What watch you're wearing?

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Yes. This one is Japan View attachment 58876
Thanks for "lifting the skirt" on that one! I was just looking it up on Amazon, and it comes straight from Japan. I think it's a better looker than my Squares:
20240309_131649.jpg


The one on the right is supposedly Japanese Domestic Market, but it says Made in Thailand on back.
 
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I have an Orient Mako with deep blue face. Sadly, in the hurricane shuffle I've misplaced it. I'm sure it's around here somewhere.

I normally don't wear a watch. I set the time in my mind when I first wake up, check it again after getting ready (drift calibration), and I'm usually accurate +/- 30 seconds for the next 6-8 hours. If I can see a clock during that time period, it keeps extending. Too much time spent in broadcasting.
Orient is way too unappreciated.
 

ilikeguns40

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In case you care, I highly recommend "Jays & Kays" adapters for converting to NATO or Zulu straps. They are veteran owned and have adapters for pretty much any Casio or G-shock.
Thanks for the info. However I've tried many nato and zulu straps and honestly I can't do them haha. The rubber works best for me considering I work in dirty environments and the cleaning is fast and simple. When I wear nato or zulu straps the watch face always falls or hangs down my wrist, only way to make it stay in place is to wear it super tight and it's uncomfortable. The stock rubber strap keeps the face of the watch pretty much centered on my wrist.
 
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Thanks for the info. However I've tried many nato and zulu straps and honestly I can't do them haha. The rubber works best for me considering I work in dirty environments and the cleaning is fast and simple. When I wear nato or zulu straps the watch face always falls or hangs down my wrist, only way to make it stay in place is to wear it super tight and it's uncomfortable. The stock rubber strap keeps the face of the watch pretty much centered on my wrist.
I understand completely. There are many variables, and I have varying degrees of success (or failure) depending on the watch. You make a good point about work conditions affecting strap choice. I cannot even wear a watch at work if I'm being sensible. At one extreme, the watch will impede my ability to reach into tight areas. At the other extreme it will impede my ability to pull out of tight areas producing varying degrees of unpleasantness to my person. o_O:eek::rant:
 

ilikeguns40

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I really love the look of natos and such just can't wear them. Only watch that the nato worked for me on, which is really the one piece nylon strap made my Marathon that's on the Marathon navigator. Watch case is so light it worked very well
 

aznsx

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I understand completely. There are many variables, and I have varying degrees of success (or failure) depending on the watch. You make a good point about work conditions affecting strap choice. I cannot even wear a watch at work if I'm being sensible. At one extreme, the watch will impede my ability to reach into tight areas. At the other extreme it will impede my ability to pull out of tight areas producing varying degrees of unpleasantness to my person. o_O:eek::rant:
At my last employer, I was frowned upon by EHS if they saw mine (fortunately long sleeves were also a requirement), so I didn't flash it around. Electrical issues aside, wrist wear can also be caught by/in machinery and result in serious injury. It was instinctive for me to always remove mine before doing anything dicey, but still had to wear one to time events, etc.constantly in my work, and it's much more convenient than a 'pocket' piece. I also wore only one with a resin case and 'rubber' band, for electrical and other high stress considerations. Of course if I were working close to either live electrical or dangerous mechanical things, I would already be in trouble w/ EHS if spotted!;-)
 
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At my last employer, I was frowned upon by EHS if they saw mine (fortunately long sleeves were also a requirement), so I didn't flash it around. Electrical issues aside, wrist wear can also be caught by/in machinery and result in serious injury. It was instinctive for me to always remove mine before doing anything dicey, but still had to wear one to time events, etc.constantly in my work, and it's much more convenient than a 'pocket' piece. I also wore only one with a resin case and 'rubber' band, for electrical and other high stress considerations. Of course if I were working close to either live electrical or dangerous mechanical things, I would already be in trouble w/ EHS if spotted!;-)
Best to play it safe of course. My grandfather was a farmer, and he carried a pocket watch for the reasons you just described. He also never indicated that it was convenient, either. He did not wear his wedding ring for similar reasons. He had nearly lost his finger a day or 2 after he married my grandmother in a "perfect storm" scenario wherein the ring got caught in a perfectly shaped groove in the center of the tractor steering wheel just as the front tires hit a rock which spun the steering wheel to the point at which he had his arm twisted behind his back thanks to his ability to go with it. He was one of the tough-as-nails WWII generation, so his hands were twice the size of mine, and the ring was "soft" gold which bent and cut into his finger, but he walked away from it with no permanent harm to himself. Anyway, regarding the less convenient nature of pocket watches, it might be interesting to note that wrist watches were considered women's accessories during the First World War and were called "wristlets." It was during The War (and its crucially timed coordinated missions) that troops recognized the utility of having much quicker access to the time than that afforded by pocket watches. Soldiers began rigging pocket watches to their wrists using various means which I understand introduced us to the advent of the field watch. At least, that's what I've heard from several legitimate sources. (Thanks for listening!)
 

aznsx

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@Voider of Warranties

I still have my Grandfather's pocket watch, and it is one of my most prized possessions from my past. He was an attorney, so I'm sure nothing else would do in those days. It's one of very few things that live in the safe besides guns. I like pocket watches, and all my jeans have a watch pocket so I'm good there; however in the work enivronment I'm accustomed to, I never have a hand to facilitate the use of one there (or a second hand to operate a flashlight for that matter). EHS would probably prefer that I use one though. (Thanks for sharing that.)
 

aznsx

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One of you is bound to know this, right off.....

Speaking of the LCD finally putting the LED 'Display' button in the past, who was the first manufacturer (or couple) to do that?
I believe my first, and first several were all Seikos; but who did that first?
 

knucklegary

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ilikeguns40

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Have you tried these screen protectors, from Japan? Looks like great crystal protection when working a job,, or getting pounded into beach sand (-;

VRWOX 3-Pcs TPU Screen Protector For GW-5000U-1JF GW-5000-1JF Watch,Full Coverage TPU Screen Protector HD Clear Anti-Bubble and Anti-Scratch For (GW-5000) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FZFPPSJ?tag=cpf0b6-20
I have and at the time I cracked my last one at work so I peeled it off and went to look for more and none were available. I guess now they are, thanks for the search.
 
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One of you is bound to know this, right off.....

Speaking of the LCD finally putting the LED 'Display' button in the past, who was the first manufacturer (or couple) to do that?
I believe my first, and first several were all Seikos; but who did that first?
Copied from "Collectors Weekly."

By most accounts, the first LCD (liquid-crystal display) wristwatch was the 1972 Gruen Teletime, a four-digit, segment-display timepiece that did exactly one thing—it told the time. In 1973, Seiko released the world's first six-digit LCD quartz wristwatch (the extra two digits displayed seconds), and in 1974, Casio gave the world the Casiotron, whose digital chronometer allowed the watch to deliver calendar functions to its wearer.

LCD wristwatches delivered on the technological breakthrough promised by watches with LED, or light-emitting diode, displays, which had been introduced a few years earlier. As their name suggests, LEDs project light, and while we associate LEDs with energy efficiency today, when the Pulsar LED wristwatch was introduced by Hamilton a few years before LCD wristwatches debuted, the wearer had to press a button to see the time, otherwise the juice in the watch's battery would run out. LCDs were always on, and they were much cheaper to produce and own.
 

ilikeguns40

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If I used such a watch, would WWV jack with my time setting here in MST land where doesn't 'change' w/o GPS?
No. That MST time zone is the best area to receive signal. The towers are in Colorado so depending where you are exactly you could have a strong signal. You can manually shut off receiving mode as well
IMG_0520.png
 
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No. That MST time zone is the best area to receive signal. The towers are in Colorado so depending where you are exactly you could have a strong signal. You can manually shut off receiving mode as well View attachment 58893
I am currently exiled in the exurbs of Portland, OR, and my MultiBand G-Shocks sync up probably 95% of the time. I suspect that the 5% failure has to do with atmospheric conditions combined with the fact that I'm about 800 miles from Fort Collins. Within 500 miles is supposedly optimal and 1000 is doable per the watch instructions. Also, I had to build a shelf on a specific exterior wall facing Fort Collins with either the front or the back side of the watches aiming toward "The Fort."
Here's the idea:
20240309_220213.jpg

I designed and built that shelf when I was dying (of boredom) from Covid.
 
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