The long list of potentially useful stuff in bug out, SHTF, car kits, and more...

Monocrom

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Okay, these are heavy. Also, not to be used except in dire emergencies.... A silcock key.

Preferably the 4-way variety since those four are the most common you'll encounter. These keys are common. Easily found in most hardware stores. Here's a vid to illustrate how to use one.

 

nbp

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Those are handy; I've got one in my truck for work. Nice to be able to turn on the water on commercial buildings!
 

Monocrom

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Happy to help, guys. I've only seen those keys mentioned by one survival expert as a useful item to include in a BOB.
 
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Monocrom

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Just noticed something. I don't think this has been mentioned yet.... A good, compact, survival manual.

You can know a lot of things, you can know how to use all the tools in your BOB or your vehicle. But a refresher helps. Plus, taking time to sit and read can help calm one down a bit in an Emergency, to prevent panic. I know we're sticking to mostly generic items. But the best one I've found is the compact version of the SAS survival manual. Plus, the pages are laminated. So, you can read in a damp environment. Just keep in mind that the pages are a bit water-resistant. Not waterproof.
 

Tre_Asay

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Just noticed something. I don't think this has been mentioned yet.... A good, compact, survival manual.

You can know a lot of things, you can know how to use all the tools in your BOB or your vehicle. But a refresher helps. Plus, taking time to sit and read can help calm one down a bit in an Emergency, to prevent panic. I know we're sticking to mostly generic items. But the best one I've found is the compact version of the SAS survival manual. Plus, the pages are laminated. So, you can read in a damp environment. Just keep in mind that the pages are a bit water-resistant. Not waterproof.
I was thinking along the lines of that as well, books for if the world collapses badly. They could be books about traditional skills like woodcraft, or books about first aid and medical treatment.
 

Tac Gunner

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This is a great thread with great suggestions. I have my edc bag set up and it fits my needs well, still working on my get home bag.

May I suggest for tools you add in:
*Vice Grips
*Small adjustable wrench
*Multi bit screwdriver
*Small Pry Bar


I got all of those at Walmart and edc them in my Maxpedition G.T.G Versipack. The black pouch is about 6x8 and really doesn't a take up much room. I carried a Multi tool for awhile but I found it always caused more problems than it solved. I have found with these tools I can usually come up with some type of temporary fix in a pinch. No vice grips aren't the best on nuts and bolts but in a pinch they take the place of a lot of sockets, wrenches, pliers, clamps, etc. With the adjustable wrench you get a little more of a precise fit. The 4 bit screwdriver (2 Philips, 2 straight blades) covers almost every screwdriver need I have come across and if he screw won't break loose you can put the adjustable wrench on the shank for more leverage. The screwdriver also has two different size nut drivers. As for the pry bar, it works great for breaking ice, scrapping, opening cans, pulling nails, improvised hammer, etc, etc. The main reason I keep it handy is if I need to break a window, open a door or window, or some other type of extraction.
 

Monocrom

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I was thinking along the lines of that as well, books for if the world collapses badly. They could be books about traditional skills like woodcraft, or books about first aid and medical treatment.


I have books about all that. :)

But weight would be an issue unless they were car-carry.
 

Monocrom

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*Small Pry Bar

I have a similar prybar I keep in my car kit. Only the shaft is longer. It's called a "Molding Claw Bar."

I know Lowe's Hardware stocks them. I've heard that Ace does too. Far more versatile than smaller EDC prybars without the weight of full-sized ones.
 

Tac Gunner

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I know the ones you are talking about. I debated between it and this one and decided on the little one for my edc bag and just carry a full size crow bar in the vehicle
 

BloodLust

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I carry my EDC in a Travelon anti-theft pistol bag.

My main EDC is a Fenix LD10 with a diffuser wand.
I like his particular light because I can choose to turn it on in either turbo or low. Good mode spacing as well. I got a diffuser tip for it when I need a lamp or area light.
Runns on AA. I have an Eneloop in it plus 1 spare battery. AA batteries are easy to acquire in an emergency.

My backup is the Jetbam/Nite-Eye Mini 1 clipped to my wallet along with a Utilikey.

I have 2 phones. Each on a different network. 1 main line and a prepaid one as backup.

Some meds and water purification tabs as well.

This can supplement my BOB which lights are streamlined to run off AAs as well.
I have both primary lithiums in there plus an extra set of Eneloops.
Goal Zero Nomad 7 solar panel, Guide 10 pluss AA/AAA battery pack/charger and an Xtar XP1 single bay charger which can charge both lithium ion and Ni-MH. Easier to charge just 1 battery if the in a hurry or the sun is weak.
 

Monocrom

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Okay, technically this isn't part of a BOB. Simply supplements it. A slightly large belt pouch or average fanny pack with the basics needed in it. Not my idea. Comes from a student of a wilderness survival expert.

Concept being that should you have to ditch your BOB for whatever reason, you still have the basics that your EDC doesn't cover. For example, a few water purification tabs, a small ferro rod and striker, a decent multi-tool with a saw feature (if you don't EDC one, or perhaps carry a tiny multi-tool as your EDC). Along those lines. Items to only be used if you get separated from your BOB. Perhaps because someone wants it and starts chasing you with ill intent. Might have to ditch it due to its weight slowing down your escape. Or perhaps you decide getting rid of it will satisfy your pursuer. You might be out matched or outgunned. At least with the belt kit that never leaves your body, you still have a few supplies to keep going.
 
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Monocrom

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Redundancy is also important, without going overboard.

I agree. I think that such a pouch or fanny pack would be the right amount of redundancy with regards to the most important items in one's BOB. Imagine being out there for two days. You're only two days away from reaching your BOL (Bug Out Location) when you encounter....

Fill in the blank. Lone desperate individual with a gun, a scared woman who begs you to take her with you so that after you fall asleep she can steal your BOB, slipping as you cross a rushing river and while you make it safely downstream your BOB that you were carrying above your head is now elsewhere, a bear pawing your BOB pack as you start to return to camp after walking away to take a leak, etc.

You made it this far. What now? Without a supplementing belt pouch or fanny pack, you'd be facing a situation very different than with one.
 

Monocrom

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Here's one type of gun made by a few different companies....

Takedown Carbines.

Often called Takedown guns or sometimes Takedown rifles. But carbine is the most accurate description. Most are .22LR in caliber. But .410 gauge and even 12 gauge shooting varieties exist. The classic AR-7 in .22LR is one good example (still made today as the Henry Survival Rifle). Unfortunately the .410 gauge Garcia Bronco all-metal shotgun that separates into two pieces and is very inexpensive, is out of production. Ruger has a Takedown variation of their 10/22 model. There's the Taylor's 1892 Alaskan model in either .357 Magnum or .44 Magnum. It's a lever-action carbine made in a modern-day materials way.

Unlike the AR-7, many modern-day Takedowns are closer in design to the unfortunately discontinued Springfield Armoury M6. Making for a very compact package. If you can find one in good shape, the M6 with it's dual barrels that fire .22LR and .410 gauge is worth considering. Though nowadays you'll likely pay a large premium for one.

Many Takedowns separate into two pieces. You simply screw the barrel assembly onto the stock. Though I don't like that arrangement. Same reason I don't like compact outdoor stoves (designed to burn wood) being made in multiple separate pieces that you have to assemble. Lose one piece, and your stove is now completely useless.

Some of you are likely saying, "There's still the matter of weight and bulk in even a large BOB."

True! Absolutely true. With some of the Takedowns, that's true. Still, they're good car-carry emergency survival and Bug-out guns. Plus, a couple can actually fit in a large BOB pack with a minimum of bulk and not too much weight. The two best ones would be the aforementioned Henry (AR-7) along with the little skeletonized Chiappa Little Badger (folding) model. You can't get more minimalist that the L.B. (though the Henry is going to be more versatile).

The L.B. is a single-shot .22LR (.22 Magnum or .17 HMR models exist too) with the ability to hold spare rounds inside its skeletonized stock. Only negative being (outside the ones of its very design) is that Chiappa is not known for outstanding quality. Better-than-decent quality to just good quality. You're not getting Ruger 10/22 quality with this little guy.

Also keep in mind that Takedown guns, while they can be pressed into service for that role, are not made for self-defense against 2 or 4-legged predators (with the 1892 Taylor's model being the big exception to that). These are outdoor survival guns made for small-game hunting. Rabbits and similar sized critters for your cooking kit that you packed in your BOB. Yes, an AR-7 is better than nothing in a self-defense encounter, (and why I think it's a better choice than the L.B. for packing in a BOB) it's still very far from ideal. Especially in a scenario where regular medical services are non-existent for now or possibly for a very long time. Keep that in mind if you have the option to flee but instead choose to stay and shoot it out with armed adversaries, instead.

A Takedown is still worth considering. Especially in a large BOB with something along the lines of the Henry or the Chiappa mentioned above. Chiappa has other Takedowns too. One is a spiritual clone of the M6.
 
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BloodLust

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I personally haven't tried one, but would a snuggie be useful kept in a car for emergencies?
snuggie-family-750x400.jpg
 

scout24

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Monocrom- I'd like to add the Marlin Papoose model 70P to your list of takedown carbines. Comes in a nice zippered case that can hold some other items, the case also has sling points for a shoulder strap.
 

Monocrom

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It's definitely a good one. Sorry I overlooked it. Slipped my mind. Sucks getting older.
 

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