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Thread: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

  1. #1
    Flashaholic
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    Default Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    Has anyone done a camparison test between LS w/ its own optic and the emitter putting on a reflector that can be focused (like lambda's mag mod)? Which one wins?

    AKe

  2. #2

    Default Re: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    That depends on 'what' makes it win. For larger reflectors, like a D cell MagLite, the reflector definately has the better reach, shinning out several hundred feet. However, the lens covers more area and is best in the 60ft or less distance.

    Small reflectors like in the MiniMag will focus a brighter spot, but I think the lens produces a better beam.

    Basically, I've found the lens to be best for most small flashlights, and reflectors better suited in larger flashlights like D cell lights.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic* ElektroLumens's Avatar
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    Default Re: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ake:
    Has anyone done a camparison test between LS w/ its own optic and the emitter putting on a reflector that can be focused (like lambda's mag mod)? Which one wins?

    AKe
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I did a few mods with the larger flashlights, using the reflector, and it does throw a beam much farther than the collimator. But compared to a halogen light bulb, it is still quite weak. If you want a flashlight for use in this manner, better just use an ordinary flashlight. Of course, battery life sucks, and bulbs burn out, etc.

    LED's are best suited for a short range area light. So I prefer to use the collimator lens in the modifications I do with the Luxeon Star. That's just my personal preferance. I guess it all depends on what you are going to use the flashlight for?

    Wayne www.elektrolumens.com

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    Actually I want to put an LS in a headlamp and use it for night hiking. It doesn't have to light up 300 feet away, but should give enough distance for night hiking in the woods (presumably not a paved road so I should be able to see any obstatles well in distance.)

    From what I test on LS/O, it's not so bad, but just want to see if the distance can be improved with the reflector of the headlamp better than the original Luxeon's optic or not.

    Ake

  5. #5
    Flashaholic* ElektroLumens's Avatar
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    Default Re: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ake:
    Actually I want to put an LS in a headlamp and use it for night hiking. It doesn't have to light up 300 feet away, but should give enough distance for night hiking in the woods (presumably not a paved road so I should be able to see any obstatles well in distance.)

    From what I test on LS/O, it's not so bad, but just want to see if the distance can be improved with the reflector of the headlamp better than the original Luxeon's optic or not.

    Ake
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    If you want to go for distance, use the reflector, because you still might be able to adjust the beam somewhat for area light.

    Wayne www.elektrolumens.com

    [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  6. #6

    Default Re: Whic one is better, LS w/ optic and Luxeon emitter in focussable reflector?

    Reflectors are really designed for use with spherical sources, such as incandescent and halogen bulbs.

    LED's on the other hand, are inherently directional. For example, a Luxeon Emitter casts most of its output within a 110 degree arc.

    Thus the reflector has to extend substantially forward of the LS in order to relect anything, and typical flashlight reflectors don't do this.

    A collimator, on the other hand, captures nearly 100% of the output, and, if properly designed and optically efficient, should do a much better job.

    That said, the collimator that comes with the LS/O is designed to focus the light within an fixed arc of 10 degrees. For a one-watt source, this may still be too wide for flashlight use.

    However, the new 4-watt LS/O with a 10 degree arc ought to be very impressive!

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