The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and more...

Treeguy

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Apr 16, 2013
Messages
432
Location
Quebec, Canada.
Thanks! Off to the store tomorrow to check one out.

These were the pics from the thread. Still had them in photobucket.

The knife was for size comparison, and it looks cool. :cool:

Can't remember exactly, but I think this was 20 minutes or less.

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scout24

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Dec 23, 2008
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Penn's Woods
Treeguy-Love the Stihl saws, picked up a non-folding one last time I was at my generator guy's shop. Pricey, but boy do they cut... Any opinion on the Silky line of saws, since you're in the business? Fixed handle Silky Zubat 330 is my home base saw of choice, the Stihl stays in my vehicle kit. (Slightly smaller than the Silky.)
 

Treeguy

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Apr 16, 2013
Messages
432
Location
Quebec, Canada.
Treeguy-Love the Stihl saws, picked up a non-folding one last time I was at my generator guy's shop. Pricey, but boy do they cut... Any opinion on the Silky line of saws, since you're in the business? Fixed handle Silky Zubat 330 is my home base saw of choice, the Stihl stays in my vehicle kit. (Slightly smaller than the Silky.)

The guy I work with has either a Silky or a Zubat. Actually he has two or three. For the life of me I'm not sure which company, maybe both. He has two folders and one fixed blade. He pays more for his than I do for the Stihl, that's for sure, but he uses his for pruning up in the tree and I use mine at the chipper to cut into the V of the sections of the larger branches that that would otherwise jam up. I find it faster and safer - and less annoying - than starting the saw just for one small cut. Especially if you have to do it often.

Far as I know, Silky was an excellent rep.
 

Tre_Asay

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Jun 12, 2015
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398
Location
Caldwell Idaho
Axes can split wood, saws if well maintained and properly used cut much faster and more precisely. One exemption is knocking small limbs off of trunks (axes can do it in one swing). If I could only have one woodworking tool besides a knife it would be a saw, the best would be a bow saw IMO. A good folding saw is definitely on my list.
 

Grizzman

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Jul 6, 2012
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Location
KC Metro
This is a great thread that's making nice progress.

Plastic trash bags are quite handy, and take up very little space.

While I've used Chlorine and water purification tablets, it was in addition to the purification done by my Katadyn Pocket. One or the other is okay, but both are best.

It seems the Stilh folding saw has been discontinued/replaced. I've had a Gerber folding saw for a couple decades, and it works pretty well. I'll likely get a Silky in a few weeks.

A Schrade SCAXE2 arrived today, and it seems well made (except for the sheath).
 
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Tre_Asay

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Jun 12, 2015
Messages
398
Location
Caldwell Idaho
I am sorry for being slow with updating this thread, I got a full time job and I only have access to cpf on mobile or mac with trackpad, which makes editing a pain when combined with some of the forums own quirks.

Some more Ideas:
Scissors
Glowsticks
lip balm
petrolium jelly
superglue
needle tweezers
ratcheting socket set
lighters (butane, torch, liquid fuel)
solar powered watch
hard currency
tradable metals
metalworking tools specifically files
 

Poppy

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Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,462
Location
Northern New Jersey
In my car, I keep a large plastic coffee can, with plastic bags, a roll of toilet paper, a package of baby wipes, a bottle of purel (alcohol based gel hand sanitizer), and a small 4oz bottle of porti-potty deodorant. For a while I kept stuff in a 5 gallon spackel bucket, with plastic garbage bags, and a bungie cord for a SHTF porti-john. But it took up too much room in my trunk. And while all that may seem excessive, a couple of years ago, we had a significant snow storm that left hundreds of vehicles stranded on the New York State thruway for 27 hours.

Stuck in traffic on the side of the road, male or female can throw a blanket over his/her lap, and relieve him/herself while in the car if necessary.

In the winter I keep a 26oz bag of trail mix. That's about 3500 tasty calories.
Also I add a long handled shovel.

I almost always have a couple of bottles of water, maybe more.

I always have extra fleece blankets, and a couple fleece sweat-shirt type over-shirts, and some spare pairs of socks.
I also have a 100' length of 1/2 inch nylon line, and 3 or 4 inch pully. In a get out of town scenario, I might throw in another 100' length. I'd wish treeguy was with me, because I don't have a gas powered chain saw, and I like peanut butter :)

My winter/ 3 season coats have gortex linings, and I have a pair of gortex rain pants in the trunk. I also keep multiple cheap plastic ponchos and "survival" mylar blankets in my first aid kit. Plastic bags, over socks, but inside running shoes, can help to keep feet dry... wet feet are a bummer :( .

More during the Summer than Winter, I am guilty of letting my car run down to less than a 1/4 tank before filling her up, when running around town, but I top her off if going anywhere, and especially if there is an impending storm. I also have fuel for the generator that I can use for the car in a SHTF, get out of town scenario, if I need to. BTW, a gallon of fuel may have good trade value. Back in the '70's, during a fuel shortage and some rationing, I picked up a few hitch-hikers who had a gallon of gas and a sign... "Free Gas!"

If I was to bug-out, outside of my car, I would bring a power bank, a cigar lighter to USB adapter, and a pair of alligator clipped jumper wires, and USB charger wires for both apple, and micro usb phones, etc. I am sure that there will be many abandoned vehicles clogging the highways with fully charged batteries, that are either out of gas, or stuck between other cars that are out of gas. With the proper tools, I can charge my stuff, and anyone traveling with me. Again... there may be trade value in being able to charge other people's stuff.

If I planned to bug out by car, I would bring back packs, and a bicycle or two. Stuff tied to a bicycle can be a pretty efficient way to move stuff along a road, or dirt path. Ask the viet cong how they moved artillery pieces along the ho chi min trail.

And for protection I would bring Michonne :thumbsup:
 
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braddy

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Nov 24, 2011
Messages
516
Sleeping bag.......... fleece blankets are what you put inside of the sleeping bag for extra warmth, or drape over your shoulders as you sit in the bag using your arms reading, or eating, and melting snow, or melting the water that you carry in a little 6 pack size soft sided cooler, but that froze during the week before you now need it. Freezing temps are also why in cold climates you keep the water in small portions so that you can cut the plastic bottle off and put the ice into your stainless steel cup, or pot for melting.

At some point you will have to get out of the car to see if you can dig yourself out, or to use the bathroom, or whatever, that means at least your shoes and socks and pants may be wet from snow or rain, and you don't want to destroy your bedding with wet clothes, and since the car won't start, you need to think through what you need to change into to keep your bedding dry, and yourself warm and dry.

During winter your car should be able to become a nest, but remember that you will be outside at times, in whatever conditions, and that you may be spending a lot of time outside sweating and digging in snow, or whatever, but if conditions are dire, then you need to be able to not drag that wet in with you and kill your sleeping bag.

If you can melt snow then know that food is easy, buy some dry food that you eat at home, and replace it every year, a box of instant potatoes or instant oatmeal is adequate if you live in that kind of cold, dry foods won't freeze, and almost dry foods that come in small sizes, such as protein bars, can be thawed out in your pockets and at the bottom of your sleeping bag.

Just remember the nights that you were watching TV on the couch, and a single blanket wasn't quite enough to keep you comfortable.

Sitting in a car that is 50 degrees inside or 20 degrees, or far worse, will be a nightmare, or even death with the recommended "wool blanket" that the government always describes, sleeping bags save lives. in winter, even if you don't have food and water, at least have a sleeping bag, and have a fleece blanket to go inside it.
 
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nbp

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Dec 16, 2007
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Location
Wisconsin
Great post Braddy! You touched on several things I have always struggled with in regards to my survival bag in my car. I have a bunch of useful gear in there, so I am fairly prepared. I do keep a 20F sleeping bag in the truck, that I can get inside of if I am stuck in the snow somewhere, as well as one of those heat reflective bivvy sacks that stuff into a tiny pouch if it get's really bad. Plus a number of other items. I had food in there, but I think I pulled and ate that at some point when it neared expiration and need to replace it. The main concern is water, and I have struggled with solution. We do have snow here, so there usually always is that, but clean drinking water would be nice. The problem is the bottles freeze in a couple of hours. I like the idea of a number of small bottles rather than large ones so that I can just slice them open and melt smaller chunks down for drinking. Carrying them in and out of the car every day so they stay liquid is just not a reasonable solution IMO.
 

braddy

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Nov 24, 2011
Messages
516
In your situation pocket warmers would help your water issue a lot, you will still have to melt ice and snow, at least at first, but if you put a couple of 12 hour warmers inside the small hard sided cooler holding your frozen water bottles, it will give you a hot environment that will soften or even melt the ice in the other water bottles, it will be a place to store your already melted water that would refreeze as you sit in the car, it would thaw your food, such as sardines in flat cans, or protein bars or whatever.

If one is melting snow or ice to drink, it would also be nice to have a thermos so that you only need to go through the melting process in one large batch a day, or even to keep at the ready your 2nd and 3rd cups of hot drinks as you make instant coffee, or hot chocolate, or bullion.

With the extreme cold in Wisconsin, I wouldn't bother with fighting the sub zero food storage conditions, and the fighting to not prematurely eat my tasty beef jerky, candy bars, and other tasty food treats, instead I would just keep a couple of boxes of instant potatoes for lunch and dinner, 2-12 packs of instant oatmeal for breakfast, 2-12 packs of instant hot chocolate for treats and fluids, a small jar of instant coffee, and call it a day, that would be sufficient for 2 people for a few days.

Even tea candles can heat water sufficiently to be able to reconstitute those dry foods enough to make them edible.
 
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Poppy

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Dec 20, 2012
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Location
Northern New Jersey
Five years ago, I started a thread on putting together a winter driving safety kit.

There were many good ideas submitted by myself, and others, including, cooking on the engine block/ or engine exhaust. Using carpenters snap line chalk to write in the snow to call for help, keeping a coffee can so that one can relieve himself with out having to get out of the car, using a propane torch for heat, and many other suggestions. It might be worth a read, maybe a chuckle.

In the winter, I melt frozen bottles of water by placing it on my dash and running the defrosters.
 

braddy

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Nov 24, 2011
Messages
516
When I prepare for surviving in the car, I always assume that the car won't start, so no heater, no car battery charging, no running cell phone and flashlight battery chargers out of the cigarette lighter, no making coffee with my 12v Mr.Coffee, no interior light, no running the engine to keep the block from freezing if I didn't put in enough antifreeze.

I always base my prepping for the car as it being a windless glass box with a padded seat, and interior temperatures well below zero, that I may have to work on the car for many hours, and that I may have to stay in it for a minimum of 3 days and up to 5 days at optimum comfort, with the ability to stretch things out if I feel that it could drag on longer than 5 days, and with the possibility of having to hike out, with an over night outdoor stay in those sub zero temperatures.

Of course everything is different for desert traveling in the summer.
 
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Poppy

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Dec 20, 2012
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Location
Northern New Jersey
Braddy,
I am sure that if I lived in your environment, I would take surviving in the cold more seriously than I do. Or rather, I would prepare for colder, harsher conditions. Here in NJ, we rarely see temperatures in the low teens, (even at night). Also it may be the most densely populated state in the nation. 90% of my time is spent within 20 miles from home. If my life depended on it, there are literally thousands of homes that I could break into for shelter between anywhere I am likely to be, and my house.

I am also a proponent of staying in touch with my adult children, and letting them know where I am, where I am going, and the route I am planning to take so they would know where to start looking if I suddenly go off grid.

Perhaps one of the better suggestions made by one of the posters in the thread I linked to above was to:
1. Dress/wear the clothing you would want to wear if you had to walk in that weather, and
2. then take the clothing off in the car once it warms up.

If you wear dress shoes to work, have a spare pair of water proof boots in the trunk.
While I don't have that, I do have plastic bags I can put over my socks, and spare socks, and a pair of gortex rain pants in the trunk, and as I mentioned, my coat is gortex lined, with a hood.

Multiple ponchos make for good wind blocks, as well as a tyvec jumpsuit.
Socks can be somewhat decent mittens.
 

braddy

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Nov 24, 2011
Messages
516
This was New Jersey last winter--- ""Almost 30 communities across New Jersey felt cutting conditions of temperatures below zero overnight -- one of which dropped to negative 20 degrees. ""
http://www.nj.com/weather/index.ssf/2015/02/the_25_coldest_places_recorded_in_nj_this_morning.html

I live in Southern California but I travel, and I love snow storms, blizzards, and to sleep in the car in snowy mountain passes, and I have lived in various regions of the U.S. at one time or another.

Spending a night in the car when the engine won't start and the temperature is in the teens, and the person is just sitting there in the cold with a blanket around them, will really educate someone about what they need to carry in their car, because it will be a night that they won't forget, and if they travel with a spouse, it won't go well.
I actually carry a small bottle of Grand Marnier for a companion scenario, showing a woman that she will be warm, fed, and serving her a nice drink and lighting a candle, and turning the night into a non threatening little adventure, can be a positive.

If I lived in New Jersey I would still be prepared for the cold during winter.

When I'm tired and the car breaks down at night, I want to just get in my bag stuffed with my fleece blanket, eat a snack, read a little and listen to some music, and then have a good nights sleep, and wake up warm to a breakfast and a cup of coffee, I do not want to go into a winter survival tale of walking through wet, cold, bad weather at midnight, looking for homes to break into, dealing with dogs, and hoping that the owner isn't going to shoot me.

A wonderful position to be in when the weather conditions are miserable and your car dies at night and you have to pull off the road and park, is to know that you can get cozy and just worry about it all the next morning, when the sun is up and people are awake and going to work, and you, and they are refreshed and rested. I learned as a teen how trying to solve everything late at night and into the morning, just makes everyone miserable, yourself, the friends that you call trying to drag them out of bed to rescue you, everyone, it is better to just sleep on it, and sometimes you don't have any other choice, like in freak snowstorms.
 
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Poppy

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Dec 20, 2012
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Location
Northern New Jersey
This was New Jersey last winter--- ""Almost 30 communities across New Jersey felt cutting conditions of temperatures below zero overnight -- one of which dropped to negative 20 degrees. ""
http://www.nj.com/weather/index.ssf/2015/02/the_25_coldest_places_recorded_in_nj_this_morning.html

<SNIP>.

Ahhh yes... you got me there! I was stuck in the house all last winter, and had forgotten how cold it had gotten.

Did you ever consider cutting pieces of bubble wrap, maybe the mylar reflectored type to the sizes of your windows as insulation? I am sure that a lot of the heat is lost through the glass.
 

braddy

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Joined
Nov 24, 2011
Messages
516
That is what the sleeping bag and blankets and clothing are for, a car is vastly superior to a tent, and some of us camp, or have camped in 20 and 30 below zero, you pitch your one man tent in the snow, and depend on the bedding to keep you warm, the car is already a wonderfully fantastic winter shelter.
 

reppans

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Mar 25, 2007
Messages
4,873
The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and mor...

deleted... my bad
 
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