Theory - Why not doubled body for dual switch?

Marquis07

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I know there are several lights that have both a side switch and a tail switch. These either have a tail switch for power + side switch for mode, or use a proprietary battery of sorts.

Couldn't someone make a light with a thin body between the main body and cell? This could be anodized and be used as the second negative terminal to the front of the light. This would let you have 2 independent switches with full control from either one of them, and you could use standard cells. :grin2:

The negatives I see,

1. It might be challenging for the second body to make good contact with the head, this might require a spring.
2. The light would have to be a few mms wider to accompany the extra wall.


Alternatively, I'm sure an adaptor could be made for any 21700 lights that take proprietary cells. The adaptor would take 18650s instead.

Thoughts, suggestions, criticisms?
Mark
 

IMA SOL MAN

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I know there are several lights that have both a side switch and a tail switch. These either have a tail switch for power + side switch for mode, or use a proprietary battery of sorts.

Couldn't someone make a light with a thin body between the main body and cell? This could be anodized and be used as the second negative terminal to the front of the light. This would let you have 2 independent switches with full control from either one of them, and you could use standard cells. :grin2:

The negatives I see,

1. It might be challenging for the second body to make good contact with the head, this might require a spring.
2. The light would have to be a few mms wider to accompany the extra wall.


Alternatively, I'm sure an adaptor could be made for any 21700 lights that take proprietary cells. The adaptor would take 18650s instead.

Thoughts, suggestions, criticisms?
Mark
If you come up with an original idea, don't post it on here, draw it out, date and sign it, and get it patented. Then you can sell it or license it and make a fortune! Of course, a certain communist Asian nation doesn't recognize patents, so they will pirate your idea ASAP, so deal with a US company and get as much money as you can up front!
 

vicv

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This exists. lol. All lights with electronic tail switch lights have an inner, or "nested" tube. Most other companies have lights with dual switches that function in that way. Olight does it but they use proprietary cells instead of a nested tube
 

letschat7

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On patents, once I thought I had a good idea to improve an existing product. A friend that was in engineering researched patents for me found that somewhere in the Netherlands someone had made an even better version than I could think up and it was in production being sold.

Patents can seem like a good idea however they stop innovation. Instead of a company making profits because of a good idea and making to a high quality they can just sue the competition that can do it better and or cheaper. I'm not for patents or intellectual property at all.
 

Marquis07

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@IMA SOL MAN
I contemplated a patent, but I don't think it's worth it. I like free money, but I have no way to turn the idea into anything. Someone else would have to do that.

Although... If someone did do something with the idea, I wouldn't mind getting a free sample. :)

I suspect someone might make a custom adapter for brands that have proprietary like olight, but that won't be me.


@vicv
Oh, right! I just checked on my TS10. Which lights are you thinking of with independent switches?

In this case, why do people use proprietary? I thought it was a necessary evil for independant switches, but I guess not.


Mark
 

vicv

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@IMA SOL MAN
I contemplated a patent, but I don't think it's worth it. I like free money, but I have no way to turn the idea into anything. Someone else would have to do that.

Although... If someone did do something with the idea, I wouldn't mind getting a free sample. :)

I suspect someone might make a custom adapter for brands that have proprietary like olight, but that won't be me.


@vicv
Oh, right! I just checked on my TS10. Which lights are you thinking of with independent switches?

In this case, why do people use proprietary? I thought it was a necessary evil for independant switches, but I guess not.


Mark
A lot of olights have dual switches. So do streamlights.
Why do they use proprietary cells? So they don't need to have a nested tube. Makes a light either thinner or able to use thicker metal. No fitting the pieces together. I'm sure other reasons. Also using proprietary cells guarantees your customer is using a cell that will allow the light to perform as intended. Guaranteed protection circuits. Guaranteed reverse polarity protection. Guaranteed runtime. a lot of people may not like proprietary cells, but there are good reasons for the practice besides just being evil and wanting to make the most amount of money possible
 

Marquis07

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A lot of olights have dual switches. So do streamlights.
Why do they use proprietary cells? So they don't need to have a nested tube. Makes a light either thinner or able to use thicker metal. No fitting the pieces together. I'm sure other reasons. Also using proprietary cells guarantees your customer is using a cell that will allow the light to perform as intended. Guaranteed protection circuits. Guaranteed reverse polarity protection. Guaranteed runtime. a lot of people may not like proprietary cells, but there are good reasons for the practice besides just being evil and wanting to make the most amount of money possible
Those are all solid reasons, thank you.


Mark
 

letschat7

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Why do they use proprietary cells? So they don't need to have a nested tube. Makes a light either thinner or able to use thicker metal. No fitting the pieces together. I'm sure other reasons. Also using proprietary cells guarantees your customer is using a cell that will allow the light to perform as intended. Guaranteed protection circuits. Guaranteed reverse polarity protection. Guaranteed runtime. a lot of people may not like proprietary cells, but there are good reasons for the practice besides just being evil and wanting to make the most amount of money possible
I read this yesterday but couldn't type out such a long response at work.

I was against proprietary cells until I read this. The fear is real that in the future I may not have access to a working battery but I'm now ok with using them. It is pricy when Pila take one cell or so, Led Lenser takes another, Securiled has a different one, Unilite has another, etc., etc.
 

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