Must I wear gloves to use this light?

HKJ

HKJ

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Even with flashlights there are things you must be careful about, but this time I believe it has gone to far:

DSC_3440.jpg


If anybody is in doubt, see #3 second part.
 
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Sgt. LED

Sgt. LED

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What? Some of them get hot enough to burn the poop out of you! Real blister potential especially in some of the incans.

Do normal people need a warning, no. Sadly there is a portion of people out there that are very "special".
 
nfetterly

nfetterly

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I like the verbage on the Pelican light package. Goes something like...

No warranty against Bear attack or children under 5.


The new 1100 lumen Moddoo Triple XP-G I have "singed" myslef if I haven't locked it out and it goes on at my side. OUCH.
 
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Chadder

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Unfortunately this is what happens in a sue happy society! Someone looking for a free ride probably filed a lawsuit against SF and this is what happens. Kinda like the warning on coffee at Md's. So Sad!!
 
AnAppleSnail

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Unfortunately this is what happens in a sue happy society! Someone looking for a free ride probably filed a lawsuit against SF and this is what happens. Kinda like the warning on coffee at Md's. So Sad!!

McDonald's made coffee hotter than normal because consultants told them hotter tasted better, without regard to safety. They served coffee at 180 degrees, which can easily cause bad liquid burns - most restaurants keep served liquids below the 140-degree mark for safety. At this temperature, third-degree burns will happen in seconds if the liquid is held against skin.

After several incidents of people being burned with no corrective action taken, an elderly lady was severely burned. With any major burn to the body, or any burn to the face, hands, or genitals, you need hospital attention. She sued for hospital bills and the jury awarded punitive damages, although this was replaced by a secret agreement. These days I think they keep their coffee at a safer temperature, so the warning is unnecessary now.

It's easy to say that "silly warnings exist for silly people," but remember that the goofballs aren't all consumers ;)
 
C

Chadder

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McDonald's made coffee hotter than normal because consultants told them hotter tasted better, without regard to safety. They served coffee at 180 degrees, which can easily cause bad liquid burns - most restaurants keep served liquids below the 140-degree mark for safety. At this temperature, third-degree burns will happen in seconds if the liquid is held against skin.

After several incidents of people being burned with no corrective action taken, an elderly lady was severely burned. With any major burn to the body, or any burn to the face, hands, or genitals, you need hospital attention. She sued for hospital bills and the jury awarded punitive damages, although this was replaced by a secret agreement. These days I think they keep their coffee at a safer temperature, so the warning is unnecessary now.

It's easy to say that "silly warnings exist for silly people," but remember that the goofballs aren't all consumers ;)

Agreed, but the warnings are still there in order to prevent any further action. SureFire has always identified that the lights had a hot surface but I would bet the further explanation was because of leagal action. It think its sad that a good company has to spend the cost protecting itself from these actions becasue in the long run the cost comes back to us the consumer.
 
HKJ

HKJ

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Agreed, but the warnings are still there in order to prevent any further action. SureFire has always identified that the lights had a hot surface but I would bet the further explanation was because of leagal action. It think its sad that a good company has to spend the cost protecting itself from these actions becasue in the long run the cost comes back to us the consumer.

I believe that the biggest problem with this kind of warning, it that you learn to ignore them, because they prevent normal usage of the product.
Everybody is going to place this light against the hand part of the body.:D

Note: The light has the "Caution: hot surface" warning on the head.
 
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beavo451

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I dont know about the specific wording, but Surefire has had that warning for years.
 
DimeRazorback

DimeRazorback

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I know that some of my less than 200 lumen lights get bloody hot if set down for a while...

I think it is just their lawers using the C.A.R.E principal.

(Cover *** Retain Employment)

Imagine the law suits if someone burnt themself bad enough.
 
Larbo

Larbo

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I know my L2 gets hot rather fast, I wonder just how hot it would get if was on for half an hour straight.
One of the reasons I think 123 based lights (and there are others) are not toys and should not be given to small kids.
 
J

Jasonthephoneboy

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You have to think about it from a lawyers mind. The fact that a light company uses "Heat sinks" is because the light gets "unreasonably" hot.

To those of us that aren't lawyers, heat sinks keep the LED cool for longevity.

Parametics and Emts face the same type of problem. When doing a patient assessment, one would write "WNL" which means (to all in that field) "within normal limits" (as in skin color or something). But the lawyers viewed "WNL" as "we never looked" So one could get sued for writing that. :sigh:

It is all about perspective. Then again it is all about the user. To one user 115 degrees is not as hot, as it would b to a little old lady with frail skin, or a child. Common sense and personal responsibility aren't what they use to be.

And to answer the question. Yes wear gloves for the heat.........Also wear chemical gloves, in case the battery leaks. Wear goggles, in case the battery explodes, heck wear full body armor:tinfoil: just in case the battery explodes:poof:. Wear sunglasses, in case you shine the light in your eye. Remember to pass out sunglasses and body armor:tinfoil::tinfoil: to protect those around you in case you shine the light in their eyes or it explodes in their presence:duck:... :popcorn:-(f-f-f-fire!!!) ....Oh, and my personal favorite. "Parts of this flashlight or parts used in this flashlight, may contain lead, a chemical known o the state of California (no other state has this problem)to cause cancer and birth defects" Wow that sentence explains a lot about California.:crackup:
 
Illum

Illum

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LoL
Wait, I did have an LuxV Surefire LED head that got crazy hot.

aye, LuxVs back then had it bad...EDCing them against bare skin was okay until you put some use in them, then you'd wish you bought a holster.:ohgeez:I once had a red spot near the top of my right gluteus medius from an L4 burn. I had to investigate something outdoors past midnight and without a belt thats where the L4 clips to the underwear
 
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D

defloyd77

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I like the verbage on the Pelican light package. Goes something like...

No warranty against Bear attack or children under 5.

"This guarantee does not cover shark bite, bear attack or damage caused by children under five."

Lights sent in because of pitbull bites, cougar attacks and lights attacked and bitten by 5 and a half year olds are covered.

"So little Timmy, when Pelican asks you how old you are, you're 5 and a half. No, don't chew on that Surefire, don't you read the warning labels? OH NO!!! They didn't cover not chewing on their".... KABOOM!!!! "Uh oh, we're going to need another Timmy!" Haha, sorry, anyone remember that show?
 
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Swedpat

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I understand the reaction from the original poster, and agree that if feels a bit exaggerated. Removing the word "flashlight" from the text we could think the warning is about a shootgun or similar dangerous thing.
 
OfficerCamp

OfficerCamp

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I like the warning label on my hot water heater: it has a stick figure being sprayed by the tank with it's skin melting away. Now that is an effective way to prevent improper servicing and usage. If SF labeled their lights with a picture of a 6P burning a hole through my hand and the beam searing my retina, I'd be much more careful with how I handled my lights.
 
Mike V

Mike V

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McDonald's made coffee hotter than normal because consultants told them hotter tasted better, without regard to safety. They served coffee at 180 degrees, which can easily cause bad liquid burns - most restaurants keep served liquids below the 140-degree mark for safety.

BS.

McDonalds used and still uses standard commercial coffee dripolators like millions of other businesses. No special tweaking of the temperature.
 

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