Cordless power tools

bykfixer

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I have an 18 volt single string made by Ryobi. It's a dual function number where a twist of the head turns it into a vertical edger. Twist it back for horizontal use.

It's nice and light, well balanced and does ok for edging driveways, sidewalks and fairly light duty roles on low speed. It has a hgh speed setting that guzzles battery but really makes it go. Can do short bursts of heavy trimming in high speed mode.

Low speed I can trim my front and back yard and have enough from a 4Ah battery to use the 18volt blower to clean the driveway etc. All total about 45 minutes of trimming and 15 with the blower.

High speed I can cut through fairly thick grass for about 20 minutes before the same battery demands a refill. You can tell when it gets to near empty because it slows down.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Aug 11, 2003
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my cordless electric chain saw saved the day again today needed to cut some 4x4s to add suport for under home the chain saw did great no or little noise. and cut quickly
 

alpg88

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Apr 19, 2005
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+

Been looking at this air compressor for a year and half, it's brushless > 36V (have batteries)
Finally came down to a price I couldn't pass on, got it for $219


View attachment 53786





I had a perfectly good porter cable 6gal compressor, but that thing was so loud, i could hear it outside, and i live on 13th floor. i tried to put it inside of closet and run it there, every light fixture that was hanging was vibrating, lol, so i got myself kobalt, quiet one with only 2.5gal tank, small tank, but enough for nail guns, staplers, but it is as quiet as a sawing, machine. has dual stage compressor. Your set up, especially the tube frame looks a lot like mine, is your a quiet one too?
 

orbital

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I had a perfectly good porter cable 6gal compressor, but that thing was so loud, i could hear it outside, and i live on 13th floor. i tried to put it inside of closet and run it there, every light fixture that was hanging was vibrating, lol, so i got myself kobalt, quiet one with only 2.5gal tank, small tank, but enough for nail guns, staplers, but it is as quiet as a sawing, machine. has dual stage compressor. Your set up, especially the tube frame looks a lot like mine, is your a quiet one too?
+

I'd say it's quite, does work well
When I first got it, thought the box was slightly heavy, then rightly concluded it's a quality piece of brushless equipment.:)
~ really nice 2 gal.
 

PaladinNO

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I'm on the hunt for a smaller driver. Does anyone have any experiences with the Milwaukee M12 12V line?
Am looking at the Milwaukee M12 BD-202C. Not looking to get into an eco system, this one will be standalone.

Only need a 1/4" bit holder without impact function, as this one won't be used for any drilling or any wood screw above 45mm.
But I need a torque selector, and I am willing to pay the extra cost (in money and weight) for a metal housing, if that exists in this class.

Am already using Dewalt tools (got DCD796, DCD991, DCF899, with DCF887 on the watch list), and I had a DCF601, which was pretty much perfect for my needs - lightweight, well balanced, and was great to use when doing the smaller jobs.

But the DCF601 build quality was terrible. I can understand the weight benefits of using a 100 % plastic gearbox (as opposed to a metal chuck on the larger drills), but something audibly made of plastic has broken off inside it, and the whole thing wobbles in my hand now. Am in the process to do a return.

EDIT:
My DCF601 broke after little over a year of careful use. It hasn't been dropped, ever (unless one fall from standing upright and onto its side on a table counts as "dropped"), and only once used on a single wood screw arguably above its weight class. Other than that, it has remained carefully nestled in its case during transport. Externally, it still looks brand new.
 
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TIFisher

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I'm in the same hunt. Shame about the DCF601. TBH, I've been considering it's predecessor the DCF610 (brushed). It appears a little more svelte, ergonomically speaking. Not sure about the guts being metal or plastic. Problem is, they're getting scarce for NOS units, and overpriced for just a bare tool. I don't need a full kit as I'm already invested in the 12V line. The Milwaukee model you list seems to be an EU item only (?). US version is 2401-20. It's inexpensive enough, but then I would have to kit out for a new power system. I also watched a video review complaining about the chuck, and that the driver was overpowered for precision work with smaller fasteners.
 

alpg88

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Apr 19, 2005
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Dewalt drills fail when you tighten the chuck down too much. They are definitely not tough.
I use dewalt drills for 20 years, never had chuck issues with any, maybe i just know how to use it, but thanks for the heads up,
 

vicv

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I use dewalt drills for 20 years, never had chuck issues with any, maybe i just know how to use it, but thanks for the heads up,
Lmao. Nice attempted dig. I must be very stupid. Not knowing how to tighten a chuck by hand. They just go bad. They do for other people as well. You've gotten lucky.
 

alpg88

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maybe i'm lucky or maybe you got unlucky with your drill.
to tell you the truth, my dewalt as well as milwaukee, do slip chucks when you tighten a bit that is not centered, when 2 out of 3 jaws engauge it feels like it slips, but it is all comes back to normal once you loosen and reposition bit, or a driver, it is a safety feature, maybe an unintended one, but i do not see it as a defect, cuz it works just fine otherwise.
 

vicv

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maybe i'm lucky or maybe you got unlucky with your drill.
to tell you the truth, my dewalt as well as milwaukee, do slip chucks when you tighten a bit that is not centered, when 2 out of 3 jaws engauge it feels like it slips, but it is all comes back to normal once you loosen and reposition bit, or a driver, it is a safety feature, not a defect.
I've found with a few of them that after a few years, the chuck breaks. You spin it CW OR CCT. But it just free spins. It can happen from a perfectly round bit. Maybe they've improved it since then. But I've seen it three times
 

orbital

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Feb 8, 2007
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Location
WI
I'm on the hunt for a smaller driver. Does anyone have any experiences with the Milwaukee M12 12V line?
Am looking at the Milwaukee M12 BD-202C. Not looking to get into an eco system, this one will be standalone.

Only need a 1/4" bit holder without impact function, as this one won't be used for any drilling or any wood screw above 45mm.
But I need a torque selector, and I am willing to pay the extra cost (in money and weight) for a metal housing, if that exists in this class.

Am already using Dewalt tools (got DCD796, DCD991, DCF899, with DCF887 on the watch list), and I had a DCF601, which was pretty much perfect for my needs - lightweight, well balanced, and was great to use when doing the smaller jobs.

But the DCF601 build quality was terrible. I can understand the weight benefits of using a 100 % plastic gearbox (as opposed to a metal chuck on the larger drills), but something audibly made of plastic has broken off inside it, and the whole thing wobbles in my hand now. Am in the process to do a return.

EDIT:
My DCF601 broke after little over a year of careful use. It hasn't been dropped, ever (unless one fall from standing upright and onto its side on a table counts as "dropped"), and only once used on a single wood screw arguably above its weight class. Other than that, it has remained carefully nestled in its case during transport. Externally, it still looks brand new.
+

A small 12V brushless drill would be really nice addition
Clutching makes it much more useful.

you can get genuine Milwaukee batteries on ebay for a good price.

 

alpg88

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Apr 19, 2005
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5,327
maybe defective batch, idk, i never experienced that. have dewalts since early 2000s,
 

PaladinNO

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Jun 22, 2017
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I have had a similar issue with my old Makita drill, where the chuck becomes loose after repeated opening and closing. However, where Makita had sensibly put a regular slotted screw to retighten the chuck, Dewalt have used some weird star-shaped screw. Looks similar to a Torx 20.

Speaking of issue with Dewalt tools, I am having that exact issue with the chuck on my Dewalt DCD796. So I am in the process of returning that one too as we speak / type. The whole chuck currently moves elliptically. Bought the DCD796 October last year, so it practically hasn't seen any use at all.
I made a video clip of the issue and sent to the E-tailer, and they were basically like "oh s**t, that ain't right. Here's a return shipping label."

As for the Milwaukee, I think I am settled on the M12 Fuel CD/0. Can't for the life of me find a local version with batteries and charger included though, only the bare tool. Pity, as combo packages are usually the better deal than buying them separately. Also a claimed all-metal gear housing, and is basically the driver version of the Milwaukee 3403-20 drill mentioned above. But I've decided to postpone any purchase, given I will have 2 pending warranty returns / repairs.
 

alpg88

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I have that the same dewalt drill, 3 speed, with 3 mode light at the base, so far so good, it does slip when i tighten it, like i described before, but otherwise, no complaints. T be honest i still like older model better, the one with 3 speed and 18v nicd, and metal gearbox body, amount of torque it had, it would snap heads off 3/8 bolts, but it was bulky and very heavy compared to DCD796. the 18v 2.4ah battery alone was as heavy as 6ah li ion,
 

PaladinNO

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@alpg88 If you're looking for torque, or should ever require more force than the DCD796 can provide, then I can heartily recommend the DCF899 impact wrench. I once had to resort to that monster, when even my DCD991 didn't want to get the last few mm's of a 160mm wood screw in, while simultaneously wanting to break my wrist. 950 Nm worked wonders where 95 Nm failed.

However, the DCF899 is just pure overkill on screws though. Bought it only because I wanted an impact wrench when changing wheels on my car, and I got a great price on it. But when combined with Dewalt DT7508-QZ impact hex adapter and Dewalt DT70734T-QZ impact torsion bits, the DCF899 will drive any screw into anything. The DCF887 would be more sensible for the biggest screws, but...it's kinda fun to have the tools when you're at the "this is not a request" stage of things. ^^
 
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alpg88

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@alpg88 If you're looking for torque, or should ever require more force than the DCD796 can provide, then I can heartily recommend the DCF899 torque wrench. I once had to resort to that monster, when even my DCD991 didn't want to get the last few mm's of a 160mm wood screw in, while simultaneously wanting to break my wrist. 950 Nm worked wonders where 95 Nm failed.

However, the DCF899 is just pure overkill on screws though. Bought it only because I wanted a torque wrench when changing wheel on my car, and I got a great price on it. But when combined with Dewalt DT7508-QZ impact hex adapter and Dewalt DT70734T-QZ impact torsion bits, the DCF899 will drive any screw into anything. The DCF887 would be more sensible for the biggest screws, but...it's kinda fun to have the tools when you're at the "this is not a request" stage of things. ^^
Same here, I have a milwaukee 1/2in impact wrench, 1000/1400ft-lbs. I use it for when I need to remove wheels, thou i use 100ft-lbs torque limit bar when I tightening lugnuts. I was removing a bottom bracket from a bike once, completely forgot it had a left thread, sheered the threads with that wrench faster than i realized, lol good thing i did not need them for a new part.
 

PaladinNO

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Same here, I have a milwaukee 1/2in impact wrench, 1000/1400ft-lbs. I use it for when I need to remove wheels, thou i use 100ft-lbs torque limit bar when I tightening lugnuts.
Heck yeah, then you already know what I'm talking about! Get yourself one of those 1/2" socket - 1/4" hex adapters, and you got the end of all things drill when doing the bigger wood screws. I think this is the Milwaukee equivalent:

I got a Bahco torsion bar when tightening the lug nuts. I didn't even know such things existed until way after aquiring the impact wrench.
Bought the one that's below the recommended torque setting for my alloys, so I can do the final rotation manually with a torque click wrench.

Top tip, if you're not already doing it: get a stubby screwdriver to manually enter the threads with the lug nut correctly before trying to tighten them with the impact wrench. Much easier to get the lug nut in than using the hand if your rims have a narrow recess for the nuts. Any cheap stubby will do (found a stubby to give a better feel compared to a full length screw driver), together a cheap extra lug nut socket and with one of these:
Or the Dewalt DW2547IR. Or any cheap equivalent, as there won't be any force applied on this to just manually enter the threads. 👍
 
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