help me choose a watch

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Aug 11, 2003
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anyone who knows me i dont care about looks matter fact i hate shiney watches but i want it to be very acurate but dont want the kind that needs that atomic clock link ups
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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is it the one with that cool blue light? or green i forget but i i recall it looking cool
 

Olumin

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Radio controlled watches also keep time independently from the atomic clock since they are also quartz movements. The grade of quartz is often lower in these watches since it doesn't need to be as accurate as regular movements, but even those watches should be in the realm of 0.1 sec a day. That's accurate enough for most people.

The most accurate quartz watches are temperature compensated & certified as chronometers. Such watches may keep time within 10 seconds a year or even less.

From experience I would recommend avoiding solar powered watches like Eco-drive models, since even those will require replacement capacitors. They may run up to 10 years but eventually wont hold a charge. A certified watchmaker will often charge easily 5-10 times the price of a normal battery replacement for replacing the capacitor in a solar powered watch & often small independent watchmakers aren't able to get the parts. On the other hand normal battery changes can be performed even by a novice at home with the right tools.

Depending on what you are willing to spend, there are many solid affordable (as well as high-end) offerings from Citizen, Casio & Seiko that will keep excellent time. From there you may look into ETA quartz movements, as those are very well engineered & fully serviceable (which many Japanese movements are not) with parts readily available to every watchmaker.
But even the Japanese movements will often last you decades.

Being a watchmaker myself I am predictably biased towards analoge watches, since models with digital electronic displays are largely unserviceable (often the case cant even be opened), but they wont keep any worse time. Due to the power requirements of those LCDs however, as well as many extra functions & back lighting often packed into those watches, the battery usually wont last as long as on analoge models.
 
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Monocrom

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Any specific criteria?

Otherwise for accuracy, reliability, toughness, price, and not having to deal with a dead battery.... Any solar-powered G-Shock is going to be an excellent choice, overall. For thinness and a bit of price savings (assuming you're not looking for a model with a giant list of complications), GWM5610-1.
 

Olumin

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Its hard to recommend anything specific. Its really down to preference & since watches now more then ever are really more jewelry then anything else, aesthetics take president. Any quartz watch will keep decent time. Whats your budget & what complications are you looking for? Size? Analogue or digital? Case material? Strap or metal bracelet?
 

orbital

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Another vote for G-Shock
DW5600E-1V available from Walmart.com for $38.69

(shipped & sold by Walmart)
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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i have a casio solar is mine ok it has hands and digital read out was 28 bucks
 

Monocrom

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I'm less inclined nowadays to recommend traditional quartz watches. As quite a few soldiers found out in the Middle East, when the battery dies; you might as well chuck that traditional quartz watch into the sand. Even outside of a war zone, it's can be a pain to drive out of your way to visit the nearest independent watchmaker for a battery change. With Covid still around, if that nearest watchmaker has a shop or kiosk inside a mall.... seems silly risking possible infection just for a watch battery.

Another good choice, sorry for not realizing this earlier, would be Citizen's line of Eco-Drive models. Solar-powered, long-lasting battery. These typically run anywhere from 10 - 20 years before needing the special battery inside replaced. (Which can be a huge hassle.) But again, 10 - 20 years before that becomes an issue. Some last even longer.

My most worn watch is my Citizen BM7080-03E with a titanium case that looks as good as new from about 20 years ago. I think Citizen still sells that model. Just a good-looking watch that can fit in, in more formal occasions. Plus, easily recharged using artificial light from a flashlight. Full charge = 6 months of use.
 

Poppy

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iPhone 13

It is the swiss army knife of watches:
It plays music, give directions, locates you if you are lost, finds recipes, takes pictures, links to Amazon, and best of all, has a flashlight!

You can verbally ask it what time it is, and it will TELL you. It will also give you your local weather report, just for the asking.
 

Burgess

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Apr 10, 2006
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Any specific criteria?

Otherwise for accuracy, reliability, toughness, price, and not having to deal with a dead battery.... Any solar-powered G-Shock is going to be an excellent choice, overall. For thinness and a bit of price savings (assuming you're not looking for a model with a giant list of complications), GWM5610-1.
I totally agree with Monocrom's statement above.

I've been using this Casio model for years,
and LOVE it !
 
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