Haiku Hive default voltage

ilikeguns40

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I currently purchased a 3v HIVE haiku on a cr123 body. I have a couple questions regarding battery if anyone can help. I plan on leaving this at the default setup without going into the advanced programming. Is the default mode for use on CR123 primaries, li-ion 16340s, or both? Don had told me to use protected 16340s and I’m reading CR123s will also work. Just need some info here regarding the best option
 

F89

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I don’t currently have a Hive, had one though.
From memory it’s set to li-ion of which there are two settings. I’d have to look at the manual again but I remember there being around four voltage settings, two li-ion, a CR123 and a 2xAA NiMH.
You can use any battery configuration with any of the settings but you’ll notice that some are (obviously) more suitable than others regarding when the light employs the low voltage step down.
I played around a fair bit and, again from memory, liked using the CR123 setting for li-ion and CR123. Something like that anyway? I did try all the battery and fold back configurations and check what worked best but I can’t remember the details.
Long story short; they come set to one of the li-ion settings with four modes (max of 1A). Using a CR123 you’ll get about ~900mA on high (even though it’s set at 1A).
I’d recommend soldering the jumper and unlocking customisation and while I’d admit that the programming seems a bit complicated, it’s really not that hard if you play around and well worth accessing the extensive customisation features.
Not sure if my ramblings have helped much. Have a read of the manual and give it a crack.
 

ilikeguns40

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I don’t currently have a Hive, had one though.
From memory it’s set to li-ion of which there are two settings. I’d have to look at the manual again but I remember there being around four voltage settings, two li-ion, a CR123 and a 2xAA NiMH.
You can use any battery configuration with any of the settings but you’ll notice that some are (obviously) more suitable than others regarding when the light employs the low voltage step down.
I played around a fair bit and, again from memory, liked using the CR123 setting for li-ion and CR123. Something like that anyway? I did try all the battery and fold back configurations and check what worked best but I can’t remember the details.
Long story short; they come set to one of the li-ion settings with four modes (max of 1A). Using a CR123 you’ll get about ~900mA on high (even though it’s set at 1A).
I’d recommend soldering the jumper and unlocking customisation and while I’d admit that the programming seems a bit complicated, it’s really not that hard if you play around and well worth accessing the extensive customisation features.
Not sure if my ramblings have helped much. Have a read of the manual and give it a crack.
Thanks for info and I do plan on soldering the jumper whenever I can get access to a soldering iron. I don’t have one. I just have a huge pile of Surefire cr123s I’d like to use and just wondered if the stock is set up for cr123 or 3.7v lithium ion. If it’s setup for 3.7 volt and I’m using cr123 primary is there gonna be an issue? Or is my high output gonna suffer and curious how the low voltage protection will work. I had just ordered three orbtronic 16340s so they should be in Wednesday
 

ilikeguns40

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I don’t currently have a Hive, had one though.
From memory it’s set to li-ion of which there are two settings. I’d have to look at the manual again but I remember there being around four voltage settings, two li-ion, a CR123 and a 2xAA NiMH.
You can use any battery configuration with any of the settings but you’ll notice that some are (obviously) more suitable than others regarding when the light employs the low voltage step down.
I played around a fair bit and, again from memory, liked using the CR123 setting for li-ion and CR123. Something like that anyway? I did try all the battery and fold back configurations and check what worked best but I can’t remember the details.
Long story short; they come set to one of the li-ion settings with four modes (max of 1A). Using a CR123 you’ll get about ~900mA on high (even though it’s set at 1A).
I’d recommend soldering the jumper and unlocking customisation and while I’d admit that the programming seems a bit complicated, it’s really not that hard if you play around and well worth accessing the extensive customisation features.
Not sure if my ramblings have helped much. Have a read of the manual and give it a crack.
Sorry I re read your reply and it made better sense. I had just woke up haha. I plan on using the hive programming for sure but the instructions are very overwhelming. I kind of get the sequence but I need to physically play around with it to get the idea of how it works
 

F89

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You can also tape a tiny bit of aluminium foil or use a lead pencil etc to make the jumper work but soldering is best.
Yes, your CR123 will work but you can get more out of them with other programs. There’ll be no major issues.
It may take a little practice and possibly some re-reading of the manual but you’ll get the hang of it.
 

Jfowler

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The default on the HIVE is for lithium primary cells (see cheat sheet below). Any cell can be used with this default, but if you are going to use rechargeable, it’s wise to switch to one of the settings that indicate when voltage is getting low.


Also, if you have a mechanical pencil laying around, you can just scribble some graphite between the two solder pads. It worked for me on 3 different HIVE drivers. If you try the graphite trick and can’t access programming, I can pretty much guarantee your “toggle” sequence is incorrect. Feel free to shoot me a message if you need help with your HIVE.
 

F89

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I was too lazy to go to the Hive thread before and download the manual again. And yes, the default is set for CR123. First step down 2.5V, second 2V. While it sounds like it won’t function well with 16340, in practice I don’t think you’ll find the battery protection circuit kick in before the step down, that’s how I remember it anyway.
I remember not liking the li-ion settings (when using 16340) as I felt it was stepping down prematurely (could have been the batteries I used at the time?).
 

ilikeguns40

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The default on the HIVE is for lithium primary cells (see cheat sheet below). Any cell can be used with this default, but if you are going to use rechargeable, it’s wise to switch to one of the settings that indicate when voltage is getting low.


Also, if you have a mechanical pencil laying around, you can just scribble some graphite between the two solder pads. It worked for me on 3 different HIVE drivers. If you try the graphite trick and can’t access programming, I can pretty much guarantee your “toggle” sequence is incorrect. Feel free to shoot me a message if you need help with your HIVE.
I might try that today. Once I close the gap and turn the light on is it now in full programming mode? Or do I have to do the initial toggle first to unlock it?
 

Jfowler

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Closing the gap allows you the ability to toggle into programming. If I recall, Don asked for the gap as a way to keep people from accidentally entering programming through a series of unfortunate clicks.
 

ilikeguns40

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Gotcha. Before I dive into this just a few questions before I start. On that diagram, the left side where it shows setup level 1. It shows 1-6. When I first go into programming after my initial toggle do the 1-6 numbers represent the amount of blinks per say? So I will click off after two blinks to enter operation mode?
 

ilikeguns40

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The default on the HIVE is for lithium primary cells (see cheat sheet below). Any cell can be used with this default, but if you are going to use rechargeable, it’s wise to switch to one of the settings that indicate when voltage is getting low.


Also, if you have a mechanical pencil laying around, you can just scribble some graphite between the two solder pads. It worked for me on 3 different HIVE drivers. If you try the graphite trick and can’t access programming, I can pretty much guarantee your “toggle” sequence is incorrect. Feel free to shoot me a message if you need help with your HIVE.
I have used a pencil several times and even taped a tiny piece of aluminum to close the jumper. I cannot for the life of me to get into programming mode. 2 long toggle-4 short-2 long. I did this all in momentary and full press and nothing
 

Jfowler

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1-6 on the left side of the chart are the basic programming groups. As you work through those groups, you set number of levels, mode memory, battery optimization, etc. The selection you make on group 5 (yes/no) will decide if you exit programming, or expand programming to all of those selections in the right side of the chart. The things I played with on the right side could be dropping the power level on your lowest out put setting to the lowest moonlight possible, or increasing the max current to 1200 mA to get the highest high possible.

My suggestion is to work on the toggle sequence and become proficient at just getting into the programming menu. Once in, rapid click your way out of it (just flash the light 6 or 7 times) and try again. Reason being, it would be frustrating to get into programming once, make some unexpected changes, and then having a tough time getting back in to reverse those changes.
 

ilikeguns40

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1-6 on the left side of the chart are the basic programming groups. As you work through those groups, you set number of levels, mode memory, battery optimization, etc. The selection you make on group 5 (yes/no) will decide if you exit programming, or expand programming to all of those selections in the right side of the chart. The things I played with on the right side could be dropping the power level on your lowest out put setting to the lowest moonlight possible, or increasing the max current to 1200 mA to get the highest high possible.

My suggestion is to work on the toggle sequence and become proficient at just getting into the programming menu. Once in, rapid click your way out of it (just flash the light 6 or 7 times) and try again. Reason being, it would be frustrating to get into programming once, make some unexpected changes, and then having a tough time getting back in to reverse those changes.
I’ll keep trying. I don’t know what I’m doing wrong with the sequence. It seems to be pretty easy haha. These are all momentary toggles correct? No full press toggles?
 

ilikeguns40

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1-6 on the left side of the chart are the basic programming groups. As you work through those groups, you set number of levels, mode memory, battery optimization, etc. The selection you make on group 5 (yes/no) will decide if you exit programming, or expand programming to all of those selections in the right side of the chart. The things I played with on the right side could be dropping the power level on your lowest out put setting to the lowest moonlight possible, or increasing the max current to 1200 mA to get the highest high possible.

My suggestion is to work on the toggle sequence and become proficient at just getting into the programming menu. Once in, rapid click your way out of it (just flash the light 6 or 7 times) and try again. Reason being, it would be frustrating to get into programming once, make some unexpected changes, and then having a tough time getting back in to reverse those changes.
 

Jfowler

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I have used a pencil several times and even taped a tiny piece of aluminum to close the jumper. I cannot for the life of me to get into programming mode. 2 long toggle-4 short-2 long. I did this all in momentary and full press and nothing
It’s not really 2-4-2. That is a poor descriptor.

I am going to use the terms “tap”, “pause”, and “hold”.

While you are programming, NEVER click/press the switch hard enough to latch it to a full on position. The “tap” is just a hard enough press to give you a momentary flash of light. So when you “tap”, the light flashes and you release completely. A “pause” is a long enough off period that the second “tap” does not go to the next output level, but rather comes back on in the lowest level (or whatever level you started in if your light has memory enabled). A pause is maybe 1.5 seconds. A “hold” would be a tap that maintains momentary on, but does not go so far as to latch the clicky switch. So a hold is just what you do if you pressed the button enough to keep the light on, but it would go off if you let go. So with that out of the way…

The sequence would better be described as 2-5-2

From off:

Tap, Pause, Tap, Pause, Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap, Pause
Tap, Pause, Tap+Hold

Do not let go of your Hold!

When you hold, you will see a strobe/flash, then a series of slow blinks, then a series of faster blinks, then another strobe/flash, then a high out put, then a low out put. Then the light will turn off.

If you tap+hold again, it will repeat the same sequence. It will continue the exact same sequence every time you tap+hold. During this time, you are in programming level 1.

If you “tap” one time (not a tap+hold), and do not let the sequence complete, you advanced to level 2. Another tap will go to level 3, and so on until you run out of programming groups.

So if you stayed in programming group 2, you will now see those same flashes/strobes, followed by a different series of slow blinks and fast blinks, then the strobe, then the high, then the low, then off.

I’d wager you will see the strobe, then 2 blinks, then 1 blink again, then strobe, then high, then low. Those first 2 blinks identify the mode group you are working in (group 2). That second single blink tells you the current setting of that mode group (in this case, setting 1- persistent). That high and low you see after the second strobe are your opportunities to go up one setting (release your hold during the “high”) or down one setting (release your hold during the low). You can only go one step at a time.

While in programming, a series of rapid taps after a sequence will exit programming menu.
 

Jfowler

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This is the sequence on video. Again, there are 5 rapid flashes in the middle, and that last one is a tap+hold.

(I am not using a HIVE driver, but your driver will flash if you do it the same way)

 

ilikeguns40

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It’s not really 2-4-2. That is a poor descriptor.

I am going to use the terms “tap”, “pause”, and “hold”.

While you are programming, NEVER click/press the switch hard enough to latch it to a full on position. The “tap” is just a hard enough press to give you a momentary flash of light. So when you “tap”, the light flashes and you release completely. A “pause” is a long enough off period that the second “tap” does not go to the next output level, but rather comes back on in the lowest level (or whatever level you started in if your light has memory enabled). A pause is maybe 1.5 seconds. A “hold” would be a tap that maintains momentary on, but does not go so far as to latch the clicky switch. So a hold is just what you do if you pressed the button enough to keep the light on, but it would go off if you let go. So with that out of the way…

The sequence would better be described as 2-5-2

From off:

Tap, Pause, Tap, Pause, Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap, Pause
Tap, Pause, Tap+Hold

Do not let go of your Hold!

When you hold, you will see a strobe/flash, then a series of slow blinks, then a series of faster blinks, then another strobe/flash, then a high out put, then a low out put. Then the light will turn off.

If you tap+hold again, it will repeat the same sequence. It will continue the exact same sequence every time you tap+hold. During this time, you are in programming level 1.

If you “tap” one time (not a tap+hold), and do not let the sequence complete, you advanced to level 2. Another tap will go to level 3, and so on until you run out of programming groups.

So if you stayed in programming group 2, you will now see those same flashes/strobes, followed by a different series of slow blinks and fast blinks, then the strobe, then the high, then the low, then off.

I’d wager you will see the strobe, then 2 blinks, then 1 blink again, then strobe, then high, then low. Those first 2 blinks identify the mode group you are working in (group 2). That second single blink tells you the current setting of that mode group (in this case, setting 1- persistent). That high and low you see after the second strobe are your opportunities to go up one setting (release your hold during the “high”) or down one setting (release your hold during the low). You can only go one step at a time.

While in programming, a series of rapid taps after a sequence will exit programming menu.
Holy poop I got it! That makes much more sense the way you described
 

ilikeguns40

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Holy poop I got it! That makes much more sense the way you described
Meant to say the other word
It’s not really 2-4-2. That is a poor descriptor.

I am going to use the terms “tap”, “pause”, and “hold”.

While you are programming, NEVER click/press the switch hard enough to latch it to a full on position. The “tap” is just a hard enough press to give you a momentary flash of light. So when you “tap”, the light flashes and you release completely. A “pause” is a long enough off period that the second “tap” does not go to the next output level, but rather comes back on in the lowest level (or whatever level you started in if your light has memory enabled). A pause is maybe 1.5 seconds. A “hold” would be a tap that maintains momentary on, but does not go so far as to latch the clicky switch. So a hold is just what you do if you pressed the button enough to keep the light on, but it would go off if you let go. So with that out of the way…

The sequence would better be described as 2-5-2

From off:

Tap, Pause, Tap, Pause, Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap, Pause
Tap, Pause, Tap+Hold

Do not let go of your Hold!

When you hold, you will see a strobe/flash, then a series of slow blinks, then a series of faster blinks, then another strobe/flash, then a high out put, then a low out put. Then the light will turn off.

If you tap+hold again, it will repeat the same sequence. It will continue the exact same sequence every time you tap+hold. During this time, you are in programming level 1.

If you “tap” one time (not a tap+hold), and do not let the sequence complete, you advanced to level 2. Another tap will go to level 3, and so on until you run out of programming groups.

So if you stayed in programming group 2, you will now see those same flashes/strobes, followed by a different series of slow blinks and fast blinks, then the strobe, then the high, then the low, then off.

I’d wager you will see the strobe, then 2 blinks, then 1 blink again, then strobe, then high, then low. Those first 2 blinks identify the mode group you are working in (group 2). That second single blink tells you the current setting of that mode group (in this case, setting 1- persistent). That high and low you see after the second strobe are your opportunities to go up one setting (release your hold during the “high”) or down one setting (release your hold during the low). You can only go one step at a time.

While in programming, a series of rapid taps after a sequence will exit programming menu.
meant to say the S word haha but anyway I got it and the way you described was so much better. Now the fun begins.

Now that I unlocked the setup the default is set to cr123 primary correct?
 

ilikeguns40

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It’s not really 2-4-2. That is a poor descriptor.

I am going to use the terms “tap”, “pause”, and “hold”.

While you are programming, NEVER click/press the switch hard enough to latch it to a full on position. The “tap” is just a hard enough press to give you a momentary flash of light. So when you “tap”, the light flashes and you release completely. A “pause” is a long enough off period that the second “tap” does not go to the next output level, but rather comes back on in the lowest level (or whatever level you started in if your light has memory enabled). A pause is maybe 1.5 seconds. A “hold” would be a tap that maintains momentary on, but does not go so far as to latch the clicky switch. So a hold is just what you do if you pressed the button enough to keep the light on, but it would go off if you let go. So with that out of the way…

The sequence would better be described as 2-5-2

From off:

Tap, Pause, Tap, Pause, Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap,Tap, Pause
Tap, Pause, Tap+Hold

Do not let go of your Hold!

When you hold, you will see a strobe/flash, then a series of slow blinks, then a series of faster blinks, then another strobe/flash, then a high out put, then a low out put. Then the light will turn off.

If you tap+hold again, it will repeat the same sequence. It will continue the exact same sequence every time you tap+hold. During this time, you are in programming level 1.

If you “tap” one time (not a tap+hold), and do not let the sequence complete, you advanced to level 2. Another tap will go to level 3, and so on until you run out of programming groups.

So if you stayed in programming group 2, you will now see those same flashes/strobes, followed by a different series of slow blinks and fast blinks, then the strobe, then the high, then the low, then off.

I’d wager you will see the strobe, then 2 blinks, then 1 blink again, then strobe, then high, then low. Those first 2 blinks identify the mode group you are working in (group 2). That second single blink tells you the current setting of that mode group (in this case, setting 1- persistent). That high and low you see after the second strobe are your opportunities to go up one setting (release your hold during the “high”) or down one setting (release your hold during the low). You can only go one step at a time.

While in programming, a series of rapid taps after a sequence will exit programming menu.
I appreciate your help big time. Thanks again. I’m gonna mess with these modes and so on and try some basic things. If I have any questions I’ll send you a message if you don’t mind
 
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