Any problem with (quality) plastic lights and extreme cold?

IMA SOL MAN

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So I've been thinking that carrying metal flashlights in the winter is not too comfortable without gloves (I know, I know. Why wouldn't you have gloves on in the winter?), so I'm thinking of carrying plastic lights for the winter instead. My question is, do they get excessively brittle in the cold of winter? I don't want to have my flashlight break if I drop it while changing a tire or some such vital activity in the dark. Input please.
 

ilikeguns40

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I would recommend the Surefire type with nitrolon bodies. The inside of the tube is aluminum for added durability and to create a ground path. Pair that with a metal Surefire head and malkoff drop in and you got yourself a beast of a light

Also if the light is on you, chances are it won't get as cold as the ambient temp is because of your own body heat
 

bigburly912

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I carried a streamlight 4aa on a 2 week hunting trip years ago and the temp range was between 20f and -10 the entire time. It was miserable but the light held up fine and dandy. Still use it today.
 

vicv

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My go to light when it's cold is a stream light polystinger. There's a big difference between a good polycarbonate or glass reinforced nylon, than there is with a hard plastic like a cheap light would have. Those materials are very tough. Tougher than aluminium in a lot of ways
 

Monocrom

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Metal-bodied lights during Winter without gloves on?
Heck, been doing that every Winter for over 20 years without issue.

For polymer-bodied lights, I'd say your best bet would be the models made by SureFire or Streamlight.
 

kaichu dento

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…don't put your tongue on a cold metal light…
This reminds me of breaking snowmachine tracks loose from the ground at really low temps. I'd usually start the engines, then break the track loose and depending on how they were parked, often toss or drag them around to get them in the open and ready to go.
One day I got a firm reminder of the heat exchange difference between steel and aluminum. Most snowmachines have a steel bar in the bumper or cargo rack and aren't that bad to grab onto at -40, but the old Arctic Car Lynx had an aluminum tube back there and I ended up with what looked like actual burns across the insides of my fingers from holding one of them for too long. After that I really paid close attention to how long I'd grab the back of one of them without gloves when it was cold out. Zero, not really a problem, but probably -20 and colder was time to grab quickly, toss, and let go!
Point being, copper and aluminum lights will be the worst when it's cold, while titanium or steel are less bad, and plastic reigns supreme in some conditions.
 

Dave D

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Some plastic (Nitrolon) bodied Surefire lights, of various ages, that were used in different types of conditions and are still fully functioning.

IMG_7095.jpeg
 

vicv

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Nice kx4. I was really surprised when I got mine. Surefire are more for the tactical crowd. And that generally means high lux. But that thing is a flood monster. Wish I had a surefire host to put it in. It has battery and fitment issues in solarforce, lumens factory, and kaidomain bodies
 

DE73

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I received my first plastic light a week ago. I haven't been interested in plastic lights before because I thought they have lower quality feeling. But I really like this one. Much nicer to hold then aluminium even it's only 1 degrees Celsius now.
 

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desert.snake

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You can put a piece of rubber hose over the aluminum and there will be no problems unless, of course, there is a clip installed on the flashlight, which will get in the way
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I have a friend who makes little things to massage himself or aggressive people and also uses rubber hoses for grip
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