BYD, threat to US automakers or the new VW BUG?

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
414
Location
San Francisco
If you had a differnt EV, lived in an apartment, and found yourself frequently driving to more remote places beyond the range provided by your battery, you might find it decidedly less convenient.

I'm saying for everyone to have an EV (not just Tesla owners living houses, in California), it will take 15 or 20 years for every American road trip to be as convenient as it is for ICEV owners right now.

if you believe that intuition makes me "so spoiled" or that I "don't mind breathing poison," well, I don't know what to tell you. A bit obtuse given the things I've said in these threads.

Or perhaps you just enjoy battling anyone with even a slightly divergent opinion than your own
Even a little bit of FUD is still misleading.
 

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
414
Location
San Francisco
If you had a differnt EV, lived in an apartment, and found yourself frequently driving to more remote places beyond the range provided by your battery, you might find it decidedly less convenient.

I'm saying for everyone to have an EV (not just Tesla owners living houses, in California), it will take 15 or 20 years for every American road trip to be as convenient as it is for ICEV owners right now.

if you believe that intuition makes me "so spoiled" or that I "don't mind breathing poison," well, I don't know what to tell you. A bit obtuse given the things I've said in these threads.

Or perhaps you just enjoy battling anyone with even a slightly divergent opinion than your own.
California state law (Civil Code section 1947.6) requires landlords to approve tenant requests to install EV charging stations in their dedicated parking spaces so long as the tenant is willing to pay for the charging station and associated costs, including installation and utility costs.
 

sim1tti

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
135
California state law (Civil Code section 1947.6) requires landlords to approve tenant requests to install EV charging stations in their dedicated parking spaces so long as the tenant is willing to pay for the charging station and associated costs, including installation and utility costs.
Good policy. Relying upon tenant-financed improvements is not a perfect fix, but it will help move things forward. Requiring landlords to front the bill would be better. Or make PG&E pay for it, since they'll benefit from increased usage anyhow.

I'd bet that in 10 or 15 years, many or most CA apartments/homes with dedicated parking with have charging stations. They'll need different accommodations for the people who rely on street parking. State could have used that budget surplus a couple years back to accelerate things rather than give everyone a few hundred bucks.
 

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
414
Location
San Francisco
Good policy. Relying upon tenant-financed improvements is not a perfect fix, but it will help move things forward. Requiring landlords to front the bill would be better. Or make PG&E pay for it, since they'll benefit from increased usage anyhow.

I'd bet that in 10 or 15 years, many or most CA apartments/homes with dedicated parking with have charging stations. They'll need different accommodations for the people who rely on street parking. State could have used that budget surplus a couple years back to accelerate things rather than give everyone a few hundred bucks.
No need for charging stations. All you need is a socket. The EVSE that comes with EVs, especially the marvelous Tesla Mobile adapter ($220)which comes with standard and 14-50 plugs, is all you need. Plug and go.
 

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
414
Location
San Francisco
That is not at all what a free market means. Read some Ludwig Von Mises or something for cryin' out loud.

No one is doing anything in your face. Just people trying to live their lives without interference from those who falsely perceive themselves as victims, making vague threats about "repercussions".

The non-insane, oops (haha) I mean the healthy perspective begins with being thankful for these polluting machines over the past couple hundred years as they have raised both the standard of living, and life expectancy across the globe. This has only come about through whatever semblance, or degree of a free market that has existed thus far. If this is understood, then we might be able to have a conversation.
More like robber barons. The profit from pollution is dirty money. The toll for that position is to lose it, and usher in the new clean paradigm. VW, Mercedes, Toyota, etc... all cheated on emissions, because it's so hard to meet, EVs easily meet clean air standards. Price parody has been meet or surpassed in China. Europe and America are next.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,453
Location
Dust in the Wind
IMG_0350.jpeg

One less car.
 

letschat7

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 7, 2022
Messages
2,459
Location
West Virginia, North America
I don't understand why these or horses aren't being pushed more. In all honesty with out the slightest hint of trolling you can't really expect that manufacturing more products that are semi disposable is in anyway good for the planet.

You can have bikes from the 1940s that people are still using and a horse and buggy with animal, leather, wood, and iron can all decompose and go back into the earth when it is all used up.

I see Volvos that people brag last over a million miles. Perhaps keeping cars on the roads and limiting the use would be more beneficial.

I carpool to work in Ohio, I sometime walk or bike to work and when I'm out doing recreation I bike there. I recycle materials and even still I generate a lot of waste and buying imports from Aus, Europe, and the like uses a lot of energy to get here.

I also use a lot of primary batteries but I can turn them in to be recycled. I don't think an EV really matters but if someone gave me a free one I would use it.
 

sim1tti

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
135
No need for charging stations. All you need is a socket. The EVSE that comes with EVs, especially the marvelous Tesla Mobile adapter ($220)which comes with standard and 14-50 plugs, is all you need. Plug and go.
Depends on the circumstances. I'll reluctantly give you mine.

I have a diesel, but my girlfriend has a Chevy Volt. We rent our place. A charging port install has been estimated at $3,000+ for our old home (old unit, we'd need a new dedicated circuit and the parking area is not conveniently located).

So that's not happening, though I bet the landlord would be thrilled with our investment into his investment.

We either run a 220V or a 110V extension cord to the parking spot. 35' chords, as there are no outdoor plugs and no garage. Unfortunately this also means lost efficiency. The 110V more than the 220V, because the only 220V outlet is not ideally located, requiring a window to be left open (not safe).

With the 110 V, it takes almost three days to bring her car from 25% to 90%. With the 220V, about a day. At at Level 2 station, about 6 hours. Level 3 (less available, more destructive) takes about 90 minutes.

It's always much cheaper than gas. Much, much cheaper when at home. For local driving and short trips it's more convenient than gas too.

BUT

Road trips, or even long day trips, are not at all convenient. The non-Tesla stations take longer, are few and far in between, and are often out of commission or being used.

We use my car when driving far, when not wanting to add the hassle/time of planning ahead, or if her car doesn't have enough charge.

Things are moving along, but we're not there yet. Not for everyone.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,453
Location
Dust in the Wind
It started out as a Worksman built by a Worksman employee who added a little length to the chain stays and removed a little from the downtube to place the crank shaft forward from it's original position.
The Worksman is a style of bike truck made in New York and was used since the 1930's in factories, for newspaper bikes and other pedal powered trucks could be used for. The first beach cruisers were generally bike trucks turned into surf side slow cruisers hence the term beach cruiser.

It was painted with Corvette red acrylic. A 36t 1960's Schwinn Stingray front sprocket and 19t rear sprocket on a Sturmey Archer two speed hub and nickel plated chain make it go. Steel wheels with 11g spokes came with Schwinn style brick tread tires that were replaced with all season treads.
Leather grips and seat give it a nostalic look. The 28" gull wing bars in the photo replaced the 24" it came with. I tried some 36" longhorn steer bars but went back to the gull wing bars.

It goes 0-16mph in a day or two.
 

sim1tti

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
135
I don't understand why these or horses aren't being pushed more. In all honesty with out the slightest hint of trolling you can't really expect that manufacturing more products that are semi disposable is in anyway good for the planet....

...I see Volvos that people brag last over a million miles. Perhaps keeping cars on the roads and limiting the use would be more beneficial.
Many short vehicle trips could definitely better be replaced with bicycle rides. Especially in urban areas. I think we run into the same problems of culture and infrastructure. Old age, disability, and laziness are also probably preventative, but I think the main hindrances are roads and safety––same problem really.

Bikes share the same infrastructure with all those vehicles, so much larger, going so much faster... Cycling in most US places can be downright scary. Every small accident is life and death when a car and bike are involved.

The Netherlands figured it out, but it took a deliberate and sustained national commitment.

Never lived in the country, but I often wonder about the horses in rural America.
 

sim1tti

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Messages
135
It started out as a Worksman built by a Worksman employee who added a little length to the chain stays and removed a little from the downtube to place the crank shaft forward from it's original position.
The Worksman is a style of bike truck made in New York and was used since the 1930's in factories, for newspaper bikes and other pedal powered trucks could be used for. The first beach cruisers were generally bike trucks turned into surf side slow cruisers hence the term beach cruiser.

It was painted with Corvette red acrylic. A 36t 1960's Schwinn Stingray front sprocket and 19t rear sprocket on a Sturmey Archer two speed hub and nickel plated chain make it go. Steel wheels with 11g spokes came with Schwinn style brick tread tires that were replaced with all season treads.
Leather grips and seat give it a nostalic look. The 28" gull wing bars in the photo replaced the 24" it came with. I tried some 36" longhorn steer bars but went back to the gull wing bars.

It goes 0-16mph in a day or two.
No hills, no problem! Though I bet the two speed hub gets you over some grades. My Schwinn cruiser was useless for all but the flattest roads.

I didn't know any of that about the beach cruiser history. Makes perfect sense. The bottom bracket +forward is subtle, but does make it look a bit more laid back without being austentacious. I looked up the Worksman bikes...though the fork is surely stock I find myself thinking it should be lugged steel.
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,337
Yea pretty much, you ride on roads in modern us cities, you get hit mowed down by cars, happens everyday, you ride on sidewalk you get a ticket and your bike impounded, bike lanes are blocked by double parked cars most of the time. plenty of cars with fake/temp paper lic. plates that do not care if they run you over, you can't find them after. You got to be suicidal to commute on a bike in today's cities. I wont even drive a sedan anymore, nothing smaller than a mid size suv
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,453
Location
Dust in the Wind
No hills, no problem! Though I bet the two speed hub gets you over some grades. My Schwinn cruiser was useless for all but the flattest roads.

I didn't know any of that about the beach cruiser history. Makes perfect sense. The bottom bracket +forward is subtle, but does make it look a bit more laid back without being austentacious. I looked up the Worksman bikes...though the fork is surely stock I find myself thinking it should be lugged steel.
_storage_emulated_0_PhotoEditor_IMG_20171226_092836.jpeg

My grade buster bike.
A 21 speed Giant Suede from 2009.

The 2 speed hub on the red bike is for starting out on low and popping into high for momentum. Bendix made them for Schwinn long ago but stopped in the late 60's.

At some point Sturmey Archer reintroduced their version, which is still being made.
 
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alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,337
Sram used to make 2 speed autos, my buddy had one with a coaster brake, I loved that bike. no cables of any sort, yet it had no issues going uphill, and keep going fast on flats. unfortunately the hub broke, and is no longer made, and we could not find one with a coaster brake.
Back in a days I was looking to build a retro direct bike, then i got into MTBs and abandoned the idea
 
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