Maxabeam beam shots

Echo63

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I took my Gen3 Maxabeam out for some beamshot photos the other night.
I dont think I have posted proper beam shots from this light yet.

Somewhere between 1200m and 1300m to the tower (on "medium" as i couldn't remember how to change high from momentary to switched - as soon as I got home i remembered the manual is under the foam in the lid of the case)
bj8iheL.jpg


On high - you can see a shadowy figure (me) holding the switch over to high
ZnTfZRw.jpg


sitting on a tripod in a wooden block made to hold it (battery is sitting on the ground) on medium again.
oNgydXV.jpg
 
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sledhead

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Outstanding shots! Love the tripod solution. :thumbsup:

I'll have to figure something out like that for my Lemax SuperPower.
 

karlthev

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Sandy knows....he's just wary (as I am) about the Super head out of balance on the tripod pivot point.

Karl
 

XeRay

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Sandy knows....he's just wary (as I am) about the Super head out of balance on the tripod pivot point. Karl

Good point, I wondered about that too, just not very well balanced with that extra large head out front.
 

Echo63

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Outstanding shots! Love the tripod solution. :thumbsup:

I'll have to figure something out like that for my Lemax SuperPower.

If it has the tripod holes built in, you just need a decent tripod head, and splay the legs out as far as they can go (so the weight of the unit is inside the triangle between the tripod feet)

I have access to a Mill now, so I will likely be building a proper tripod mount plate, similar to the top of the battery, with multiple 1/4 and 3/8 holes.
 

NoNotAgain

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If it has the tripod holes built in, you just need a decent tripod head, and splay the legs out as far as they can go (so the weight of the unit is inside the triangle between the tripod feet)

I have access to a Mill now, so I will likely be building a proper tripod mount plate, similar to the top of the battery, with multiple 1/4 and 3/8 holes.

May I suggest purchasing an Arca Swiss compatible clamp and a quick release plate?

I use Arca Swiss clamps on my monopods and purchase the Chinese made plates to mount on long lenses.

The clamps can be found for under $10, a 6" plate with 2screws for $11, and a 4" long plate is under $9.
 

karlthev

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The concern is not with the stability of the tripod base rather the attachment point which leaves this very front-heavy light unbalanced. In other words, the attachment points are not at the apex of balance. There is significant downward tension at the attachment point. The cradling apparatus shown here for the Maxabeam would, in a modified design, provide for much more significant frontal support for the LEMAX Superpower.


Karl
 
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Matt@PeakBeam

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I have access to a Mill now, so I will likely be building a proper tripod mount plate, similar to the top of the battery, with multiple 1/4 and 3/8 holes.

Sounds like a fun project, but just wanted to point out that we make a mount plate pretty much identical to what you just described. The part# is MBA-3600.
 

Echo63

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May I suggest purchasing an Arca Swiss compatible clamp and a quick release plate?

I use Arca Swiss clamps on my monopods and purchase the Chinese made plates to mount on long lenses.

The clamps can be found for under $10, a 6" plate with 2screws for $11, and a 4" long plate is under $9.

I am slowly trying to move over to the A/S system, but have way too much Manfrotto RC2 gear still (and I am no longer taking pics for a living, so its not being used too much, and will likely take a while to finish the transition, assuming I do finish the transition...
(the wooden mount in the pic is threaded onto an RC2 plate - its an old manfrotto head on a Slik 700 set of legs)


Sounds like a fun project, but just wanted to point out that we make a mount plate pretty much identical to what you just described. The part# is MBA-3600.
I am aware of the mount, and intended to acquire one (when I eventually get a return wire for my Gen2 and remote port for the Gen3) but Dad recently bought a Mill and I am looking for a project to use it on.
I have some other ideas too, building a mount on the rear (for pointing vertically, similar to an "L bracket" for a camera)
 

Matt@PeakBeam

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It is always nice to have an active project. Message me if you are interested in a dimensional drawing for our mount plate to have as a reference.

We've never made an L-bracket, but we did actually make a pair of right-angled Maxa Beams for a customer that had extreme front to back dimensional constraints but was dead set on using the Maxa Beam. That was an interesting project.
 

Matt@PeakBeam

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Matt, is that the same plate that's provided for the MBS-430/450?

This plate would be compatible with any 410/450 light and any 430 series lights except weapons lights (picatinny rail-mounted) and watertight enclosure lights (larger with detachable mounting bracket). It utilizes the "feet" on the bottom of the searchlight and the spring loaded pin (trigger) on 410/450 lights or the adjustable knob on 430 lights to lock it in place.
 

Echo63

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It is always nice to have an active project. Message me if you are interested in a dimensional drawing for our mount plate to have as a reference.

We've never made an L-bracket, but we did actually make a pair of right-angled Maxa Beams for a customer that had extreme front to back dimensional constraints but was dead set on using the Maxa Beam. That was an interesting project.

I would love to see pics of the right angled maxabeam if you have them.
and I am about to PM you - It would be great to get a copy of the dimensional drawing.
 

karlthev

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Echo63, can you give us some idea of what camera equipment and settings you used for these great shots? As others have already indicated, great pictures...how did you get the beam so blue-appearing...and the contrast so sharp??!!



Karl
 

Echo63

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Echo63, can you give us some idea of what camera equipment and settings you used for these great shots? As others have already indicated, great pictures...how did you get the beam so blue-appearing...and the contrast so sharp??!!



Karl
No worries, I used to be a professional photographer, so this stuff comes naturally to me, and I love helping others improve their photography.


they were taken after sunset, but before the sky was fully black with a Leica M240 in manual mode.
exposure settings are 4 seconds at f4, 400 ISO.
I cannot remember which lens was used, I think it may have been a voigtlander 35mm.
both the camera and light were locked down on a tripod, and a cable release was used to trip the shutter to avoid moving the camera.
almost any camera that is capable of being held on a tripod, and can be forced to shoot with manual settings is capable of good beam shots - although you may struggle with focusing
(take another light, shine it on the light you are photographing, focus, recompose and then switch to manual focus - it should lock the focus in the correct spot - you will need to refocus if you zoom though)

Low ISO, tripod and longer exposure are the vital bits for good beam shots - from there just shoot, look at the result and adjust the camera till it looks right on the screen, then shoot a slightly longer and shorter exposure too (bracket to increase the chances of getting it right)

the maxabeam is "daylight" coloured - so it naturally looks blue when thrown into a mixed light environment, along with the greenish colour of the streetlamps.
Pics were tweaked a little in lightroom

pic on the left is the posted one, right is straight out of camera
r3hbPkO.png


Pic on the left is straight out of camera (on medium) and right is the one I posted (on high, with me holding the switch for high)
BhsY0I1.png
 
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