Have you chosen one brand's power-tools platform?

Monocrom

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If you have, please tell us which one, and why.
Or, if not one, is there one that dominates your garage or workshop?
I chose Ryobi for affordability, and being a DIYer at best. Little use during the year.

Though won't lie. THIS bothers me....
 

orbital

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Never purchased a power tool locally, just always found the best deals online.
I'm a bit of a goof, in that I have a few different brands, doesn't make a ton of sense on the battery aspect, but that's fine with me.

Have more Hitachi/Metabo than anything else, DeWalt may feel the best in hand,
Milwaukee has its headquarters ~ design building just south of me about an hour.

Everything I have in cordless tools are brushless
 

iacchus

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I rock the teal, mostly because they have the best battery management in the business.
A lot of the other offerings have the BM in the tool, but on Makita it's in the battery, so if you choose to use the batteries to power something like this, you don't have to rely on whatever the 3rd party put in there to keep you kosher.

Then there's the design philosophy, which is much like Toyota. Stick with what works and make small incremental improvements. Any big change is generally incredibly well vetted (w/ some notable exceptions). They are incredibly robust tools that are pretty hard to kill. Plus, they have the best vibration dampening in the business, bar none. I appreciate this more and more as I get older and my wrists and thumbs yell at me after a day's work sometimes.

Then there is the ability to actually repair the tools. I've worked w/ power tools for enough decades now to know that no matter the quality, if you use the thing enough, it will fail at some point. Just the nature of the beast, it's not a matter of when, but how often.
You can repair a Milwaukee tool, but the part to do it is more often than not almost as expensive as the tool itself, and half the time it is not designed to make the swap-in of a new part in any way easy. While I wouldn't go so far as calling them disposable, they get close. Dewalt I consider disposable for all but their most expensive offerings.
Trigger for your Makita hammer drill? $6. And it's on barrel connectors in there, so swapping in a new one is maybe a 15 minute job.

Makita's parent company? Makita. 'Nuff said there.

They tend to be a bit more expensive than the other options (except Milwaukee, whose prices are somewhat absurd), they aren't the most high in horsepower (but I've never felt undergunned using one), they have an absolute crap modular toolbox offering (which is whatever, it's a box, they don't have to match.), their battery operated framing nailers are ungodly bad, so use Metabo there (but Makita just fixed this and the proper ones should be on the market soon).
It isn't all butterflies and rainbows, but taken on the whole, I'm super happy w/ their line of products and have been more than satisfied with every purchase I have from them.

I do a lot of mid-level carpentry more often than I'd like, but hiring it out is outlandishly expensive and to be honest, I don't completely trust other's work anyway. So, saving $10K on a new complete floor or $20K on a new roof? An easy decision to make while I have the youth in me and the tools at hand.
I generally do one or two big jobs a year on my home or one of my family's houses. We all help each other, so nobody has to shoulder it solo. What I'm saying here is that these aren't used for light DIY service. I buy contractor grade tools because I'm often up against that sort of work and need them. The savings of doing it myself make the sticker pain of the tools not so bad.

Then there's my woodshop. That's a whole thing unto itself. A lot more corded options in there, though.
 

orbital

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Mentioned this tool more than once for good reason,,
Just used it the other day on a drowned tree branch along with a pair of loppers (chain saw would have been overkill for alot of it)
Whenever I use the saw, it blows me away on being the right tool for the job

Dewalt's Compact Recip Saw
 

Monocrom

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Must admit, I'm looking to add a compact recip. saw to my tool-box.
Ryobi makes one that is pretty compact. But it's likely underpowered.
Especially compared to that very tempting Dewalt model.
 

iacchus

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I use the everlovin' crap out of this one:

Paired w/ some Diablo carbide blades, it works incredibly well. I sheared through twenty or so 2x6 treated joists with it just a couple weeks ago, but bought it for limb lopping w/ a 12" blade.

I am 100% in agreement for a solid recip-saw over chainsaw for limbs and such. Much easier work.

I hear good things about this one too:

but haven't had need for the form factor, so haven't used one.

The big ones for metal and the like, I grab a corded beast.
 

Monocrom

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Those Diablo Carbide blades are incredible! Practically cut through anything.

Also, now I know where Ryobi got the inspiration for their compact recip. saw design.
 

orbital

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I use Diablo blades also, doubt I'll use anything else.
Have a couple different types

The general purpose nail embedded wood one simply gets it done.
 
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More years ago than I can remember, I needed a cordless drill to install many many mini blinds. Since all of the work was going to be overhead, I wanted the smallest one I could find that had a belt hook and could also stand upright.

This was my choice and second cordless tool.
IMAG0714.jpg


Sometime later, these were on sale.
IMAG0721.jpg


In for a penny ...
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In for a pound.
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IMG_5324.JPG


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OK, It's not a DeWALT, but it is the right color, cordless, and it's awesome!
64972621668__B5DDEFD6-8E39-4152-8D61-B97ED34D6590.JPG
 

letschat7

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I used to be into Bosch way back in the day because they were Swiss, German, or USA made. When they started outsourcing I hopped onto Dewalt USA/Czech in 2016. I'll post pics later.
 

ghostguy6

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I'm a Milwaukee guy now. They are expensive but they can take the abuse. I found their batteries have a life span far longer than any other brand. I'm still using 12v 2amp batteries I purchased in 2009. They also have the largest selection of tools.

I used to use Dewalt but the batteries never lasted more than a few years and the drills burnt out. My M12 drill outperforms the Dewalt 20V every time.
 

Monocrom

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i buy rigid but ill buy anything if the deal is good lol
I hear you. Most folks find it easier standardizing on one brand for all or most of their needs. That way, no need to buy a new charger and new battery when you buy a tool that doesn't come with a charger or battery.
 

Monocrom

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I'm a Milwaukee guy now. They are expensive but they can take the abuse. I found their batteries have a life span far longer than any other brand. I'm still using 12v 2amp batteries I purchased in 2009. They also have the largest selection of tools.
As far as selection, I think Ryobi has Milwaukee beat on that one aspect. Still amazes me that both brands belong to the same parent company though.
 

raggie33

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my weed trimer is 80 volts mst time im just babying it. it has that much power it can cut anything. and low noise
 

letschat7

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I'm a Milwaukee guy now. They are expensive but they can take the abuse. I found their batteries have a life span far longer than any other brand. I'm still using 12v 2amp batteries I purchased in 2009. They also have the largest selection of tools.

I used to use Dewalt but the batteries never lasted more than a few years and the drills burnt out. My M12 drill outperforms the Dewalt 20V every time.
The 18650s inside any battery pack are probably the same.
 

iacchus

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As far as selection, I think Ryobi has Milwaukee beat on that one aspect. Still amazes me that both brands belong to the same parent company though.
Ryobi is also the only one to make a real commitment to keeping old batteries future compatible w/ new models.
People like to dog on Ryobi, but they're a solid, sensible choice for a lot of people and make a good product.
 
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Just a quick thing, the cordless trimmer.
Everyone loves it, except for the head.
Good news! ECHO Speedfeed head.
Screws directly onto the trimmer.
Fantastic replacement.
My only issue with the trimmer is I'm unable to edge with it. Having the motor placed at the business end makes it impossible for me to see what needs to be done. The few times I tried, it L@@Ked like Stevie Wonder did them.
Image.jpg
 
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