SATCO 30 Watt extendable LED lightbulb

Varnakov222

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I am trying to find out what indoor desk or floor lamp is compatable with this bulb shown here.

I am looking for specs and models.
 

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Dave_H

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Interesting, seems to be a proliferation of this type of LED light with the fold-out flaps. I've just picked up a 30W 3000 lumen 5000K lamp somewhat like this but only has two flaps, so better to replace a linear light such as a 4-foot tube.

Mine is Globe (Electric) model 06-3115521 if that helps. Minor problem is it did not come with a socket extender, which is required for some fixtures to allow the flaps to be bent on a sharp angle.


Dave
 
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Varnakov222

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Even though the screw in mechanism actually fits most standard desk and floor lamps, I was told because this bulb is a 30 watt LED, that it is somehow not compatable with most desk and floor lamps that use incandescent bulbs.

I was told that wattage for LED lights is not equivalent to wattage for incandescent bulbs, and that it could damage the lamp or the bulb.

I suppose this bulb was actually designed for heavier duty, outdoor use, or for a light in a car garage.
 

Dave_H

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If it's LED at 30W versus much higher power for incandescent, I don't see how damage could occur unless the light uses some sort of ballast, or transformer for low-voltage halogen (12v). Standard E26 socket should be no problem. However, this type of bulb is usually non-dimmable, so avoid dimmers.

In fact LED at lower power allows use in lights/fixtures at higher brightness than would be safe with equivalent incandescent. You could easily use 100W eq. LED (say 14W) in a lamp rated for 60W incandescent, which would run a whole lot cooler.

Dave
 

idleprocess

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These are usually marketed as garage lights due to many a new build garage lacking fixtures beyond a ceiling-mounted duplex outlet (for a garage door opener) and perhaps an Edison socket. The 'deformable' feature allows for crude distribution control from the latter as well as some potential to fit the former.
 

Dave_H

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These are usually marketed as garage lights due to many a new build garage lacking fixtures beyond a ceiling-mounted duplex outlet (for a garage door opener) and perhaps an Edison socket. The 'deformable' feature allows for crude distribution control from the latter as well as some potential to fit the former.
Trend seems to have started with these Bell+Howell "Triburst" things with three flaps, 4000 lumens. They're up to four and five flaps, have seen one at 8000 lumens...a bit crazy.

Light should work for garages as you say, large basements etc. otherwise seems like way too much light for common indoor use. Ones I have seen are non-dimmable, no easy way to reduce the output.

A reservation of mine is the non-replaceable LEDs. Who knows how long it will hold up despite claims of run life. When it fails it likely goes out in the garbage (or e-waste). You can likely get something suitable and lower powers, with individual bulbs with appropriate socketing e.g. Y adapter.

I opened up a 3-flap 6000 lumen 60W light, found it uses a type of linear driver which switches LED substrings on/off depending on the instantaneous voltage. That is one way to manage overhead. Chip is "Bright Power" BP5336H (3 per flap) driving 33 LEDs. The OP's light has only 15 LEDs, may or may not use similar scheme, or just straight linear regulator.

Dave
 
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