Thrunite T10S (XP-G2, 1xAA, Stainless Steel) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS, VIDEO+

selfbuilt

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Warning: pic heavy, as usual. :whistle:

T10S004.jpg

T10S005.jpg

T10S015.jpg


The T10S is the new stainless steel version of the T10 from Thrunite. But it is more than just a material change – the T10S also features a reverse clicky switch, and the latest XP-G2 emitter.

Let’s see how it compares to the competition. :whistle:

Manufacturer Reported Specifications:
(note: as always, these are simply what the manufacturer provides – scroll down to see my actual testing results).

  • LED: Cree XP-G2
  • Three modes of output: Low (0.2 lumens, 147hrs), Medium (20 lumens, 39hrs), High (169 lumens, 1.5hrs)
  • Uses one 1.5V AA battery.
  • Max output: 169 lumens with XP-G2.
  • Working voltage: 0.9V-3V
  • Peak beam intensity: 1602cd
  • Peak beam distance: 80m
  • Reverse polarity protection design to protect from improper battery installation.
  • Tail-switch and twisting head design.
  • Stainless steel body.
  • Toughened ultra-clear glass lens with anti-reflective coating.
  • OP reflector gives perfect flood.
  • Removable clip.
  • Stand on tail to serve as a candle, with the wand covered on the head.
  • Impact resistance: 1.5M
  • Waterproof: IPX8 (2M)
  • Dimensions: 93.5mm (Length) x 19mm (Diameter).
  • 63.5g weight (without battery).
  • MSRP: $40
T10S001.jpg

T10S003.jpg


Packaging is stylish, with a light-weight metal case with clear display window. Inside, in packing foam is the light, diffuser wand, extra o-ring, pocket clip with screws and mini-Allen key, and manual.

T10S031.jpg

T10S033.jpg

T10S017.jpg

From left to right: Duracell NiMH AA; Thrunite T10S; T10; Zebralight SC52; Rofis ER12; Fenix E11, LD12; JetBeam E3S; L3 Illumination L10.

All dimensions directly measured, and given with no batteries installed:

Thrunite T10S: Weight: 60.9g; Length: 93.7mm, Width (bezel): 17.8mm, Width (widest): 18.7mm
L3 Illumination L10: Weight: 20.7g, Length: 79.4mm, Width (bezel): 17.1mm
ArmyTek A1 XP-G: Weight: 57.3g, Length: 96.8mm , Width (bezel): 23.1mm
Fenix LD12: Weight: 52.3g, Length: 99.9mm, Width (bezel): 21.6mm
Foursevens Mini AA: Weight: 17.6g, Length: 78.2mm, Width (bezel): 17.6mm
Olight S15 1xAA: Weight: 46.4g, Length: 87.0mm, Width (bezel): 23.1mm
Nitecore EA1: Weight: 50.6g, Length: 84.3mm, Width (bezel): 25.41mm
Nitecore MT1A: Weight: 54.6g, Length: 104.6mm, Width (bezel): 22.7mm
Nitecore SENS AA: Weight: 26.1g, Length: 82.7mm, Width (bezel): 19.8mm
Lumintop ED15: Weight: 59.7g, Length: 100.2, Width (bezel): 21.9mm
Zebralight SC52: Weight 39.5g, Length 79.0mm, Width (bezel): 22.6mm, Width (max) 25.4mm
Rofis ER12: Wright: 35.5g, Length: 96.2mm, Width (bezel): 18.6mm
Xeno E03:: Weight: 48.1g, Length 96.7mm, Width (bezel): 21.5mm

As you can see, the stainless steel construction adds a bit weight to the T10S. Overall dimensions are still quite reasonable for this class.

T10S016.jpg

T10S012.jpg

T10S011.jpg

T10S007.jpg


The T10S has a solid stainless steel construction, with a brushed finish. Labels are in black, but fairly unobtrusive. There is no knurling to speak of, but there are fluted ridges on the head. This are sufficient to allow you operate the light one-handed (i.e., you can twist the head one-handed).

I recommend you install the included pocket clip – not only does it help with grip, bit it serves as an effective anti-roll device (otherwise, there is nothing to stop rolling). The clip is not very large, and fairly lightweight, but seems to work alright as a pocket clip. It reminds me a lot of the clip that comes on the Jetbeam RRT-0 - and is similarly fastened by a pair of screws.

The light's screw threads are standard triangular cut, fairly fine (like most lights in this class). As with all small lights, you can expect some play with the threads. There is also potentially greater resistance than most aluminum lights. But I found performance to be decent for stainless steel. Interestingly, the light can still function as a twisty (i.e., contact is only made when the head is fully tight against the body). I presume the contact plate in the head is isolated from the body.

There is a physical clicky in the tail, under a stainless steel boot cover. Switch is the reverse-clicky type (i.e., press and release to turn on/off), although you can potentially change modes by a soft-press. Scroll down to the User Interface section for more info.

There are raised lanyard attachment points at the base of the tail, with cut-outs. As such, the lights can all tailstand stably. However, the actual switch is still somewhat recessed (due to the low-profile switch and boot cover).

T10S014.jpg

T10S013.jpg


Interestingly, the T10S comes with a diffuser wand attachment, which fits securely on the light.

T10S008.jpg

T10S023.jpg


Centering of the XP-G2 cool white emitter was good on my sample. As expected, the reflector is not very deep, and has an orange peel (OP) texturing to help smooth out the beam. Please see my detailed beamshots later in this review.

User Interface

The T10S has a revised interface from the earlier T10.

With the head fully tight, turn the light on or off by the tail switch. Switch is basically a reverse clicky switch, so you need to fully press and release to activate the light (i.e., click and release).

However, you are able to switch modes by either full off/on clicks of the switch, or a partial soft-press and release. Pressure required for the soft press takes a little getting used to, but does work (and is rare on a reverse clicky switch). Mode sequence is Lo > Med > Hi, in repeating sequence.

Thoughtfully, the T10S still works as a twisty-style light. With the switch clicked in the On position, you can turn the light off/on or change modes by a simple loosen/tighten twist of the head. :)

There is mode memory, if you wait at least 2 secs after turning the light off before re-activating. Otherwise, you will simply change modes.

There is no strobe or SOS mode on the T10S.

Video:

For information on the light, including the build and user interface, please see my video overview:



Video was recorded in 720p, but YouTube typically defaults to 360p. Once the video is running, you can click on the configuration settings icon and select the higher 480p to 720p options. You can also run full-screen.

As with all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

PWM

There is no sign of PWM at any output level, on any model. The T10S is current-controlled. :)

I did however detect some variable high frequency noise on my sample, on Med and Hi (but not Lo):

T10S-MedNoise.gif


Consistent with my standard review policy, I report on any oscilloscope signals that I can detect in the output of a light. But I can assure you that the above patterns produce no visible effect – even when shining on a fan. The light was "flicker-free" at all levels in my testing.

As mentioned above, there is no strobe or SOS mode on the T10S.

Beamshots:

For white-wall beamshots below, all lights are on Max output on a Sanyo Eneloop NiMH (2000mAh). Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.

T10S-Beam001.jpg
L10-XPG2-Beam001.jpg

MT1A-Ene-Beam001.jpg
E1A-Ene-Beam001.jpg


T10S-Beam002.jpg
L10-XPG2-Beam002.jpg

MT1A-Ene-Beam002.jpg
E1A-Ene-Beam002.jpg


T10S-Beam003.jpg
L10-XPG2-Beam003.jpg

MT1A-Ene-Beam003.jpg
E1A-Ene-Beam003.jpg


T10S-Beam004.jpg
L10-XPG2-Beam004.jpg

MT1A-Ene-Beam004.jpg
E1A-Ene-Beam004.jpg


The T10S has a reasonable beam profile for a 1xAA light. No real surprises here – the T10S has more output and throw than some, less than others. Scroll down to my detailed testing results.

Testing Method:

All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).

T10S-FL1-Summary.gif


The T10S has reasonably bright max output, toward the higher end of my other XP-G/XP-G2 lights. Peak intensity throw is also reasonable, for the size head.

The Lo level is quite low for the class, and is a true "Moonlight" low level.

Let's see an output breakdown for all levels, relative to the specs:

T10S-Lumens.gif


As you can see, my numbers match pretty well to Thrunite's specs. Relative mode spacing is reasonable, although absolute levels are really more of a Moonlight > Med > Hi spacing.

The T10S does not support 14500 Li-ion.

Runtimes

T10S-HiL91.gif


T10S-HiEne.gif


T10S-HiAlka.gif

T10S-MedAlka.gif


Runtime on Hi is within the range of other current-controlled members of this class.

Runtime on Med is excellent for the class.

Potential Issues

Light will roll easily, unless you install the pocket clip.

Stainless steel lights are heavier than aluminum ones in this size (although the T10S is one of the most compact SS lights I've seen).

Lowest level is Moonlight (i.e., there is no typical "Lo" level).

Pressure required on the switch to "soft-press" through output modes takes some getting used to. However, this is still an improvement over most reverse-clicky lights, where it is not possible at all. And twisty control has also thoughtfully been maintained.

14500 (3.7V Li-ion) is not supported.

Preliminary Observations

The T10S is a nice update of the 1xAA T10 from Thrunite. Importantly, you can still use the light as a simple twisty. But you now have clicky switch control as well. Oh, and the build has been completely revamped to a sturdier, brushed stainless steel. :wave:

The clicky switch is interesting. Although it functions as a reverse clicky (i.e., fully press and release to turn on/off), you don't need to do a full "click" to change modes. The ability to "soft press" and release for mode switching is unusual in a reserve clicky (although it does take some practice to get the pressure right for this maneuver). But that's no problem – you can always change modes by a full click, or by the original head twist. It is thoughtful that they kept the contact board isolated from the body, allowing you to use it as a traditional twisty light. :twothumbs

Physically, this is a good design for a stainless steel light, in my opinion. A lot of the time, there really isn't much in the way of grip on these lights (and they can often be a fairly bulky). The T10S is distinctive in that it is still fairly compact, but with a raised head area with fluted indentations to help with grip. This means that you can easily run the light single-handed, twisty-style. :) The only minor recommendation I would make is to raise the profile of the clicky switch a little further (given there is still some tailstanding range withing the lanyard attachment point).

Mode spacing is a little unusual for a 3-stage light (i.e., really more of a Moonlight – "Lowish" Med – Hi sequence). But that's fine with me, since I find the lower levels are what I use the most in an EDC-style 1xAA light.

In terms of output/runtime performance, the current-controlled circuit worked consistently well in my testing. Runtimes are very good for the class, especially on the "Med" level.

Beam pattern is good for a XP-G2 light of this size. No, it is not a heavy thrower, ;) but it does have a bit more throw than a typical slim-lined 1xAA light. No significant beam artifacts or issues on my sample. And the included beam diffuser wand is a nice touch. :)

I'm not usually a big fan of stainless steel lights, as I find aluminum to be solid enough and easier for every day carry and use. But the T10S is a relatively compact offering in this space, with a good range of features and design. Certainly a good choice to consider in this group.

----

T10S provided by Thrunite for review.
 

ven

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Thank you again selfbuilt for a superb in depth review:twothumbs i have one on the way,should be with me this week and cant wait.It will be perfect for my work use and you have put my mind to rest regarding the reverse clicky.I am not a huge fan(just prefer momentary)which helps me in work.However with the head twist to turn on/off (allowing 2 seconds+to avoid mode change) is fantastic news:D as walking from machine to machine checking modules takes 30 seconds easy :thumbsup:The wand will be very useful too for resting inside machinery whilst working for a flood of light:thumbsup:

Thanks again:thumbsup:
 

selfbuilt

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However with the head twist to turn on/off (allowing 2 seconds+to avoid mode change) is fantastic news:D
Yes, it is rare to see a twisty interface maintained in a stainless build. The versatility here is good.

Judging by the operating voltage, a 14505 cell might be an interesting choice for this light.
Hmmm, well, a fresh 14505 would still exceed the voltage range initially. And the extra length could be an issue too. I would want to check with the manufacturer before attempting.

Are there any good lights in this class with a reversible pocket clip?
It is rare to find a good reversible clip in this class.
 

y260

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Reverse clicky switches are a bit of an oddball these days. It seems like the only place I really see them are in budget lights, so I'm a little confused as to the implementation here in a stainless steel light. Perhaps the diameter of the T10s prohibits the use of a forward-clicky?
 

selfbuilt

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Perhaps the diameter of the T10s prohibits the use of a forward-clicky?
That is the most likely explanation. Just about all AAA-size and most thin-style AA lights use reverse clickies. It appears to be an issue with manufacturing forward clickies that small.
 

moldyoldy

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FWIW, in the course of less than a month since purchase of a T10S, I developed sufficient confidence in the light to bring it on some flights. The additional brightness and 'reach' over/above the usual 1xAA light was useful, such as reaching to the next house in a strange neighborhood. I brought the T10S along in lieu of an SC51. The SC51 will be staying home in the future unless I discover a problem with the T10S. I really like the dual interface of tail button and twist action. The twist switching is super easy on my copy, although once in a while I miss a level because of jiggling during walking, etc.

Edit: To date I have not brought Li-Ion lights on flights. only 1xAA or 1xAAA lights which are easily recognizable by all US/European security checkpoints. I do also carry an X-Light (2x2016 Lithium cells). Both Schiphol and Manchester security personnel have asked questions about lights.
 
Last edited:

oKtosiTe

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An AA stainless steel light is heavy to mount on the brim of a cap.
True, but I see plenty of Al lights in the group shot.
Also, it might still beat clipping a Quark X AA2 (a 2xAA light) to a visor, which is what I'm doing now. :D
 

gkbain

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Thanks for another in depth review. As a retired machine shop teacher I always hated machining stainless. The ease of machining, as with all metals, is dependent on the exact alloy composition. Some were not to bad while others were challenging. One thing all stainless alloys have in common is durability and weight. If durability is an issue then stainless will be much more durable than aluminum but much heavier. If weight and durability is an issue then titanium would be a good choice. To my knowledge, stainless and titanium require no after machining coating like aluminum. Some manufactures may coat stainless and titanium as an aesthetic element but I am unsure. 1xAA lights are a good size to edc and are usually have similar output, with a few exceptions. The T10S seems a good choice for a durable edc without the extra cost of titanium and the combination of twisty and clicky is unique.
 

selfbuilt

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As a retired machine shop teacher I always hated machining stainless. The ease of machining, as with all metals, is dependent on the exact alloy composition. Some were not to bad while others were challenging.
Thanks for the input, and the perspective.

One comment I would add is that titanium is challenging for the galling on the screw threads. Not to mention the impact on the pocket book. ;)
 

Glofindel

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Thank you for a great review. I have my eyes on this too. I like the look and UI but it seems to be too heavy for my liking.
I wish it is a AAA light. It'd be wonderful.
 

selfbuilt

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Thank you for a great review. I have my eyes on this too. I like the look and UI but it seems to be too heavy for my liking.
Yes, it is heavier than other slim-lined AA lights - but it's still not unreasonable for the class (i.e., there are a lot of thicker aluminum 1xAA lights that approach the same weight).
 

moldyoldy

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ok, I confess. I was in a hurry and forgot to check pockets. The T10S went thru a full long (50min) cold-water wash cycle. I only discovered it when I wondered why the dryer was making that clunking sound.

Condition post-wash? A quick intial test: turned on the T10S and cycled OK thru all 3 levels. Upon opening the battery tube, a few drops of water were visible at the switch end of the battery tube. No changes visible in the head or reflector.

Refurb consisted of relubing the gasket and swabbing some Deoxit on battery contacts of the PCB in the head. I also tried a very brief squirt of Deoxit into the switch area by inserting the squirt tube into the spring and down into the switch area. No lube came out the bottom on the outside.

Conclusion: not a test I like making, but the T10S passed!
 

ven

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Got my t10s today but not quite right,the button does not always turn on/off and when on it will change modes easily,but once off it wont click on again so hit and miss


Fitting the clip with sausage fingers was fun so i put the little cap heads in the clip 1st


Then easy to fit




Nice solid feel,not too heavy imo,just nicely balanced




t10s next to the d25a ti


Do like it a lot,just need to get to the bottom of this button issue
 

ven

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:D=fixed=:twothumbs
How did i do it? well i............ok i just played with it :laughing: firm presses etc ,maybe something stuck,maybe something stuck in my head :laughing:

As said it was hit and miss turning on,bit of working and it works flawlessly .Love it:D Switch on/off as should,mode select by 1/2 press as should,also as you said selfbuilt with head twist(really useful for me in work)

Happy happy happy:D

Did i say i was happy.........
 

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