Light bulb stuck in yard light fixture.

IMA SOL MAN

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I have a yard light that the light bulb base and the fixture have corroded together (bulb is base down). Both are aluminum I believe. Is there something that I can put on it to loosen it up, or will I have to replace the ceramic socket?
 

PhotonWrangler

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I have a yard light that the light bulb base and the fixture have corroded together (bulb is base down). Both are aluminum I believe. Is there something that I can put on it to loosen it up, or will I have to replace the ceramic socket?
You could try some penetrating oil or LPS in there, but I'd be reluctant to trust that socket if it's that far gone.
 

knucklegary

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Cork is better than russets, after good soaking with LPS penetrating spray. Let it soak for a half day.
Similar metals threaded tightly together tend to form a tight fusion. If you get it apart use silicone paste on threads.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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I don't have any LPS, and from looking it up it looks like it may cost more than a new ceramic socket. Think I may go the ceramic socket replacement unless there is something else I already have that will work, or a lot cheaper.
 

Got Lumens?

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Your time and money replacing an $8 socket is the way to go. Get some no-oxide paste and coat the new bulbs base to prevent it again. Guess that's a drawback of LED lighting and their 100X longer runtimes before failure occurs. A bulb that got changed every year or so, now has years of time to cold weld it self in place. Most sockets use aluminum now, but copper based ones can still be found. An A27 ceramic bulb holder means it is rated for around 60W or so old school Incandescent, or possibly more. Don't forget new wire nuts :D
 

Got Lumens?

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Yes I agree using waterproof wire nuts is a plus, or requirement depending upon the installed area and configuration. Local Electrical codes and/or ordinances may require using them. Stopping by a local electrical distributor like Grainger's, not big box HD,Lowes,etc., and inquire. All installations should meet National Electrical Code requirements at the time of installation, while others required above and beyond NEC depending upon the specific installation. There still are installations out there that did not adhere to NEC requirements at their time of install.

I would only use no-oxide pastes/oils designed for electrical applications that have UL approval. Others may have flammability concerns or may not be compatible with the homes electrical wiring and or components, Ex. like vinyl electrical tape.

I try to err on the side of caution. Electricity is our deadly friend. Some shortcuts can come back to bite You, "literally"{electrically}. If a need arises to hire a professional afterwards, they may be required to replace more than just the socket, or refuse the job.
No task or service is so urgent that You can not take the time You need to perform the job safely. Please be safe.
GL
 

IMA SOL MAN

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My method doesn't require any actual electrical work. Think about it.
Yeah, I think I will try the bulb destruction method first, socket replacement if it doesn't go well. Hope this works out as DIY, because electricians are expensive for trivial matters, but cheap insurance for critical stuff. Like with the auto mechanic, "pay me now, or pay me later, it's your choice."
 
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Yeah, I think I will try the bulb destruction method first, socket replacement if it doesn't go well. Hope this works out as DIY, because electricians are expensive for trivial matters, but cheap insurance for critical stuff. Like with the auto mechanic, "pay me now, or pay me later, it's your choice."

We bought an old estate. Did this with a bunch of outdoor fixtures that are made far better than what you'll find at your local box store.
 

Got Lumens?

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We bought an old estate. Did this with a bunch of outdoor fixtures that are made far better than what you'll find at your local box store.
Old Estate, Old wiring, Yes I agree if it can be done without damaging or opening the fixtures wiring. Older fixtures and lamp holders have a far higher quality of manufacturing, and show/exhibit far less deterization over the newer installed ones.. Older devices tend to survive far better than the newer post 80's designed/installed fixtures of the present. Less than 20 year old fixtures now employ bare minimum standards of UL acceptance, and are mostly aluminum holders. Older fixtures have either heavier gauged aluminum, Tin plated steel, or solid copper lamp threads. AKA, they were not all created equally. Aluminum on Aluminum is the worst scenario of having to fix. I'll throw in a benny, most AC LED lights now come having tin coated threads that minimize the cold welding of present days inferior designs.

Failures using a direct straight approach are mostly attributed to the inferior quality/design of, replace don't repair mentality, Let me sell You another type thinking. Every single consumer electrical repair should be approached and evaluated individually. The higher quality parts survive a stuck cold welded bulbs socket using the direct approach. Beware however applying the direct approach depends upon the quality and partly age of the fixture that's being worked on. I can only offer my advice and experiences I have accumulated and witnessed the past 30+years. I'm not a licensed electrician, but my Dad and Uncle who are both Master Electricians for 40+years can. We all need to help one another :).
 

N8N

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+1 on a light swipe of silicone grease on the bulb threads.

I do the same with any exterior automotive bulbs as well. "Sil-Glyde" is commonly available at any auto parts store and I can't tell the difference between it and the much more expensive "dielectric grease"
 

M@elstrom

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Rust penetrative oil (like RP7 or WD40) will help loosen the corrosion, make sure the breaker is off and being an older property you should also be able to pull the fuse (as an additional precaution) before getting to work.

Some older electrical fixtures are worth saving (and well made) that is your call 👍
 

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