Specialty Tools

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,564
Location
Dust in the Wind
A specialty tool for storing masonry twine.
IMG_1399.jpeg

Beats using a stick.

And an old school underground utility locator
IMG_1398.jpeg


IMG_1400.jpeg

Swivel antenna inside a bicycle grip.

And in the flashlight world.....
IMG_1401.jpeg

A rechargeable light that plugs into the 12v accessory port.
 

PhotonWrangler

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,512
Location
In a handbasket

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,564
Location
Dust in the Wind
You hold the handle vertically and when it works (because it doesn't work for everyone) the antenna points forward away from your body. When you get near an interuption in the earth's something or other, be it magnetic field, protons and neutrons or whatever it is, the antenna turns to a right angle. You can use a pair of copper coat hangers bent to an L shape, (one in each hand) to do the same thing.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,444
Location
Northern New Jersey
You hold the handle vertically and when it works (because it doesn't work for everyone) the antenna points forward away from your body. When you get near an interuption in the earth's something or other, be it magnetic field, protons and neutrons or whatever it is, the antenna turns to a right angle. You can use a pair of copper coat hangers bent to an L shape, (one in each hand) to do the same thing.
I wondered if it was like a divining rod.
 

KITROBASKIN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
5,490
Location
New Mexico, USA
You hold the handle vertically and when it works (because it doesn't work for everyone) the antenna points forward away from your body. When you get near an interuption in the earth's something or other, be it magnetic field, protons and neutrons or whatever it is, the antenna turns to a right angle. You can use a pair of copper coat hangers bent to an L shape, (one in each hand) to do the same thing.
Standing with fixer on this one because he is willing to inform at the expense of some criticism.

If you believe it does not work, you are very likely right that it will not work for you.

A retired electrical engineer from Sandia Labs let me use his brass brazing rods bent to make a short handle. Index finger under the right angle part and dorsal side of little finger near the bottom of the handle area.

He (and I subsequently) used it to find where buried water lines needed to be crossed with some other buried line (electrical or septic for instance). I did use it to dowse a location to drill a well and did get consistent results but of course can't say whether it truly made a difference.

I also found a buried wellhead once but also got a couple false positives at that time. For me the brazing rods cross each other when walking over where the underground pipe is, uncrossing after passing. I always repeat the process because some times you'll get a false reading if your hands are not kept plumb.

 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,564
Location
Dust in the Wind
Now I'm going to say something even more hard to believe. I didn't until I saw it for myself.

When it crosses you stomp the ground until it straightens out. The numbers of stomps tells you within a few inches how deep it is. Seriously.

A guy showed a bunch of us at work day that trick then got everybody to try it. For some the rods would cross each other, some spread away from each other. Some it would be both turned left or right. He said after we were done "if the cross each other you make boy babies. Spread away from each other, girls. Both turn same direction you make both..... thing is each person where they crossed other has sons, spread apart daughters and turned same way had both sons and daughters.

Of course for a couple of folks they didn't do anything. But when he stomped the ground 4 times and the waterline was 4' deep..... holy smokes. And btw they cross over each other for me and I have 2 sons.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,564
Location
Dust in the Wind
IMG_1538.jpeg

Staple gun. Self powered with forward trigger.

Needed a T50 stapler to nail down some astro turf on a doggy handicap ramp. This US made tool works great at putting down staples..... at least for a few minutes anyway. Then it stopped "cocking". No jamming, just wouldn't re-lock the trigger for the next staple. It seems as though they are hit or miss badly. Like 1 out of 10 are a dud according to reviews. Most loved them. Enough said they stop working to cause me to think there's a design or build issue with the newer version. I got the dud.

I finished the job with my 1980's Arrow T50
IMG_1545.jpeg

Much more recoil than the Powershot and requires more effort to push the trigger but it's reliable as sunshine.


I took back the Powershot and traded for...
IMG_1537.jpeg

The Craftsman push fire.
It's a plastic body number with more recoil than the Arrow brand but it keeps firing staple after staple. I shot a reel of staples with it and no issues. And the mechanism to fill it up is a super easy to use set up.

The front fire staple gun is way easier to use. The little window lets you know you have some staples left and the arrow on the side makes for precision stapling as well. The Arrow one is way more user friendly than the Craftsman but hey, if it doesn't staple who cares how easy it is to handle, right?
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,444
Location
Northern New Jersey
Great tool!
I had one that would fire either flat crown staples, or rounded crown staples. I think it was an arrow, but it may not have been.

The rounded crown option is great when running land line phone wiring, or hard wired internet cabling.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,564
Location
Dust in the Wind
I saw how the fire department used to drain their hoses after a fire and just do that. Lay the hose out flat in a straight line, lift up one end and let gravity take it from there. But the air hose fitting is a good idea. Much faster than the fire department method.
 
Top