123's in fridge in original package?

nitebrite

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hi,

if you put 123's in the fridge in original package do you have to worry about condensation?

i have stored alk's for years in original package in fridge. 123's any different?

thanks,
nitebrite
 

Mr Happy

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There are some myths about refrigeration.

Firstly, "condensation" doesn't actually happen inside a fridge. The inside of a fridge is actually drier than the room it is in.

However, when you take something out of the cold, dry fridge into the warm, moist room air, condensation then starts immediately.

So what you should do to keep things dry in the fridge is first put them in the fridge to cool down in an open and unsealed bag or other container. Once the item and container has reached equilibrium with the inside of the fridge (e.g. overnight), then you should seal the bag or container as quickly as possible while keeping it inside the fridge. This will seal the dry fridge air inside the container.

When eventually you remove the item from the fridge for use, you should allow it to reach room temperature before opening the bag. Otherwise the cold item will get condensation on it as it contacts the outside air.
 

Closet_Flashaholic

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I usually just put them in a "freezer" ziplock bag with 2 (small) packs of dessicant, compressing the bag as much a possible (to remove air) and then put that bag in another bag. I use the "freezer" bags just because they are thicker and a little more durable.

Putting them in a bag while actually in the refrigerator sounds like a good idea too.

I have been storing batteries in the fridge since the '80's ever since my friend's late dad (a chemist) let me in on the "secret"... :)
 

nitebrite

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i have been storing alk's in the fridge in their original package for many years with no bad results. i didn't know if i could expect different results with lith primaries.

why exactly is condensation bad for batteries? they could short? i'd imagine that any condensation is minimal and dissipatates too quickly once in the room to cause a problem.

everything says to do what you guys have suggested. i guess i have just been lucky so far.

thanks,
nitebrite
 

Mr Happy

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I don't think condensation is that bad for batteries, by and large. Might cause a bit of rust is all. Most kinds of battery have a fully sealed case so any condensation that does form will be confined to the outside anyway.

It's camera film that is probably much more sensitive, but there is no so much of that around these days.
 

drmaxx

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There are some myths about refrigeration.

Firstly, "condensation" doesn't actually happen inside a fridge. The inside of a fridge is actually drier than the room it is in.

Don't forget that a normal fridge has quite an influx of warm more or less moiste aire by opening the door. Depending on the use this can be quite significant. See freezer where the ice accumulates on the walls over time.
 

MorePower

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hi,

if you put 123's in the fridge in original package do you have to worry about condensation?

i have stored alk's for years in original package in fridge. 123's any different?

thanks,
nitebrite

There's no reason to store CR123 or alkaline cells in a fridge, unless you don't plan to use them for several years.

Self-discharge of primary lithium-manganese dioxide cells is negligible at normal room temperature, and alkaline cells should maintain over 90% of their original capacity when stored at room temperature for 3 or 4 years.

Closet_Flashaholic said:
I have been storing batteries in the fridge since the '80's ever since my friend's late dad (a chemist) let me in on the "secret"... :)

He was probably basing his "secret" on the Arrhenius equation, which isn't entirely applicable to alkaline batteries due to their construction and the types of reactions that occur during undischarged storage.

You may maintain a few extra percent of performance over several years versus room temperature storage, but in reality, you'd have been better off not buying as many cells to begin with, as primary cell performance will improve year after year based on improved cell design.
 

etc

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Best temperature for storing 123s?

Does it make sense to store 123 cells in an unheated garage. Right now it's most likely below 30 in there.

The same question about L91s, alks (in all sizes)..
 
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