Voltage

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3mw

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I just received a new light (package sealed) today and I checked the CR123 cells with a voltmeter and I got a reading of 3.02V each, I then checked the free batteries that were included and I got a reading of 3.30V. Is this considered a good amount of battery loss when dealing with CR123 cells? I know when comparing a 1.5V alkaline to a 1.2V alkaline it makes a BIG difference. Thanks
 
65535

65535

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I hope you mean that the cell was at 2.3 volts, but I don't entirely understand what you are saying. Do the cells that came with the light have 2.3 volts or am I as confused as I think I am?

2.3 volts is practically dead, depending on who makes the light and where you bought it, they may make it right.
 
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VidPro

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I just received a new light (package sealed) today and I checked the CR123 cells with a voltmeter and I got a reading of 3.02V each, I then checked the free batteries that were included and I got a reading of 3.30V. Is this considered a good amount of battery loss when dealing with CR123 cells? I know when comparing a 1.5V alkaline to a 1.2V alkaline it makes a BIG difference. Thanks

no way to tell. see these charts
https://www.candlepowerforums.com/threads/67078
(that is under a load)

the 3V lithium (not li-ion) cells will show about 3.3V Unloaded , fresh new. but one could still show 3.02 like your saying and be 90% usable.
you would really need to test under a Load to know anything about how much capacity is in the cell, and even then it would be just a fair guess. different batteries from different brands and different age will act different.

to test under a load, you put some resistance across your voltmeter leads, then test the battery, and see how badly it saggs down, this will consume some of its capacity to test. then you use what you learn from doing that, to other batteries of known capacity, to get a fair idea of about where this one is at.

you could guess that the 3.3v battery is totally fresh and unused, and that the 3.0 battery has been used, or might be weak, but it would only be guessing. if you use the same battery types/brands/age, and start looking at them more often you will be a good guesser, just like your a good guesser with alkalines.

and example of this , is a battery that was very low looking in voltage, it was loaded, it went up for a while, then took the standard path of decline. the battery was still a very good battery, it just reacted different at first. (if i knew where the thread was, i would link to it)
 
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coppertrail

coppertrail

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I have some Titanium CR123A cells purchased in December which are showing resting voltages all over the place. I'm very disappointed as Lithium cells are supposed to have a very low self-discharge rate. At this point, I can simply use them in a single cell light or match them using a ZTS tester to be used in a 2-cell light.

I wouldn't say 3.02V is terrible, some of mine were showing voltages in the 2.8-2.9 voltage range after sitting in cold storge for 8 mo.
 
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VidPro

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they might not be "self discharging" as much as just acting inactive.
there was a post long ago, where a certian groups of lithium cells were reading low, and they "woke up" really quick when under load.

they probably fix em, by just waking them up before sending them , i donno for sure. but unless they are junk, they should be just fine.
just like a tarantula , itll be moving really slow, till you touch it :)
 

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