Maglite 4 D cell ML300L

IMA SOL MAN

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May 18, 2023
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The HEART of the USA.
The extention tube makes it weaker if you plan to us the light for impacts.

I had a bust a cap on my 6C but recently took it off. I think may be better on smaller lights as I doubt I will have a big flashlight in a situation where I would need it. I'm no longer involved in any SAR type activities.
Yes, making it weaker is a concern I have.

Breaking out a house window during a fire or in tornado wreckage was kind of what I had in mind for the bust a cap and strike bezel.
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
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Raleigh, NC
Just ordered the Maglite ml300l 4D. At the same time I sent an email to mag customer service. I asked what was the maximum voltage the 4D could handle. They replied 12 volts is the maximum. So, that leaves us many battery configurations to work with.

I also inquired about the ml-50l 2 C cell voltage. They responded that the maximum voltage is 3.6 volts. This doesn't make sense to me because their own power bank adapter uses one 18650 lithium ion battery in an adapter to power the two cell lights. And we all know that an 18650 will charge up to 4.2 volts. I have ordered the power bank adapter and will measure the output voltage after it is fully charged.
 

aznsx

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They responded that the maximum voltage is 3.6 volts.
I would bet, at least a small amount, that they are using a reference which is not uncommon in the industry, although one which doesn't spell everything out regarding the reality of things.

They're likely using what I would call the popular 'nominal' output reference / rating for most of the Li-ion chemistries most of us use. That is most often stated by many as: 3.6V or 3.7V, which is considered the 'nominal' ratings. This doesn't account for the fact that following a standard CV / final charge voltage of 4.20V, the output of those cells is indeed above 3.6/3.7V for a fair bit of their initial discharge.

Whenever I refer to this output, I generally list '3.6 - 4.2V', just to eliminate such ambiguity.

Keep in mind that (I believe) the Mag product you reference may be their very first foray into the world of Li-ion cells, aside from perhaps LFP cells (whose 'nominal' output voltage rating is '3.2V'. If so, they may be very new to this.
 

xxo

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Came up with some new adapters for the 4D ML300 – the gray adapter is a 2X 21700 to 4C adapter and the yellow is a 2X 18650 to 4C. The black adapter converts the light from 4D to 4C to work with the 4C adapters.

wqPIs8W.jpg
 

xxo

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Both the yellow 18650 and gray 21700 adapters will work in a 4C incan or in any 4D Mag using the black 4C to 4D adapter.

The glass transition temperature is about 85 °C.
 

knucklegary

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I have very little knowledge of 3d printers and all of the materials used in the process.. I've seen abs and nylons used in vacuum molding, but never seen up close printers in action.
When you say "glass" are you talking about a fiberglass reinforced abs, or something else?

If need to adjust overall length for protected cells vs unprotected, can the brass screw be shortened, or is that end of sleeve solid material?

185f .. hot potatoes!
 

alpg88

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Apr 19, 2005
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85c is abs or petg filament, more than stable enough for this purpose, I think even pla would work just fine if the light is stock. I had a 3d printer designed and printed dozens of quick release headlamp holders, designed and printed a light for blf scratch made context.
1690189507825.png


1690189528159.png

 

alpg88

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Apr 19, 2005
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When you say "glass" are you talking about a fiberglass reinforced abs, or something else?
It is a fancy term for starting to get soft. PLA softens and deforms in a hot car. However if you bake it at certain temp it gets stronger, and more heat resistant, but it shrinks, differently in every dimension, and sometimes warps depending on a thickness of a part. almost impossible to control or predict the warpage and shrinkage.
ABS and PETG are more flexible and more heat resistant than PLA. nylon and polycarbonate, are even stronger, but it takes a special printer to handle that material, PC needs like ~300c nozzle temp and 100-130c bed temp with enclosure. most common printers can not get that hot. Printed abs is not nearly as strong as injected molded abs. PC is pretty strong when printed, strong enough to print a boat motor prop.
I printed mostly ABS. but i heavily modified my printer to do it successfully.
 

xxo

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Apr 30, 2015
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I have very little knowledge of 3d printers and all of the materials used in the process.. I've seen abs and nylons used in vacuum molding, but never seen up close printers in action.
When you say "glass" are you talking about a fiberglass reinforced abs, or something else?

If need to adjust overall length for protected cells vs unprotected, can the brass screw be shortened, or is that end of sleeve solid material?

185f .. hot potatoes!
The glass transition temperature is where the consistency of the material begins to change from a hard plastic to a hard rubber. As the temperature increases, the material becomes softer until it reaches the melting point at around 210°C, where it begins to change into a liquid.

The length of the brass screw is fixed in the print. For safety, only protected cells should be used in series and the adapters are sized for protected cells.
 
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