Methods of Bezel Removals

matt304

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Sep 28, 2006
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The common small bezels found on a lot of hosts, that are typically stainless steel, thin ring at the very front of the main bezel, are those typically glued, pressed, or threaded in? For instance, check out something like an Ultrafire M5. It has some radius cuts around it...how do you guys go about removing similar bezels from the main bezel? I would like to remove them, when possible, without marring the finish, so I figured I'd ask for some methods you all may have used.

Any suggestions?

Thank you CPF
 

DUQ

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You can try heating it up with either a hot air gun or hair dryer. Then grab it while wearing sticky rubber gloves such as dish washing gloves and give it a twist. It will most likely take a lot of effort and can be very frustrating.
 

rayman

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For those small stainless steel rings like you have with the Nitecore EX10 or Thrunite Archer A1 for example, those are usually just screwed on but you normally can't get a grip on the small ring to screw it off. One good methode is to press the ring against a rubbery surface and twist with the other side of the head. This way you get enough grip on the ring and you can screw it off. Same way with screwing it back on, you can get it really tight this way.

rayman
 

jcalvert

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DISCLAIMER: The deliberate alteration or attempt to modify a flashlight that is still under warranty, will definitely VOID said warranty! The descriptions herein provided are solely for the educational purposes of those members interested in modifying a product that has a lapsed warranty, or for those persons who fully understand and accept sole and full responsibility for any irreparable damage caused to any product still under warranty that you attempt to modify. Please make prudent choices!

In addition to the variety of heating and freezing methods to help loosen the bond of a threadlock-type of adhesive where it's known or thought to be present, I've had great success with using a heavy-duty, double-sided tape such as 3M™ VHB™ (Very High Bond) tape found at most hardware, office supply, or general stores.

In a recent example, I used the 3M™ VHB™ in two different ways on the same light to perform an otherwise nearly impossible emitter swap of an Olight S15. In this example, I first applied a 1" long piece from a 1" wide roll of the double-sided, foam tape onto the side of a mid-size tape measure. (I used this tool specifically because I found its size fit the palm of my hand just right to provide greater torque. Additionally, the t.m. case's exterior is slightly convex which I found adhered to more surface area of the very small and thin bezel ring of the Olight S15). Whereas the rubber gloves and silicone pad methods previously mentioned didn't budge the ring in my prior attempts, this newer method worked immediately. Although I may have first loosened the ring a tad bit with the other methods, when I used the 3M™ VHB™/ tape measure method in my first attempt to loosen a second Olight S15's bezel ring, I had it off in seconds.

NOTE: the bezel rings on the small S-series Olights were not glued, they were simply threaded onto the bezel very tightly.

The second way in which I used the same 3M™ VHB foam tape was to remove the reflector which is also threaded into the bezel. However, since this thread is about bezel ring removal, I won't describe the reflector removal details here.

If you would like to learn more about the Olight S15 reflector removal method I used with the 3M™ VHB™ tape, or have any questions about removing the bezel ring, please feel free to PM me. Please understand that Sunday is family day in our household, therefore I will not be able to reply to any questions until this evening at the earliest, with tomorrow being more likely.

I hope the bezel ring removal method described above helps you as it helped me!

Wishing you all the best,
John Calvert
 

HotWire

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I've used strap wrenches, old tennis shoes, rubber gloves, and old pieces of discarded wood. If you heat the threaded area with a hot air soldering station any glue will melt and release. Problem solved. Heat + force! I have a small collection of tools made for the purpose that I've picked up here/there, and of course they work the best....
au.gif
 

jimmyhoffa

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Mar 12, 2011
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If you're talking about the small steel rings that hold the circuit/pill and reflector in place, they usually have two small indents. You can buy a tool designed to thread them out, cycle shops normally stock them. The easiest method is to get a pair of needle nose pliers and slot the nose of each plier bit into each indent and twist. If it's a smooth ring with no indents you can either carefully drill an indent or try use a rubber or plastic sleeve to apply pressure and twist it loose. Thin rubber hose works well enough.
 

TEEJ

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If you're talking about the small steel rings that hold the circuit/pill and reflector in place, they usually have two small indents. You can buy a tool designed to thread them out, cycle shops normally stock them. The easiest method is to get a pair of needle nose pliers and slot the nose of each plier bit into each indent and twist. If it's a smooth ring with no indents you can either carefully drill an indent or try use a rubber or plastic sleeve to apply pressure and twist it loose. Thin rubber hose works well enough.

He said the bezel though.

:D
 

Fireclaw18

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Get one of the rubber pads from the grocery store that are used to open stuck jars. Hold the light in one hand and the pad in the other. Press the bezel firmly into the pad and turn ... just like you're opening a stuck jar. Works great.

Sometimes, instead of using one of those pads I'll substitute a piece of indoor rubber stairway grip tape. Stick it on the bezel, then press the palm of my other hand into the tape and turn. Same principle and works just as well.
 

Richwouldnt

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Reno, NV
If the bezel is crenelated then press it against a piece of rug or carpet and rotate the light head while pressing down hard.
 

Nighted

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Use the bottom of your mouse pad. Just push the bezel down and be sure to twist it the right way. ;)
 

Str8stroke

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Use the bottom of your mouse pad. Just push the bezel down and be sure to twist it the right way. ;)

Good call from a Green Horn! :poke:
About exactly what I do. But, I use the rubber bottom out of a Micro Pelican case. It grabs awesome. Reminds me of that rubbery thing my mom used to open cans. It gripped the tops. Usually I can twist by hand, if not, heat it up with microwave (kidding), hair dryer then twist away.
 

more_vampires

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Canned fod jar technique? Let's see: heat, vibration, partial chilling of the device to provide a heat differential, high friction high torque device (rubber pad,) solvent soak to defeat bonding of parts, heat de-lamination of a multi-component conversion compound, hmmmmm!

HMM! Who can add? This sounds like a seriously cool thread! :)'

Talking about busting into lights for modding. Sounds great! :)
 

bykfixer

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Aug 9, 2015
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John 3:16
If none of that works dynamite has been known to be a pretty good part seperator.

Now seriously...
A couple pairs of pliers each clamped over bicycle inner tube wrapped around parts wanting to come apart.
Twist said pliers in opposite directions.

Just did that method to remove the mega-tight bezel from an Alpha light yesterday.
Narry a nick showed.
 
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