts less if you're a lot closer to the ground. Though I didn't learn that lesson the hard way.
Just when you least expect it, gravity shows up.
 

ghostguy6

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This is more about something that an old, former co-worker learned the hard way. This was maybe a decade ago. He had very few luxuries in life. But his ride was definitely it. Not a luxury car, but she was fully loaded. Anyway, one day he was complaining that his electronic key-fob didn't work. He was particularly angry and upset about it. More than you'd expect someone to be. I asked him why....

Turns out this had happened a few years before. And, he wasn't happy about shelling out another $300.oo (maybe more now) for a replacement fob. I asked him if his fob was damaged. Broken, missing buttons? Maybe he accidentally ran it over? Something like that? Nope!

Instead of simply replacing the battery for him, the dealership charged him for a brand new fob! Or, instead of buying an $8.oo coin-cell battery and doing the job himself, he went to the dealership that blatantly cheated him! Thing is, being an older guy who never owned a car before with an electronic fob, he was literally just ignorant about how they worked. Not his fault. He just didn't know.

For some odd reason, when he bought the car, the dealership handed him only the one fob. (He bought it Pre-Owned.) They promised him another fob but never delivered. Thankfully he did have enough good sense to go get a physical key made from the one switch-blade key-fob they gave him. I told him that he didn't need to spend $300.oo on a new fob. I explained why. He seemed to get angrier. Though not with me. He didn't completely believe me though. Next day, he shows up with both keys. I take the dead fob, and using a flat-head driver on my multi-tool, along with the blade feature; I pop open the fob. Drop the dead battery into my hand. He leaves the fob with me.

Next day, I come back with the dead battery along with a new one still in its packaging. Along with his fob. I open up the fob again, take out the new battery from its packaging. Insert it. Close up the fob. And, hand it back to him. He hesitates.... until he goes outside and tries it out. He thanks me for my help. He tries to pay me back for battery, I tell him to buy me lunch; and we're good. Yes, I felt sorry for him. No clue if he ever confronted the dealership for blatantly cheating him out of his money. Though I did learn a couple of years later that it did go out of business. Quite frankly, good riddance.
I spent about a year working at a tire / mechanics shop and we would get 2 or 3 vehicles towed in every month. The complaint was always automatic doors wouldn't work and the engine wouldn't start. It sure made people mad when we told them they paid for a tow truck when the battery was less than $10.
There was an honest tow truck operator around here that used to keep a selection of coin cells in his truck for just such clients. One day I asked him how many calls he got about the dead fobs and his answer was at least one a day. He was one of the busiest drivers I have ever met. Too bad hes now retired.
 

Monocrom

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One a day? Lucky for those customers that he was honest. Could have made himself a small fortune just towing their vehicles alone. I recently replaced the battery in one of my fobs, and it reminded me of that old co-worker.
 

KITROBASKIN

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"Intelligent people are often open to new ideas and perspectives. They don't cling stubbornly to their beliefs, but are willing to consider other viewpoints and adjust their thinking when presented with new information.

They understand that the world is complex and multifaceted, and they're not afraid to challenge their own assumptions and beliefs."
 
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