omg bridge collapse.

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Buff

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Heck y'all making me look smert? I may be a goal dern jeneyus!
Seriously though even if the ferries just ferried the hazmat that would help if indeed that much hazmat runs that way each day.
 

aznsx

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Root cause analysis of this incident will be ongoing for quite some time. Barring some smoking gun, it willl not be done in a few days.

As I recall, that bridge / road is a toll facility, so it takes / has taken in quite a bit of money. Hopefully some of that money will help cover the cost of replacing the damaged section(??).
 
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Graylock

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It was an all Indian crew and the company that ran the ship, Synergy Group, brags about their diversity, inclusion, and belonging;https://www.synergymarinegroup.com/about/diversity-and-inclusion/
I'm not sure what your point is, but this has nothing to do with DEIB programs. Singapore is a very small country, and so must import massive numbers of foreign workers (well over 1 million in a country with around 4 million citizens) to make their economy function. Many come from India.

https://www.mom.gov.sg/documents-and-publications/foreign-workforce-numbers
 

TIFisher

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I'm not sure what your point is, but this has nothing to do with DEIB programs. Singapore is a very small country, and so must import massive numbers of foreign workers (well over 1 million in a country with around 4 million citizens) to make their economy function. Many come from India.

https://www.mom.gov.sg/documents-and-publications/foreign-workforce-numbers
His point is BS social quotas now trump better qualified personnel from being hired and assigned to operationally critical positions. It's a disgusting and moronic trend that's taken over the global job market, and this is yet another example that has had the unfortunate impact of costing lives. Singapore doesn't get a pass for a low talent pool. If this company couldn't staff its ship with competent assets, they shouldn't be in the shipping business, and certainly shouldn't have been allowed to navigate intranational waterways without a designated marine pilot.
 

vincent3685

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I'm not sure what your point is, but this has nothing to do with DEIB programs. Singapore is a very small country, and so must import massive numbers of foreign workers (well over 1 million in a country with around 4 million citizens) to make their economy function. Many come from India.

https://www.mom.gov.sg/documents-and-publications/foreign-workforce-numbers
The Dali was manned by an exclusively Indian crew. It was also the second accident it was involved in. Here it is in 2016 when it collided with a pier in Belgium;

My point is, Instead of hiring cheap, diverse labor, maybe increase your hiring standards and hire more qualified people.
 
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TPA

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It was an all Indian crew and the company that ran the ship, Synergy Group, brags about their diversity, inclusion, and belonging
In the merchant marine business, an all Indian crew wouldn't be abnormal, nor would that be the cheapest labor.

Filipinos are probably the largest group of seafarers, and are some of the absolute best, and can be some of the most expensive labour in the trade. I'd hire anyone who made it through the Philippine Merchant Marine Academy (PMMA) on-the-spot. India would rank in the top 5 by percentage of workers involved in the seafarer trade.
 

Graylock

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His point is BS social quotas now trump better qualified personnel from being hired and assigned to operationally critical positions. It's a disgusting and moronic trend that's taken over the global job market, and this is yet another example that has had the unfortunate impact of costing lives. Singapore doesn't get a pass for a low talent pool. If this company couldn't staff its ship with competent assets, they shouldn't be in the shipping business, and certainly shouldn't have been allowed to navigate intranational waterways without a designated marine pilot.

The Dali was manned by an exclusively Indian crew. It was also the second accident it was involved in. Here it is in 2016 when it collided with a pier in Belgium;

My point is, Instead of hiring cheap, diverse labor, maybe increase your hiring standards and hire more qualified people.


Quite the presumptions there. Crew and/or pilot error is definitely a possibility, as was apparently the case in 2016. Another possibility is that the ship was poorly maintained...an inspection last year flagged "deficiencies" in the propulsion and auxiliary systems--it is not clear at this time whether these were addressed, though a followup USCG inspection 3 months later noted no deficiencies. Yet another possibility is that a critical piece of hardware failed at the worst possible time due to a manufacturing defect. We just don't know.

BTW, the Dali, which was built in 2015, was under Greek ownership at the time of the 2016 accident, and was sold to the Singaporeans later that year.

I think it is best to wait for the results of the investigation before we assign blame for this fiasco.
 

Buff

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Patiently waiting for the results of an investigation goes against human nature. Our speculation and criticism makes for a good exercise in the investigation of our minds making this thread possible.
In the end there will be gloating for those that were right and hopefully apologies if any opposing opinions were hurtful in some way. I don't see either happening here as everyone is civilized here.
You know what i mean.
 
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Quite the presumptions there. Crew and/or pilot error is definitely a possibility, as was apparently the case in 2016. Another possibility is that the ship was poorly maintained...an inspection last year flagged "deficiencies" in the propulsion and auxiliary systems--it is not clear at this time whether these were addressed, though a followup USCG inspection 3 months later noted no deficiencies. Yet another possibility is that a critical piece of hardware failed at the worst possible time due to a manufacturing defect. We just don't know.

BTW, the Dali, which was built in 2015, was under Greek ownership at the time of the 2016 accident, and was sold to the Singaporeans later that year.

I think it is best to wait for the results of the investigation before we assign blame for this fiasco.
Still, when a company celebrates diversity hiring practices rather than hiring the best possible people for the job, including maintenance ... well, people start to notice when other people are killed.

 

vincent3685

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Quite the presumptions there. Crew and/or pilot error is definitely a possibility, as was apparently the case in 2016. Another possibility is that the ship was poorly maintained...an inspection last year flagged "deficiencies" in the propulsion and auxiliary systems--it is not clear at this time whether these were addressed, though a followup USCG inspection 3 months later noted no deficiencies. Yet another possibility is that a critical piece of hardware failed at the worst possible time due to a manufacturing defect. We just don't know.

BTW, the Dali, which was built in 2015, was under Greek ownership at the time of the 2016 accident, and was sold to the Singaporeans later that year.

I think it is best to wait for the results of the investigation before we assign blame for this fiasco.
And eight years later, we're still waiting for the full results of the 2016 investigation. Although it was initially blamed on operator error. Not to worry, I'm sure the totally competent, sober, and fully qualified mayor of Baltimore will leave no stone unturned getting to the bottom of what caused this tragedy. "We will build back safely and in the right way", i.o.w., with a big money grab for my people and supporters , ; https://www.thedailybeast.com/baltimore-mayor-turns-tables-on-racist-bridge-conspiracy-theorists
 
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vincent3685

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In the merchant marine business, an all Indian crew wouldn't be abnormal, nor would that be the cheapest labor.

Filipinos are probably the largest group of seafarers, and are some of the absolute best, and can be some of the most expensive labour in the trade. I'd hire anyone who made it through the Philippine Merchant Marine Academy (PMMA) on-the-spot. India would rank in the top 5 by percentage of workers involved in the seafarer trade.
Not sure what Filipinos have to do with anything, but yes, the Indians are great at dismantling ships. Home to the world's largest ship wrecking yard; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alang_Ship_Breaking_Yard 😆

BTW, I didn't say cheap-est labor. I said cheap labor. However, given the proximity of India to Singapore, it probably is the cheapest in the region.
 
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vincent3685

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Don't worry that bridge will be up a running in 10 years and at 10 times the actual cost.
After "mayor" scott insists on having it rebuilt using only black-owned businesses, the new bridge will take at least twice as long to build, cost twice as much, and last half as long as hiring the most qualified and economical (non-union) contractors.
 
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ItnStln

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In the merchant marine business, an all Indian crew wouldn't be abnormal, nor would that be the cheapest labor.
Who would be the cheapest labor?
Filipinos are probably the largest group of seafarers, and are some of the absolute best, and can be some of the most expensive labour in the trade. I'd hire anyone who made it through the Philippine Merchant Marine Academy (PMMA) on-the-spot. India would rank in the top 5 by percentage of workers involved in the seafarer trade.
There's a surprising amount of Filipinos in the US Navy.
 

ItnStln

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His point is BS social quotas now trump better qualified personnel from being hired and assigned to operationally critical positions. It's a disgusting and moronic trend that's taken over the global job market, and this is yet another example that has had the unfortunate impact of costing lives. Singapore doesn't get a pass for a low talent pool. If this company couldn't staff its ship with competent assets, they shouldn't be in the shipping business, and certainly shouldn't have been allowed to navigate intranational waterways without a designated marine pilot.
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sajohnson

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- It made the hard turn when it suddenly dropped anchor trying to stop.
- The black smoke was them trying to use the diesel generator to power it back up.
- It was carrying 100,000 tons and was going 8 knots. No bridge pier (with dolphins) is going to hold up to that without tremendous damage.
- The river was/is wide. The channel the ship was in is not.
- The mayday call from the ship saved lives. Only a maintenace crew was on it when it collapsed.
- The bridge and piers were sound. The piers were not designed to withstand the impact of the 200 million pound vessel.

It was just one of those things that happens from time to time.

Here's a clear headed article about it.

The video
If you look between the beacon lights above the bridge on the bridge deck itself you can see the flashing lights of the workers trucks who were inside of their trucks on a chilly night on their lunch break when it happened.

Thanks for the York Dispatch article, it is very comprehensive and, as you said, clear headed.

It was/is a terrible tragedy for some; a huge expense; and at a minimum, a large inconvenience and disruption for hundreds of thousands of people.

Very sad, and a sobering reminder of how vulnerable much of our infrastructure is.
 
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