Is D-9 tool steel magnetic?

gurdygurds

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 7, 2014
Messages
1,994
Just got a Pico Widgy bar off of EBay. Feels extremely light and looks like titanium to me but is supposed to be D-9 tool steel. Anyone know if D-9 is magnetic?
 

thermal guy

Flashaholic
Joined
Jan 28, 2007
Messages
10,038
Location
ny
Cr:13.5-14.5%, Ni:14.5-15.5%, Mo:2%, Mn:1.65-2.35%, Si:0.5-0.75%, C:0.035-0.05% and Ti:4-6C.
I don't see anything in there that's magnetic
 

LEDphile

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 8, 2021
Messages
321
Cr:13.5-14.5%, Ni:14.5-15.5%, Mo:2%, Mn:1.65-2.35%, Si:0.5-0.75%, C:0.035-0.05% and Ti:4-6C.
I don't see anything in there that's magnetic
Other than the balance (~60%) that's iron?

That said, the alloying elements often modify how magnetic the material is, so hard to say if D-9 is still magnetic after alloying
 

Stress_Test

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
1,334
I checked Matweb and McMaster sites and didn't find anything for D9 tool steel. Anyway, some types of stainless will be non-magnetic, others slightly magnetic.

A brief look at Google showed this as one of the quick answers:

"What is D 9 steel? The D9 alloy is a titanium-modified, 316 stainless steel which has provided improved resistance to neutron irradiation induced void swelling as compared with the unmodified 316 stainless steel."

So, 316 stainless should be non-magnetic.

This sounds like something that would be used in nuclear reactors or other nuclear type application.

Incidentally I don't think I would trust any of the technical information found on an Ebay page!
 

gurdygurds

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 7, 2014
Messages
1,994
I was thinking I got sent the wrong pry bar, (Maratac makes titanium ones as well) but maybe this is the steel version. Just super light and non magnetic so I was a tad confused. Let's see if it takes a patina 🤔. Thanks for the input kind sirs.

Edit: zero patina. Pretty sure this thing is titanium.
 
Last edited:

LEDphile

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 8, 2021
Messages
321
60% iron? Where do you see that?
Stainless steels generally are specified by the alloying elements, with the balance (typically implied) being iron. So since the listed alloying elements add up to ~40%, the remaining ~60% is iron.
 

Latest posts

Top