Need new Hunting light

warren5421

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My old SureFire hunting light gave up lighting my play time. I do a lot of night hunting using red, green, or white light. The white/yellow SureFire needed a battery change before going out Saturday night for coyotes, threds galled making the battery change imposable. I have not followed the crop of turbo output lights. I want recommendations on a good 100 yard very strong small hand held EDC type white/yellow flash light. Many many years ago I used a 6 D-cell MagLight but is way to big for my likes now. I don't want to put gloves on every time I turn it on.
I have no idea what to look for, my old SureFire isn't even listed anymore, it must be 25-30 years old.
 

chillinn

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My old SureFire hunting light gave up lighting my play time.
Did you notify Surefire?

Surefire said:
SureFire warrants that if you—our customer—purchase one of our products, and we determine that it is defective in material and/or workmanship during your lifetime, we will repair or replace it—no hassle!

If coyotes are a nuisance, killing them is ineffective and causes them to breed more. They will just return in greater numbers, where "undisturbed coyote populations have fewer and smaller litters, resulting in reduced motivations to feed pups, and translate into reduced depredations on livestock." Since 1850 when mass killings of coyotes began, their range has tripled and expanded into 49 states. Over 500K coyotes are killed every year in the US, and ironically this is the primary reason their population has exploded and is still increasing every year. Coyote hunters, it seems, exacerbate the problem, and killing coyotes is not the solution. Hazing is recommended and effective. One might consider the variety and joy of video games for many more times the endorphin release and skill sharpening and none of the cruelty, suffering, waste and grave risk of involuntary manslaughter.
 
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warren5421

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I have the barrel /body and on/off switch but the head came apart. It is a E2D LED DEFENDER bought by my son while in high school for me. He is 41 now. The coyotes are after my chickens, lost 19 so far.
 

chillinn

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Sent you a PM with Surefire's number. They may repair, but possibly will offer you something newer to replace it, and they'll keep doing that so long as you live. You already paid for this service, so you might as well take advantage of it.

And welcome to CPF, warren5421!
 

KITROBASKIN

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Our dog yard encircles the chicken house (now holding rabbits) plus we have bird netting to thwart the owls.

Sounds like you need to harden your perimeter as well as put the fear of humans into those superbly adapted canines.
 

DRW

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3 responses and not one recommendation as requested. I'll give it a go.

I use a Fenix HT30R for coyote hunting. It's just white. It surpasses the 100 yard mark by a factor of ten. I've never used a green light hunting. I do use red light for climbing into treestands and other activities where I'm trying to by stealthy or protect my night vision. For red I use a Fenix HM61R. If red could be swapped for green in your use case, it will handle the 100 yard white illumination as well. If you take it off the headband it's a very useful EDC light with a right angle head.

Good luck and I hope you whack and stack 'em.
 
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DRW

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If coyotes are a nuisance, killing them is ineffective and causes them to breed more. They will just return in greater numbers, where "undisturbed coyote populations have fewer and smaller litters, resulting in reduced motivations to feed pups, and translate into reduced depredations on livestock." Since 1850 when mass killings of coyotes began, their range has tripled and expanded into 49 states. Over 500K coyotes are killed every year in the US, and ironically this is the primary reason their population has exploded and is still increasing every year. Coyote hunters, it seems, exacerbate the problem, and killing coyotes is not the solution. Hazing is recommended and effective. One might consider the variety and joy of video games for many more times the endorphin release and skill sharpening and none of the cruelty, suffering, waste and grave risk of involuntary manslaughter.
No matter what study the study says. If you kill the coyote in the hen house. It's guaranteed that the dead coyote will not kill another chicken.

Hunting is a sport and requires skill, fitness, and cunning. The suggestion that video games is the solution is laughable.
 

KITROBASKIN

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My son plays Call of the Wild on X-Box. We talk weapons, caliber, penetration, placement, eye-hand coordination, timing, wind, range, behavior and ethics. Everything else is laughably not how hunting is, at all.

I'm not the only one here standing with the coyotes until the domestic feathered food sources are secure. They do not belong there otherwise. We are living in the coyotes' home. Kill 'em all and let God sort 'em out, yeah right.

Utility panel, hardware cloth (raccoons can grab through chicken wire and snag the curious or dim-witted)

I'd rather read about you all and your flashlights than be sitting out in the cold waiting for a superior being on the edge of starvation trying to survive.

But I do believe in making wild predators scared of us. I would stick with white light. I have shined coyotes and never saw them run off right away. EagTac has some throwers (M30 variants) but illuminationgear does not have as many emitter choices right now. Their kits come with color filters.

We believe a mountain lion may have gone after this fox that showed up (next to the dog yard), but not sure. Found him expired days later, chewed on.
 

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chillinn

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3 responses and not one recommendation as requested.
Perhaps you missed that I recommend the light he has, as he already paid for a lifetime warranty, he may as well use it if he likes the light. What's the Fenix warranty like?
No matter what study the study says. If you kill the coyote in the hen house. It's guaranteed that the dead coyote will not kill another chicken.
Nature is a funny thing, but with coyotes, the more you kill, the more pressure it puts on the population to have larger litters. The sole reason there are so many coyotes and the population has exploded and tripled its range is because so many are killed annually. If the goal is to protect livestock, and not just blood sport, then hazing is far more effective. You haze a female coyote, its whelps won't predate your livestock. But if you kill her and as many coyotes as you can, the litter sizes increase, and that increases the local population, and you will run out of ammo and livestock long before you run out of coyotes. But some just don't trust science, and they will never learn, unlike a coyote.
 
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DRW

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@chillinn The study you base your argument on is signed by about 70 people. It's flawed because it doesn't address the decline of coyote predators. It doesn't address wildlife as a whole, focus on one species can't be the answer.

I prefer to leave wildlife management decisions to the 1000s of people who work the job every day of the year. Hunting is an accepted management tool, and it is far more humane than allowing wildlife to starve to death. Litter size is based on what the land can support. Abundant food, good weather and there will be X number in a litter. Less food, colder than normal winters, litter size will be Y.
 

DRW

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We believe a mountain lion may have gone after this fox that showed up (next to the dog yard), but not sure. Found him expired days later, chewed on.
Nature has a way of cleaning up. It only takes a few days around here for all traces of a deer gut pile to disappear. Fox, possum, racoon, crow, turkey vultures, and coyote are our primary garbage collectors.

Michigan doesn't have many mountain lions, even though they are captured on trail cams occasionally. MI DNR says we don't have mountain lions.
 

chillinn

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I prefer to leave wildlife management decisions to the 1000s of people who work the job every day of the year.
Then you prefer to believe in fallacy, as in unsound and invalid reasoning.


and it is far more humane than allowing wildlife to starve to death.
It's a good thing the hunter is around to prevent wildlife from exhausting resources and entire populations of poor suffering creatures from starving to death. Can you just imagine what it must have been like for hundreds of millions of years when starving was all there was? Thanks to hunters, nature is even better. We owe the modern hunter quite a lot of gratitude. Where would we be without hunters? That is, other than still having Dodo, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet, Muskox, Great Auk, Tasmanian Tiger, Quagga, Falkland Islands Wolf, Zanzibar Leopard, Caribbean Monk Seal, Atlas Bear, Toolache Wallaby, Sea Mink, Bubal Hartebeest, Steller's Sea Cow, and a myriad of other species hunted to extinction. But for their own good! So they wouldn't starve.
 
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DRW

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It's a good thing the hunter is around to prevent wildlife from exhausting resources and entire populations of poor suffering creatures from starving to death. Can you just imagine what it must have been like for hundreds of millions of years when starving was all there was? Thanks to hunters, nature is even better.
Sarcasm as an argument.
 

kerneldrop

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If coyotes are a nuisance, killing them is ineffective and causes them to breed more.

Sounds like that area where hunting was ineffective just needs more rednecks.

Maybe you can solve my hog problem because hunting and trapping ain't cutting it.

I chuckled when I read about video game playing. My wife caught me playing fortnite one time without my kid…she hazed me so much that I never played another video again.
 

DRW

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It's a good thing the hunter is around to prevent wildlife from exhausting resources and entire populations of poor suffering creatures from starving to death. Can you just imagine what it must have been like for hundreds of millions of years when starving was all there was? Thanks to hunters, nature is even better. We owe the modern hunter quite a lot of gratitude. Where would we be without hunters? That is, other than still having Dodo, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet, Muskox, Great Auk, Tasmanian Tiger, Quagga, Falkland Islands Wolf, Zanzibar Leopard, Caribbean Monk Seal, Atlas Bear, Toolache Wallaby, Sea Mink, Bubal Hartebeest, Steller's Sea Cow, and a myriad of other species hunted to extinction. But for their own good! So they wouldn't starve.
You edited your post to add even more sarcasm, LOL.

Hunting as a tool of modern wildlife management is very different from past practices. Many of the species you listed provided sustenance for humans, there is no shame in that.
 

chillinn

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Very Christian of you, bykfixer, but the fallacious argument already lost, so it is quite over. You see, when a debater can't speak to the argument and instead attacks the man, he instantly loses the argument, because it doesn't matter who said what or why they said it. All that matters is what is said.
 
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