Heat damaged reflector from osram 623?

vestureofblood

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Hey all,

I have a M*g 623 that uses a fivemega new gen mop reflector, and I was testing my run times the other night, and I let it run for several minutes longer than I have before. Now my reflector looks like it may be damaged. It looks heavily oxidized and even the tint of the light looks off. Is there any way to remove the haze or am I just out a reflector?
 

choppers

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Aug 13, 2006
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AZ
Hey all,

I have a M*g 623 that uses a fivemega new gen mop reflector, and I was testing my run times the other night, and I let it run for several minutes longer than I have before. Now my reflector looks like it may be damaged. It looks heavily oxidized and even the tint of the light looks off. Is there any way to remove the haze or am I just out a reflector?
I dont think you can remove the haze...I believe that the problem is the coating at high temps on most reflectors...someone more qualified could probably give you a better answer...
 

tebore

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Sounds like you cooked the coating. I had that happen to one of my reflectors. Trying to clean it just takes the whole coating off. I don't know who made it as I was the second owner.

Strangely the reflectors I got from KD or was it DX are still holding up.
 

LuxLuthor

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What brand of reflector is it? I'm sure you cooked to coating. It's nearly impossible to do anything with reflector coatings without ruining the finish.
 

vestureofblood

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What brand of reflector is it? I'm sure you cooked to coating. It's nearly impossible to do anything with reflector coatings without ruining the finish.

Its one of the Fievemega new gen hybrids. ( I would also like to mention this is clearly NOT a product defect) I was really pushing things to the limit trying to test a particular type of cells for durability and run time.
 

LuxLuthor

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I have always had great performance and durability with FM's reflectors, but as you say if you push the limits almost all reflectors will show heat damage. Once damaged from bulb heat or physical contact, unfortunately it is almost impossible to recover original reflector coating.

Consider yourself fortunate that it was not a 2.5" or 3" model--$$$
 

Gryloc

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Cincinnati, Ohio & North Lewisburg, Ohio
vestureofblood,

Sorry for your loss there. I cannot imagine the amount of heat that is required to oxidize the aluminum coating. Can I ask how many watts you were pushing through the bulb?

Well, if you were planning on throwing the damaged reflector away, would you mind giving it to me instead? I can pay for whatever you need or want in order to take it off of your hands. I was interested in a large reflector like this for experimentation, even if it does not reflect light any. I would appreciate it. Thank you!

-Tony
 

rdh226

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Nashua, NH, USA
Don't give up hope just yet.

It may not be heat coloring (wait, does Al heat color? Or just melt?), but rather just volatile cook-off deposits.

Yeah, bummer in any case, but... there are several things to try. First, warm soapy water (dish washing
detergent, like Ivory, anything without lanolin/hand-softening products, perfume, and other such pollutants).
Get sink (bowl, whatever) nice and mixed/sudsy, then swoosh the reflector in the sudsy water (good,
vigorous agitation). Do NOT touch the reflector surface, you just want soapy water impact to do all the
work,without scratching the surface. An Ultrasonic cleaner would be ideal for this! (Damn, I knew there
was a reason I wanted to buy one...). If soapy water doesn't work, try the same (general) idea with Alcohol
or any other convenient organic solvent/cleaner you may handy. WARNING: while water and alcohol
are relatively benign, almost everything else in the world is hazardous to your body chemistry: WEAR
GLOVES (rubber/chemical-resistant). Carbon Tet, Ampex Tape Head Cleaner (AMAZING stuff, but...),
etc. can all do quite a number on your biochemistry; a mere flashlight reflector is not that important!

If the whatever doesn't clean off, then try again (soapy water, alcohol, other escalating chem warfare
agents) but this time use a Q-Tip (cotton swab) and ever so gently draw the Q-Tip from the inside to the
outer edge of the reflector ONCE, rinse, and see if that helped any. If that does work, then you can procede
to try cleaning the whole reflector with the Q-Tip(whatever) being as gentle as possible. You WILL scratch
the reflector, but if you're gentle the scratches will be more esthetic than problematical -- they make look
OhMyGawdHorrible, but probably won't make any RealWorld(tm) difference in the reflected beam pattern. It will
most affect smooth/shiny reflector for max throw, and least affect MOP/HOP/Stippled reflectors for floodier
beam spread.

Given that the reflector is already "destroyed" (that's a value judgement for you to make), there isn't any real
harm is scrubbing more aggressively (above steps) to see if you can scrub the haze/whatever off, just as a
reference point.

Another alternative you might try (short of aggressive scrubbing) is any of the spray cleaners (BrakeClean(tm)
alt BrakeKleen(tm) is pretty handy for removing stuff that shouldn't be there, but again you don't want to in-
hale or otherwise ingest any more of it than you can avoid).

Good Luck!

-RDH
 

vestureofblood

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Joined
Jun 19, 2008
Messages
3,211
Location
Missouri
I have always had great performance and durability with FM's reflectors, but as you say if you push the limits almost all reflectors will show heat damage. Once damaged from bulb heat or physical contact, unfortunately it is almost impossible to recover original reflector coating.

Consider yourself fortunate that it was not a 2.5" or 3" model--$$$
Your right Lux, I guess it is best that I leaned this with a 30$ reflector and not a 130$. When I was brand new here I learned what happens when you dont get wa1185s clean before use with a KD reflector too:crackup:

vestureofblood,

Sorry for your loss there. I cannot imagine the amount of heat that is required to oxidize the aluminum coating. Can I ask how many watts you were pushing through the bulb?

100 watt osram 64623.

Well, if you were planning on throwing the damaged reflector away, would you mind giving it to me instead? I can pay for whatever you need or want in order to take it off of your hands. I was interested in a large reflector like this for experimentation, even if it does not reflect light any. I would appreciate it. Thank you!

I am going to continue to try to revive it, however should I get rid of It I will remember you.

-Tony

Don't give up hope just yet.

It may not be heat coloring (wait, does Al heat color? Or just melt?), but rather just volatile cook-off deposits.

Yeah, bummer in any case, but... there are several things to try. First, warm soapy water (dish washing
detergent, like Ivory, anything without lanolin/hand-softening products, perfume, and other such pollutants).
Get sink (bowl, whatever) nice and mixed/sudsy, then swoosh the reflector in the sudsy water (good,
vigorous agitation). Do NOT touch the reflector surface, you just want soapy water impact to do all the
work,without scratching the surface. An Ultrasonic cleaner would be ideal for this! (Damn, I knew there
was a reason I wanted to buy one...). If soapy water doesn't work, try the same (general) idea with Alcohol
or any other convenient organic solvent/cleaner you may handy. WARNING: while water and alcohol
are relatively benign, almost everything else in the world is hazardous to your body chemistry: WEAR
GLOVES (rubber/chemical-resistant). Carbon Tet, Ampex Tape Head Cleaner (AMAZING stuff, but...),
etc. can all do quite a number on your biochemistry; a mere flashlight reflector is not that important!

If the whatever doesn't clean off, then try again (soapy water, alcohol, other escalating chem warfare
agents) but this time use a Q-Tip (cotton swab) and ever so gently draw the Q-Tip from the inside to the
outer edge of the reflector ONCE, rinse, and see if that helped any. If that does work, then you can procede
to try cleaning the whole reflector with the Q-Tip(whatever) being as gentle as possible. You WILL scratch
the reflector, but if you're gentle the scratches will be more esthetic than problematical -- they make look
OhMyGawdHorrible, but probably won't make any RealWorld(tm) difference in the reflected beam pattern. It will
most affect smooth/shiny reflector for max throw, and least affect MOP/HOP/Stippled reflectors for floodier
beam spread.

Given that the reflector is already "destroyed" (that's a value judgement for you to make), there isn't any real
harm is scrubbing more aggressively (above steps) to see if you can scrub the haze/whatever off, just as a
reference point.

Another alternative you might try (short of aggressive scrubbing) is any of the spray cleaners (BrakeClean(tm)
alt BrakeKleen(tm) is pretty handy for removing stuff that shouldn't be there, but again you don't want to in-
hale or otherwise ingest any more of it than you can avoid).

Good Luck!

-RDH

RDH, thanks for the suggestions, the alcohol was my first though, I may try some others, if any work I will post.

Thanks again.
 

tebore

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 10, 2006
Messages
2,141
Location
Toronto, Ontario. CAN.
Your right Lux, I guess it is best that I leaned this with a 30$ reflector and not a 130$. When I was brand new here I learned what happens when you dont get wa1185s clean before use with a KD reflector too:crackup:





RDH, thanks for the suggestions, the alcohol was my first though, I may try some others, if any work I will post.

Thanks again.

DO NOT USE ALCOHOL. Most coatings are vacuum applied, and the lesser coatings don't have a "finish/sealing" coat. Alcohol will just break down the think Vacuumed film.
 

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