"Ghost Gunner" desktop CNC

idleprocess

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I know next to nothing about metal working and have always been interested in it, but have always been put off by my perceived inaccessibility of it from a greenhorn/hobbyist perspective.

Today I read about the Ghost Gunner project, which aside from its intent to allow people to finish 80% lowers and skirt firearms registration requirements seems like it might have some potential as a small automated 3-axis aluminum mill (or perhaps more - one need to work in 2 planes ). It certainly promises some interesting capabilities within its limited envelope.

But perhaps I would be better off with a harbor freight (or micro mark) mini-mill if I want to work with aluminum? For the $1500 estimated retail of the previously-mentioned CNC mill I could probably get a nice head start on a more versatile platform.
 

gadget_lover

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That is an interesting project. As a single purpose tool to manufacture guns, it has limited use, but I can see it becoming popular with certain circles.

It is my understanding that you are in violation if you use an 80% lower AND someone else's CNC code. This prohibition is to keep people from buying an 80% lower from the local dealer and then renting an hour of CNC time from the dealer to end up with the finished product.

The phrase "As shipped, Ghost Gunner can manufacture any mil-spec 80% AR-15 lower receiver that already has the rear take down well milled out." indicates that it may be quite limited in it's work envelope. The 7x3x2 means that it can only mill very shallow features, and only from above. My guess is that it's maximum tool length will be only a touch over 1 inch. That's OK for drilling in thin sidewalls or milling shallow pockets. It's nice that they are using 304 stainless, but it would be really nice if they said how thick the plates were. 1/8 inch plate will bend a LOT more than a 1/2 inch thick plate.

Ok.. It looks like I'm being negative. Sorry.

Starting with an 80% lower that has the "well" milled means that most of what you are milling are holes and slots. That should be easy to do on a HF minimill or even a micro-mill.


Daniel
 

idleprocess

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That is an interesting project. As a single purpose tool to manufacture guns, it has limited use, but I can see it becoming popular with certain circles.

It is my understanding that you are in violation if you use an 80% lower AND someone else's CNC code. This prohibition is to keep people from buying an 80% lower from the local dealer and then renting an hour of CNC time from the dealer to end up with the finished product.
I have little interest in milling my own AR-15 lowers from "80%" parts - finished receivers are cheap (as low as $40), readily available in my state, and I feel no great need to possess one "off record". The politics and legality of such an endeavor are really out of scope of this forum and would be best discussed elsewhere - such as the underground.

The phrase "As shipped, Ghost Gunner can manufacture any mil-spec 80% AR-15 lower receiver that already has the rear take down well milled out." indicates that it may be quite limited in it's work envelope. The 7x3x2 means that it can only mill very shallow features, and only from above. My guess is that it's maximum tool length will be only a touch over 1 inch. That's OK for drilling in thin sidewalls or milling shallow pockets. It's nice that they are using 304 stainless, but it would be really nice if they said how thick the plates were. 1/8 inch plate will bend a LOT more than a 1/2 inch thick plate.
Looking at the "80%" receiver they recommend, it appears that one will need to work in two planes - mill out the fire control group pocket (vertical) as well as trigger/hammer/safety holes (through the "flat" of the receiver). Their description suggests that this is a one-step process although perhaps they're being sly and you'll need a drill press to do this (thus their mention of "3D printable jigs"), or you have to re-orient the part at some point in the process.

Perhaps I should wait until more details are made available before further analyzing it.
 
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