Sanyo Eneloop vs GP Recyko AA/AAA Initial Results

Wurkkos

555BUK

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Having replaced all of my non-LSD batteries (apart from the excellent Duracell 2650’s) with LSD’s, I decided to record the initial results of both Sanyo Eneloop and GP Recyko AA and AAA cells. For the record I own 12x AA Eneloop, 8x AA Recyko, 12x AAA Eneloop and 12x AAA Recyko batteries.

The specifications of both brands are very similar. Sanyo quote up to 90% charge retention over 12months whilst GP say around 85% for the same period. The Eneloops are rated at 2000mAh (1900mAh min) versus the Recyko at 2100mAh (2050mAh min). On paper they are very close, but can the Recyko’s really keep up with the better known and very highly respected Eneloops?

Below are my initial findings. All batteries were tested using a Maha C9000 (0H0DA build) running identical settings. AA cells were first discharged at 1000mAh to obtain out-of-pack charge. They were left to cool and the run through the C9000’s Refresh/Analyse mode at 1000mAh charge / 1000mAh discharge to obtain 1st Cycle Charge. AAA cells observed exactly the same tests but with 500mAh for bothe charge and discharge settings.

One thing I noticed before testing is that the Recyko’s feel heavier in their packs. The Eneloops weighed in at a respectable 26.75g / 12.1g (AA/AAA) whereas the Recyko’s weighed 29.5g / 13g. Weight does not guarantee quality but it is usually a good sign.

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Results

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Early Conclusions
From my very limited testing it is clear that "out of the packet" the GP Recyko's surpass the Eneloops. Whether this remains the case after 50, 100 or 1000 charge cycles remains to be seen. What makes the Recyko a no-brainer for me is the price. I live in the UK where Eneloops cost £6.99 (9or more) for both AA and AAA cells vs £6.40 and £5.00 for teh GP's. BARGAIN!
 
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UnknownVT

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I decided to record the initial results of both Sanyo Eneloop and GP Recyko AA and AAA cells. For the record I own 12x AA Eneloop, 8x AA Recyko, 12x AAA Eneloop and 12x AAA Recyko batteries.
One thing I noticed before testing is that the Recyko’s feel heavier in their packs. The Eneloops weighed in at a respectable 26.75g / 12.1g (AA/AAA) whereas the Recyko’s weighed 29.5g / 13g. Weight does not guarantee quality but it use usually a good sign.

Thank you very much for this.

Can you please measure the diameter of the GP ReCycko and compare with the eneloop? Are the ReCykos noticably fatter? Thanks.

I was thinking/guessing that the Kodak Pre-Charged are re-badged GP ReCykos -
please see Post #12 in thread Kodak Pre-Charged NiMH

I have found that my samples of Kodak Pre-Charged do have higher capacity than eneloops.

BUT Kodak Pre-Charged may not be able to deliver all of its capacity in voltage sensitive devices -
as they do not maintain operating voltage underload as well as eneloops -
please see summary post #57 in eneloop vs. Kodak Pre-Charged Voltage Maintenance.

Thanks,
 

555BUK

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Can you please measure the diameter of the GP ReCycko and compare with the eneloop? Are the ReCykos noticably fatter? Thanks.
An image paints a thousand words. The Recyko's are very slightly fatter than Eneloops, although overall height appears the same to me (body of Recyko is longer but nipple is shorter).

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Mr Happy

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555BUK

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Unfortunately my cheap multimeter only measures resistance down to 1 ohm.

The Kodak's do indeed look like rebadged GP's. I guess "Made in China" is not all bad.
 
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Mr Happy

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Unfortunately my cheap multimeter only measures resistance down to 1 ohm.
Please don't try to measure the internal resistance of a cell using the resistance range of a multimeter! You cannot do it that way and it might damage the meter.

Take a look at this thread, and especially post #6. You can make an approximate measurement quite well with the C9000.
 

555BUK

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Please don't try to measure the internal resistance of a cell using the resistance range of a multimeter! You cannot do it that way and it might damage the meter.
Lucky I did not try then:). I'm going to the gym now (must keep the ladies happy) but will try later.


edit: Back from the gym and here are the C9000 Resistance calculations:-

4x Recyko AA's charged last week.
Unloaded voltage = 1.37/1.37/1.38/1.37
Loaded voltage = 1.27/1.27/1.27/1.27
1.3725-1.27/1 = 0.1025 ohms

4x Eneloop AA's charged yesterday
Unloaded voltage = 1.4/1.4/1.4/1.4
Loaded voltage = 1.31/1.31/1.31/1.31
1.4-1.31/1 = 0.09 ohms

The Eneloops seem a bit high, but the Recyko's perform as suggested.
 
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555BUK

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A few more close-up's to help people confirm whether Kodak Pre-Charged are actually re-branded GP Recyko's.

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Saying that, it would be a surprise ifKodak (the world's most consistent bad battery seller) actually sold a decent battery.
 
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Niconical

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I recently replaced all of my eneloops with GP Recyko. I've only had the eneloops a few months, and they weren't used that much, just cycled (Maha C9000) then a few charges. The problem I had was that the eneloops don't look very rechargeable. Just in those few months I have lost 6 of them to family members who seemed incapable of understanding the concept of "don't throw it away, I'll get it back and recharge it next time I'm here". It doesn't help that there is a cheapy store brand of alkaline here that looks similar to the eneloop, just a plain white battery.

So, I've completed cycling of the Recykos, 28 AA and 12 AAA and although I didn't do any testing or make notes, one thing I did notice was how remarkably similar they all were. Very close available capacity out of the pack, then also very close capacity after each cycle.

They are all finished and in service now, and I'm definately happy with them. I can't imagine any battery taking the LSD crown from the eneloop, but if for whatever reason you can't get eneloops, the GP Recykos certainly seem a good equivalent.

Finally, thanks to 555BUK for the facts and figures, that sort of info is always very helpful :)
 

555BUK

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I just tried an interesting test with my Canon 430EX flashgun.

Test #1
Using full charged Eneloop and Recyko cells I took 10 successive full power flash shots and recorded the total time.
Eneloop - 8.7 seconds
Recyko - 8.8 seconds

Test #2
I fully discharged two sets, and then applied a 200mAh charge for 30mins on each. At the end of the charge I measured idle voltages and then proceeded to fire 10 flashes each.
Eneloop - (1.11v) - 28 seconds
Recyko - (1.09v) - 26 seconds

I noticed that the Eneloops fired the first 5 or 6 flashes significantly quicker than the Recyko's but then got really bogged down on the last few. The Recycle had slower initial burst speed but maintained a much more consistent shot rate, only slowing slightly at the end.

I continued to shoot until both sets of batteries refused to charge the flash in less than 30 seconds. The Recyko's gave 32 flashes and the Eneloops 29.

Both sets of batteries are actually very well matched and I doubt anyone would really notice a real-world difference in most applications. I think the Eneloops may provide "Full power" for longer but fall off dramatically at the end. The Recyko's seem to have more stamina, but perhaps not the raw grunt of the Eneloops. I guess Eneloops would show a full-power battery indicator in most devices right up until they are close to death. On the other hand, Recyko's may drop from full-power sooner, but will hang on longer with the half/low-power indicators showing. MAYBE!
 
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UnknownVT

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Eneloop - (1.11v) - 28 seconds
Recyko - (1.09v) - 26 seconds
I continued to shoot until both sets of batteries refused to charge the flash in less than 30 seconds. The Recyko's gave 32 flashes and the Eneloops 29.
I think the Eneloops may provide "Full power" for longer but fall off dramatically at the end. The Recyko's seem to have more stamina, but perhaps not the raw grunt of the Eneloops. I guess Eneloops would show a full-power battery indicator in most devices right up until they are close to death. On the other hand, Recyko's may drop from full-power sooner, but will hang on longer with the half/low-power indicators showing. MAYBE!

First (on my part) a BIG assumption that Kodak Pre-Charged are re-badged GP ReCykos....

This is what I found in this very long thread eneloop vs. Kodak Pre-Charged Voltage Maintenance (summary post #57).

I think the cause for the faster initial recycling of your flashgun is because of the higher operating "potential" ie: voltage under-load of the eneloops (there is also the tested lower internal resistance).

As for lasting longer - the GP ReCyko (in my case the Kodak Pre-Charged) bascially have higher capacity - therefore will last longer -

However in voltage sensitive/threshold devices the GP ReCyko or Kodak Pre-Charged may not be able to deliver all their capacity because their operating voltage under-load has dropped below the threshold cutoff of the device -

My Pentax K100D dSLR is a very good example - eneloops can deliver about 600-1,000 shots - so can the Kodak Pre-Charged when recently charged - but kept for over 3 months the eneloops still deliver 600-1,000 shots, but the Kodak Pre-Charged delivered a sad 350 shots and would not consistently power up the Pentax K100D - but they still had plenty of remaining capacity to light up a Fenix L1D on high for almost an hour (see post #61 ).....

So this shows eneloops have higher operating voltage maintanence under-load - but it is only significant in voltage sensitive devices (for which Pentax dSLRs using AA batteries are notorious).
 
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Perfectionist

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I live in the UK where Eneloops cost £6.99 (9or more) for both AA and AAA cells vs £6.40 and £5.00 for teh GP's. BARGAIN!
Great post Dude !! :thumbsup:

Where can you buy the GP's from at that price ?! :confused:

Also, what do you think about Hybrio's ?? :thinking:
 

555BUK

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As for lasting longer - the GP ReCyko (in my case the Kodak Pre-Charged) bascially have higher capacity - therefore will last longer -
For my tests both sets of batteries were completely drained and then charged to 100mAh capacity. Both Eneloop and Recyko had exactly the same capacity for the test. Eneloop started faster and then slowed down really quickly. Recyko was slower but kept up the flash speed for longer.
Where can you buy the GP's from at that price ?! :confused:

Also, what do you think about Hybrio's ?? :thinking:
I got my AA's here and AAA's here. Both were delivered within a few days. Never tried the Hybrio's but they are highly rated (and some are rebadged Eneloops).
 
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UnknownVT

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For my tests both sets of batteries were completely drained and then charged to 100mAh capacity. Both Eneloop and Hybrio had exactly the same capacity for the test. Eneloop started faster and then slowed down really quickly. Recyko was slower but kept up the flash speed for longer.

I saw that...
let me re-think this one.

If the batteries had exactly the same power capacity (watts) - then their behavior in terms of number of flashes "should" have been the same, that is if the flash drew the same amount of power (watts).

However if the flash drew the same current and was not dependent on the slight difference in voltage levels - then the eneloops would be depleted earlier and the GP ReCykos would last longer....

why? since the eneloops have higher operating voltage - then at the same current eneloops would be discharging more power (watts - which would explain the stronger performance earlier) and the GP ReCyko with lower operating voltage - less.......

Please correct me if I am wrong.

However I cannot figure out why the eneloop would last any less than the ReCyko - if the current capacities were the same - as eneloops with higher operating voltage should have higher overall power capacity (watt-hr).

So is the measurement of 100mAh on the Maha C9000 a true current capacity or a "representation" of power capacity?
 

555BUK

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I guess the Maha works within certain tolerances and the point at which individual sets of batteries stop charging and discharging may vary. I did not completely drain the batteries with the flash. I simply counted flashes until each set took longer than 30 seconds to reach ready state (my gf was actually holding the stopwatch and she was not too excited about it all:)). Another possibility/speculation is that the GP cells accept a charge more efficiently than Sanyo (100mAh in = efficiency% held).

I really do not have a scientific answer but can only post my observations. If I have time at the weekend I will test again. Ultimately I think different appliances may prefer different batteries. Perhaps GP's like my flashgun, or perhaps it was a fluke.

I have no bias towards either battery and my results are all accurate as tested.
 
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Perfectionist

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I got my AA's here and AAA's here. Both were delivered within a few days. Never tried the Hybrio's but they are highly rated (and some are rebadged Eneloops).
Dude !! You are SOOO da Man !! :twothumbs
I just ordered a bucket load of AA's from your Amazon link ..... 4xAA for £3.38 including postage !! Dang a ding dang doo !! :party:
All I need now is a decent (but cheap!) charger and some AAA's at that price !! :)
 

tnforever

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GP is a great brand, too bad I cant find them in the US. We stock up on a few of their Gold batteries whenever we're in Hong Kong, since they are a bit cheaper than the Duracells and Energizers available in the states.

I might have to pick some up when I go there this summer.
 

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