Worklights mounted in a cold garage.

PaladinNO

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Greetings!

I need some tips from the experts regarding the best solution for worklights in a cold garage. And by cold, I mean potentially -30°C during the winter.

I've just killed 4 cheapo lamps, and one expensive one (latter was supposedly -25°C rated, and it died in less than 2 weeks when winter came this year), and would like some options before I start wasting more money on the project.

I also want a motion sensor controlled lamp in the garage, but I got that handled for now.
Recently ordered a Hide-a-lite Scout G2 XS PIR, to replace a Gelia Pro (the abovementioned -25°C rated one...).

So what I am looking for are 4 fixed lamps, preferably LED, but if incandescent is the way to go for this, I'm amenable.
Don't need dimming, colour control or anything - just on or off, 1500-2000 Lumens. Been considering getting R7s halogen fixtures, and trying LED-bulbs in them, but looking for some recommendations here first. :)

Here in Norway (hence the cold...), access to different brands is severly limited, but I'll look around if anyone got any suggestions.
 

Dave_H

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Temperatures in some parts of North America can also reach as low as -30C or lower in winter. Incandescent is power-hungry and limited life, fluorescents can have difficulty at low temperatures, so LED seems logical choice. However, a lot of cheaper ones seem to be rated down to -20C but not lower, some seem to have no temperature spec. at all, you would need to check their specs.

LED "fluorescent" (replacement) shop lights could produce 2000 lumens or more, but not sure if the form factor is what you want, and price of several could add up.

I recently found, for a low price locally, a regular screw-base LED lamp with two fold-out "flaps", which is compact and can produce 3000 lumens (30W) , but is only rated down to -20C. You might find something similar with better rating. BTW what type of base is common for residential lamps in Norway?

Dave
 

jtr1962

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I did a search for "low temperature LED bulb" and "freezer LED bulb" but nothing definitive came up. I think the most problematic component at low temperatures is going to be electrolytic capacitors. Therefore, try to find a bulb which doesn't use them, or uses smaller value ones less critical to circuit operation. I'd say look at LED filament bulbs. Those often have a string of LEDs close to the mains voltage and a simple linear driver due to space constraints. The less complex the circuitry the better, which means you don't want dimmable bulbs.

I'd personally recommend the Philips ultra-efficient 60W equivalent. Unfortunately, those seem hard to get lately. Failing that, any other decent brand non-dimmable LED filament bulb is worth trying.
 

PaladinNO

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I recently found, for a low price locally, a regular screw-base LED lamp with two fold-out "flaps", which is compact and can produce 3000 lumens (30W), but is only rated down to -20C. You might find something similar with better rating. BTW what type of base is common for residential lamps in Norway?

Wow, I didn't even consider a regular outdoor lamp. Thank you, this whole thread is clearly a case of me having gone down the rabbit hole, and been unable to see other options.

We already have those around the house, with generic Philips / Osram LED bulbs, out in the weather all year round and running for half the year, and those bulbs don't fail unreasonably often.

Common indoor and outdoor residential lamps here in Norway is the E27 base. E14 for smaller, indoor lamps, and GU10 for indoor spotlights.
I have to apologize, E27 outdoor lamps / lanterns comes readily available here, in all shapes, sizes, mounts and price classes...and I didn't even once consider those, even though we already have some of them.

I upgraded some fluorescent fixtures with led tubes a few years ago and even at -50 below the lights are bright and instantaneous now.

That was my frst plan a few years back. I already have several, older 1500mm T8 fluorescent fixtures that I tried to get Osram SubstiTUBE LED tubes for...but after the third try, and all the tubes came delivered smashed (which was not surprising, given the terrible packaging every time), I gave up on that.

--------------------

Thread can be closed. I'll get some E27 outdoor lamps for this.
Thank you everyone for your replies. :)
 

jtr1962

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I upgraded some fluorescent fixtures with led tubes a few years ago and even at -50 below the lights are bright and instantaneous now.
I took an LED down to -44°C in an experiment:


LEDs love cold weather. It's mainly the driving electronics which can fail.
 

Dave_H

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I'd personally recommend the Philips ultra-efficient 60W equivalent. Unfortunately, those seem hard to get lately. Failing that, any other decent brand non-dimmable LED filament bulb is worth trying.
Interesting bulb but I do not see them at Home Depot or Home Hardware here, who carry Philips OTC. Side note, latest Ikea filament 800 lumen 60W eq. takes 5.9W (135 lumen/W); and 450 lumen 40W eq. takes 2.8W (160 lumen/W), which is getting up there.

Dave
 

Dave_H

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That was my frst plan a few years back. I already have several, older 1500mm T8 fluorescent fixtures that I tried to get Osram SubstiTUBE LED tubes for...but after the third try, and all the tubes came delivered smashed (which was not surprising, given the terrible packaging every time), I gave up on that.

--------------------

Thread can be closed. I'll get some E27 outdoor lamps for this.
Thank you everyone for your replies. :)
A few added comments:

I have experimented with 4-foot T8 LED tubes with a few fixtures, with varying results. Some just did not light up in ballasted fixtures which were supposed to work (electronic instant-start type), and neither was actually defective. Self balasted (direct-connect) in the right fixture is the best option.

Some LED tubes are glass, some have plastic cover usually with metal backing (extrusion) which is more rugged, especially in shop area. Unlike fluorescent tubes, light only emits from one side.

If E27 is best option, there are lots of choices. To get 2000 lumens you would need around 150W equivalent consuming typically 20W or so each, which can be fairly expensive. Otherwise a regular 100W eq. can give you 1500-1600 lumens.

Dave
 

kaichu dento

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Self balasted (direct-connect) in the right fixture is the best option.
Total agreement, as you get to remove the expensive weak link.
Some LED tubes are glass, some have plastic cover usually with metal backing (extrusion) which is more rugged, especially in shop area. Unlike fluorescent tubes, light only emits from one side.
The single-side emitting tubes are great in cases where you want to soften the brightness by flipping them upside down. The outbuilding we upgraded with 8 fluorescent tubes was far too bright for coming in out of the dark and I almost immediately removed half of them, and with the remaining ones, turned them over. Left us with plenty of brightness and less visual trauma!
 

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