Knife Chatter. Show and Tell!

nbp

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Updated automatics picture. I really love carrying OTFs in addition to what I like to call "heavy folders".

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nbp

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Here you are not quite right, Puma and Fiskars great knives :) Puma still in this state is expensive, on the back of the castle I see the number, but it’s bad if you enter it here, you will know when it was made https://www.pumaknives.de/en/faqs


Sergey, I never did thank you for setting me straight on this! I thought these were just cheap things, that I would keep only out of nostalgia for grandpa. But you are right. I did some research and this Puma Game Warden was made in 1972, and was about $30 way back then! The current models of this knife are over $200. Apparently these were made quite well. My grandpa found this one on the side of the road while walking the dog many years ago. This one is very tarnished and the blade is scratched to heck so it would not fetch the most collectible prices now but that's okay I will keep it anyways. I would like to get it cleaned up and polished a bit though; I think it could be a very nice folder to have. The Fiskars in the middle doesn't seem to be anything too special, but a nice sharp bushcraft knife. However the puukko style knife on the top is more special than I thought too. It was made by a Finnish cutlery company called Hackman, and this puukko was designed by a famous Finnish artist/designer named Tapio Wirrkala. This one is also pretty tattered, but in good condition these old knives are pretty desirable too and can fetch even $150 or more. I plan to keep this one too, but I would like to polish this one up a bit. Since I have Finnish heritage it is neat to have a traditional style Finnish style knife also. I need to do some research on the best ways to attack these projects. But who knew? I thought these were mostly just junky knives at first but they are actually things people even today are collecting! You were quite right my friend!

A couple other pictures.

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5S8Zh5

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A catch and release traditional: Bulldog 1st Generation Coal Miner Stockman, brown jigged bone and carbon steel.

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Random Dan

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Well I finally joined the CRK mafia. I've been eyeing a small 31 ever since I first saw pictures of them, as I like the pocket clip and lack of unnecessary hole in the handle, but I held off due to reports of lock geometry problems. Then I came across a small pj 21 for sale for $250 and I decided to give it a try. If I end up liking it enough I might get a 31 down the road.
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And here it is next to some of its main competition for "favorite ~7" ti framelock", a title which is surprisingly competitive in my collection.
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L-R: Monterey Bay Knives EZC 2.0, Sharp By Design Micro Evo Typhoon, Pena X-Series Zulu, CRK Small Sebenza 21.

It's hard to pick a favorite. I love the traditional styling of the Pena, and since it has optional nail nick opening I can hand it to someone and they can at least figure out how to open it. The Typhoon has the best pocket clip of any knife I've ever owned, I like how the holes in the handle provide a super solid grip, and the flipping action is excellent. The EZC has a super clean look and I love marveling at the machining of the one-piece handle, plus it slices really well with the full flat grind. All of them are reasonable thin behind the edge and cut very well, in addition to having essentially flawless fit and finish.

It remains to be seen how the Sebenza will fit in, but so far I like the hollow ground blade and it definitely makes the best sound when it opens. I'll probably take it apart to remove the lanyard and add some more tension to the pocket clip before carrying it again.
 

Alexlight

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My last purchase connected with knives was ordering of a professional meat slicer. Anyway, it was a good choice. I'm not sure how often I will use it, but now I'm satisfied completely. I feel myself a pro chef while using this slicer.
 
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:duh2:I EDC 2 Knives one for work and one for my civvy time.
I love my Boker Breacher its a cheap under $40 440a Tanto design with a stonewash blade. I have used it as prybar, log splitter, general hacker and slicer, dropped it on concrete, even ate poop at 20mph riding my Boosted Board Mini X, the direct hit and slide didn’t even damage the kydex sheath or G10 handles.
In my personal time, I carry a Benchmade Model 42 Springer with 154cm blade, considered by many as a Holy Grail 😇
I can’t explain how much I enjoy this Balisong its a fabled model 42 , Titanium Channel handles, and upgraded with Phosphorus Bronze washers what else needs to be said.
I flip the 42 regularly and recently sent it in for a spa day at Benchmade, otherwise I don’t cut anything with it, and its mainly for amusement but its not dull just in case.



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Modernflame

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These two knives represent my third and fourth attempts to love the Spyderco PM2. I have finally succeeded. I found fault with the first two PM2s, even after a preliminary use of the Para 3, because the knives are difficult to disassemble. That, and I was eager as an enthusiast to try different things. Having been around the block, I recognize the superiority of this model as a cutting tool and I forgive its former sins. Both of these before you are Bento Box Shop exclusives. The green handled knife is in K390, and the lovely blue one is in M390. While I regard the PM2 as a masterpiece of engineering, I must add that both blades are slightly off center. This is difficult to accept due to the price and the tenure of this knife. Spyderco ought to have perfected assembly by now. Also, the factory edge on the M390 version came with a visible burr running two thirds the length of the blade. If I were not a well equipped sharpening hobbyist, I would be disappointed, but alas, perfect factory edges are rare. Apart from those flaws, I am delighted with both purchases. Spyderco's genius lies not only in the design, but in the multiplicity of steel options. The PM2 is a knife nerd's sandbox, currently having easily available options in S30V, S35VN, S110V, K390, M390, and Maxamet, to say nothing of other sprint runs in 10V, 204P, Rex45 and others. I'm quite happy with a PM2 in my pocket, although I do worry about rust affecting the nested steel liners. Because disassembly is a challenge, I can't readily clean and lubricate them. If moisture is able to seep in between the G10 and the steel liners, then my logic is that EDCi can also. Thus, I have made every effort to saturate the area with this anti-corrosive, in hopes that it will ward off rust forever. According to YouTube lore, some have said that the PM2 is the Buck 110 of our generation. I do not know whether that has been asserted or by whom, but the logic holds true for me.

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xxo

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Well finally got a Cold Steel Finn Hawk that I have wanted for some time. Glad I did, the Finn Hawk seems nicer than my Mora Clipper and Swedish Army knife, has a nice solid feel to it with a very comfortable handle. Came shaving sharp, but not TP slicing sharp - a quick trip to the Sharpmaker should fix that. A lot of people have complained that the sheath is too tight but I like it a little tight since I will carry this more in a bag than on my belt and I don't want it coming out of the sheath. I always worry about this with the Clipper sheathes which I usually secure with a ranger band or even 100 MPH tape to keep them coming out of the sheath in a pack. If I intended to carry the Finn Hawk or a Mora for extended periods on a belt I would get a better sheath.
 

Modernflame

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Came shaving sharp, but not TP slicing sharp - a quick trip to the Sharpmaker should fix that.

It is a fine knife. Actually, I didn't know it existed until now, so thank you for introducing me. Will the Sharpmaker not produce a micro bevel on your scandi grind?
 

xxo

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It is a fine knife. Actually, I didn't know it existed until now, so thank you for introducing me. Will the Sharpmaker not produce a micro bevel on your scandi grind?


Yup it will. I am not a big fan of the so called "scandi" grind for most things. These edge grinds are used a lot on cheap knives and machetes because the manufacture does not have to grind the blade, just the edge. Some people like these edges for wood working and because they find them easy to get the angle right when sharpening free hand. I find that "scandi" edges chip and roll a lot and you need to take off a bunch of metal each time you sharpen. I find that I can get them sharper on the sharpmaker very easily and that the edge lasts longer.
 

Modernflame

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This is my new Sebenza 21 ( I have my doubts about the 31).

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I've come full circle. After spending untold, spousally bereaved funds on my flashlight addiction, I was determined to explore pocket knives more frugally. I failed.

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The first concept was to buy a Chris Reeve Inkosi, name it the ultimate, then relax, quite secure in the knowledge that I had a superior knife. Then I wanted to pursue super steels. Chasing theoretical cuts per edge, I find, is like flashaholics chasing lumens. Just not a race for me. Afterward, I became a geometry snob. This leads me back to the Sebenza. Is s35vn a super steel? No, not by modern standards. However, the deep hollow grind and generous sharpening choil promise a long service life without thickening up. Combine the pivot bushing and the end user serviceability, and there's no struggle with thread locker or blade centering.

Given the infamously tight tolerances of CRK knives, the edge on this specimen serves as comic relief. The convex shape aside, this one is so uneven that the tip looks bent. One side is about 22 dps, while the other is about 18. These people claim to fuss over one tenth of a thousandth of an inch, but they can't build a jig for the knife sharpening dude? Well, at least they didn't burn the edge of this one. I can fix the rest, although I must say that as a knife sharpener, I would never allow this to leave my workbench.

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For a closer look:

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bigburly912

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I never understood the love for the Chris reeve knives. I had a local knife store show me a few samples and I found a similar looking tip on a few samples. Not one of them, many of them. I can’t justify the money.
 

Modernflame

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I never understood the love for the Chris reeve knives. I had a local knife store show me a few samples and I found a similar looking tip on a few samples. Not one of them, many of them. I can’t justify the money.


They are certainly not for everyone, bro. Are they worth the cost in terms of materials per dollar? No, obviously not. Personally, I think the sum of the parts is greater than the list of ingredients. The edge is easy enough for me to fix, but I can see why they would be a disappointment for other folks.
 

nbp

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Is the whole blade that uneven side compared to side or just that smidge on the tip? I would agree that a pro should do a much better job than that, but I always struggle with sharpening the tips on my knives and can see how they can get a little off kilter at the very point. I think their Insingo blade is the best ever and much prefer it to the clip point but that’s another topic. I’m sure if you contact them and send it in to the spa they will resharpen that for you. It sucks, but nothing made by people is perfect 100% of the time.
 

Modernflame

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Are you gowning to contact Reeves re your issue?

Bill

Nah, they'd only put it back on the belt grinder and remove a lot more steel. I've forgiven as much from other manufacturers (e.g. Spyderco and Benchmade). Since I have a Wicked Edge, it's a simple trick to measure the angles and balance it out. My purpose was to report honestly about this imprecision in the midst of superior build quality.

Is the whole blade that uneven side compared to side or just that smidge on the tip?

It's the whole edge. I see the same disparity at the heel, although I'm aware that the factory sharpener must change angles near the belly in order to maintain an even bevel height as the blade thickness increases toward the tip. The tip is oddly shaped, even from a profile view. Again, it's hardly worth sending it in when I have the means to fix it at home.

Edit: I've rarely met a perfectly executed factory edge. Microtech has come close. Bark River knives tend to be exceptional. Apart from that I expect that new knives will need aftermarket treatment.
 
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xxo

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Well finally got a Cold Steel Finn Hawk that I have wanted for some time. Glad I did, the Finn Hawk seems nicer than my Mora Clipper and Swedish Army knife, has a nice solid feel to it with a very comfortable handle. Came shaving sharp, but not TP slicing sharp - a quick trip to the Sharpmaker should fix that. A lot of people have complained that the sheath is too tight but I like it a little tight since I will carry this more in a bag than on my belt and I don't want it coming out of the sheath. I always worry about this with the Clipper sheathes which I usually secure with a ranger band or even 100 MPH tape to keep them coming out of the sheath in a pack. If I intended to carry the Finn Hawk or a Mora for extended periods on a belt I would get a better sheath.


Update: I have had the Finn Hawk for over 7 months and the more I use it the more I like it - it really is an outstanding knife. Cuts much better than I expected and the handle shape is very comfortable and secure, though I would prefer plain hard plastic for the handle without the rubber overmold (Cold Steel has always used a lot of rubber handles, one of the things I am not a fan of).

The plastic sheath is OK for what it is, basically something to stick in a pack or to rig up as a neck knife, but for belt carry it definitely deserves a better sheath.
 
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