New car, need D1S and H7 bulbs.

sac02

Newly Enlightened
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
35
Hey gang, I used to geek out hard over headlamp bulbs (I actually worked for an OEM on exterior lighting), but I haven't done much of that in many years.

What the current best options for D1S low and H7 high beam bulbs?

The 65W H7 at Daniel Stern are looking attractive.

What about the HID bulbs? I'm seeing D3S bulbs recommended in a few threads, is that a legitimate substitute? (safe, glare free, etc) Strike that thought, cursory Googling shows they are significantly different voltages/ballast requirements.

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

John_Galt

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 20, 2009
Messages
1,838
Location
SW, PA
Hmmm, Virgil must be taking the holidays off. Slacking (I kid).

I'm probably pretty close to his recommendations between the Osram xenarc nightbreaker laser +200 or philips xtremevision +150.

The Vosla 65W H7/Dan Stern 65w H7 sre virgils go-to recommendations from recent H7 discussion.
 

-Virgil-

Flashaholic
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
7,802
Aw, geeze, can't I even get a catnap? LOL

Pick either of those D1S bulbs mentioned by J. Galt; the Osram or the Philips. Despite the _apparent_ difference between "+150" and "+200", these two are functionally equivalent, and both are better than a new standard D1S (and much better than a used D1S).

The 65W H7 from Stern is the way to go on H7s, and (as always) make sure your headlamps are (1) in good condition, lenswise, and (2) aimed correctly. Stern's got a comprehensive guide on that subject.
 
Last edited:

weedkill3

Newly Enlightened
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
21
I thought for HIDs, the best bulbs are DOT approved OEMs since they output the safest color temp 4000 to 4300K? How are the nighbreakers and Philips engineering to project more light exactly? What color temp are they? I understand with halogens u can improve the filament, but how can you improve an HID bulb?
 

-Virgil-

Flashaholic
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
7,802
There is no such thing as "DOT approved". The DOT marking on a regulated item of vehicle equipment indicates that the maker/importer has certified that the equipment complies with all the relevant regulations. The linked Osram and Philips upgrade HID bulbs and the OE bulbs are all equally as DOT-certified, equally as legal.

There is also no such thing, in this context, as "the safest color temp". There is no safety advantage or disadvantage in the range of CCTs we're talking about here, approx 4200K for the original bulbs versus approx 4800K for the upgrade bulbs. Really, there would be no safety-based preference for a wider range of around 3500K to 5500K; the smart pick would be the bulb with the higher output and better precision.

The techniques to make a better-performing HID bulb are comparable to those made for halogen bulbs: the electrodes are a finer gauge, which gives higher luminance at the endpoints of the arc. And they're more precisely placed/focused; any amount of increased precision in the placement of the arc improves the performance of the headlamp, just the same as with a filament. The halide composition is adjusted to maximize arc luminance and stability, further improving headlamp performance.
 

weedkill3

Newly Enlightened
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
21
oooh cool...didnt know that. for my bmw i stuck with OEM GEs..very happy with them $38 each. Very big difference. The problem with HIDs is they keep tuning on much father down the line so many people don't replace them, they don;t know what they're missing.
 

Buck91

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
1,760
Location
USA
How does the hella 70w and 100w h7 (clear not that craptastix optilux blue bulb) compare to the 65w vosla?
 

Alaric Darconville

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 2, 2001
Messages
5,377
Location
Stillwater, America
How does the hella 70w and 100w h7 (clear not that craptastix optilux blue bulb) compare to the 65w vosla?

Hella don't make their own bulbs. Ordinarily, I'd say there's "no telling what you'll come up with because they don't make their own bulbs", but there IS telling what you'll come up with: Overwattage bulbs put your wiring (or hopefully just fuses or fusible links) and lamp assemblies at risk, and their extra-large filaments mean poor focus. It gets worse with a 100W bulb.

You'll get more light, much better beam focus, higher filament luminance (more punch/greater beam distance) and not put your lamp assemblies at risk, with the 65W H7s from Daniel Stern.

If the Hella 80W or 100W bulbs were any good, Daniel Stern would sell them and we'd be recommending them. But they aren't, he doesn't, and we don't.
 

-Virgil-

Flashaholic
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
7,802
Alaric is right. The 65w H7 just completely stomps all the other higher-wattage bulbs: more light, better focus, higher luminance, longer life, and basically zero risk to the wiring or lamp components.
 

Buck91

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
1,760
Location
USA
That's interesting. Wiring isn't a concern as I'm running 12awg custom wired relays. Suppose the housings could be.
 

Alaric Darconville

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 2, 2001
Messages
5,377
Location
Stillwater, America
Wiring isn't a concern as I'm running 12awg custom wired relays. Suppose the housings could be.
Even if the wiring and lamp assemblies and sockets could stand it (and it's doubtful the lamp assemblies can stand the 100W bulbs), the concern is you're wasting 15 or 35W per bulb to get less light and poor beam focus. The concern is your lighting won't be as good with those extreme overwattage bulbs as it would be with the 65W H7.
 
Top