EMP or CME vs Flashlights

Arkman

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Recently I had a lightning strike so close to my home that I lost a router, garage door opener and the WIFI on three computers. This strike never entered the home electrical. Two of the computers were off and not even plugged in. I discovered that two of my LED flashlights were also blown. One was a Nebo and the other an newer Streamlight weapon light.
My concern here is that all if the IC's in these flashlights will be toast if we have a significant EMP event.
I was instructed to only run Battery-Switch-Bulb lights on a firearm a long time back by some very knowledgeable folks.

What do you all think about this concern?
 

hamhanded

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An EMP or CME can kill LED flashlights.

Dropping, experiencing recoil, or the inrush current from turning on a worn bulb can kill incandescent flashlights.

Which scenario is more likely in general? What about on a weapon light?

I still have incandescent lights. It's good to have a backup. But I certainly wouldn't prefer them for any serious use.
 

letschat7

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Could you have a light with hardened electronics that uses that plastic that allows light to travel through it and can be bent in order to transmit light? This would have to be 50 or less lumens as to not overheat and use a nonrechargable battery so that you can replace cells in the event of an emp.

The British Army had some sort of secret light used by SBS/SAS that was probably radioactive like tritium weapon sites. Maybe that would be useful.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Recently I had a lightning strike so close to my home that I lost a router, garage door opener and the WIFI on three computers. This strike never entered the home electrical. Two of the computers were off and not even plugged in. I discovered that two of my LED flashlights were also blown. One was a Nebo and the other an newer Streamlight weapon light.
My concern here is that all if the IC's in these flashlights will be toast if we have a significant EMP event.
I was instructed to only run Battery-Switch-Bulb lights on a firearm a long time back by some very knowledgeable folks.

What do you all think about this concern?
The computers that were off and not plugged in, did they have anything plugged into them, such as the internet, phone line, etc.? I'm wondering if they truly were affected by induced current, or the current came in on some other wire.
 

aznsx

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Phoenix, AZ USA
Recently I had a lightning strike so close to my home that I lost a router, garage door opener and the WIFI on three computers. This strike never entered the home electrical. Two of the computers were off and not even plugged in. I discovered that two of my LED flashlights were also blown. One was a Nebo and the other an newer Streamlight weapon light.
My concern here is that all if the IC's in these flashlights will be toast if we have a significant EMP event.
I was instructed to only run Battery-Switch-Bulb lights on a firearm a long time back by some very knowledgeable folks.

What do you all think about this concern?

THIS is nothing short of bizarre. I've never heard of anything similar, and I've seen some strange lightning occurrences in the electrical realm. Thanks for posting this (I think).

I don't know the answer to your question, but sadly, you may have already answered it - I don't know.

Is your dwelling up to 'code', and does it use a single-point ground for everything entering it (electrical/phone/cable coax, etc)? Just curious.
 

Arkman

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To answer a few questions the computers were not on or connected to anything, literally on the book shelf and one in a laptop bag. Only the WIFI was damaged on each unit. As far as grounding, yes, I am a licensed amateur radio operator. ( I love grounding and TVSS). None of my ham gear was affected. I have mission darkness bags for comms and do have Faraday protection for gear that is mission specific. I just never guessed that flashlights could be damaged like that. The Nebo light was magnetically attached to a steel shelf, I guess that may have picked up some of the burst. I know that EMP and CME is a complex topic with many variables. For my money I am going to duplicate several of my go to lights. They will live in a bag. I have always saved the Surfire bulbs when I have upgraded lights so I could return to that option if needed.
 

bykfixer

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Sounds like Mother Nature was trying to tell you something Arkman. And it sounds like you heard her loud and clear.

Most homes are not even close to being protected for a lightning strike. If it hits close enough to an object that can conduct the massive amount of electricity driven by a massive amount of amps it could easily wreak havoc inside a home. But it's more likely you'll win the powerball lottery, even if you don't play the lottery than to have a bolt of lightning get inside the home. I had a tv get zapped one year because I hadn't unplugged it from the cable tv line. The bolt hit somewhere not near my home and some of the static electricity travelled along the cable line and took out several tv's along the way.

When I was growing up my parents would not allow us to take a shower/bath or talk on the (corded) phone during a lightning storm.....just in case. Evidently at some point Aunt So n So got zapped and killed.

Regarding LED flashlights and EMP's, it has been discussed here many times how an LED light probably won't survive an EMP attack.
 
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rgcurrey

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You can make a faraday cage from an ammo can . . . youtube is full of videos showing how. Fridge wont work due to seal would let in the damaging electricity.
 

aznsx

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I'm going to repeat my earlier reference to this phrase (which was in the form of a question [which wasn't exactly answered]), simply because of its great importance and need for emphasis. Properly done 'single point grounding' is critical where lightning is involved. Without it, nearby strikes can induce a huge difference of potential between non-common grounds, and thus things connected to those grounds, and that difference of potential can wreak hovoc inside.

I believe this was a residential 'code' requirement since the early 70s, but that doesn't mean it was always followed, or that it was done correctly or is still in good order. If your structure pre-dates that, it's more likely that it wasn't done correctly in the first place. Failure to ensure this is done correctly and in good order can cause great grief, and I've personally seen that happen. This isn't some 'black magic' or mystery, it's physics. Don't take my word for it; g-search it - read about it. It's fairly well-documented out there. Although I have read such info from multiple sources, I can't provide offhand reference to chapter and verse in 'the code', but if you look around, you'll find it's pretty well-documented out there from many sources. When I researched these matters I had a bunch of info sources 'bookmarked', but unfortunately don't know where i stored those offhand, as that was many years ago now.

EDIT: I know zero regarding other forms / sources of "EMP" - only lightning.
 
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IMA SOL MAN

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I'm going to repeat my earlier reference to this phrase (which was in the form of a question [which wasn't exactly answered]), simply because of its great importance and need for emphasis. Properly done 'single point grounding' is critical where lightning is involved. Without it, nearby strikes can induce a huge difference of potential between non-common grounds, and thus things connected to those grounds, and that difference of potential can wreak hovoc inside.

I believe this was a residential 'code' requirement since the early 70s, but that doesn't mean it was always followed, or that it was done correctly or is still in good order. If your structure pre-dates that, it's more likely that it wasn't done correctly in the first place. Failure to ensure this is done correctly and in good order can cause great grief, and I've personally seen that happen. This isn't some 'black magic' or mystery, it's physics. Don't take my word for it; g-search it - read about it. It's fairly well-documented out there. Although I have read such info from multiple sources, I can't provide offhand reference to chapter and verse in 'the code', but if you look around, you'll find it's pretty well-documented out there from many sources. When I researched these matters I had a bunch of info sources 'bookmarked', but unfortunately don't know where i stored those offhand, as that was many years ago now.

EDIT: I know zero regarding other forms / sources of "EMP" - only lightning.
Hmmm. I have a problem. My electric ground is on the back of the house, and my fiber optic box is on the front of the house, and when they installed the fiber optic box, the crew drove a ground rod into the ground there, and grounded the fiber optic there in front--not tied to the rest of the house ground. Sounds like this could be a major problem. Yes?
 

bykfixer

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If it isn't a #4 bar (1/4") of solid copper driven minimum 10' (and has 25 ohms or less resistance) it may not withstand a lightning strike. The utility companies usually use a pencil road at 2' or less deep. Eh's that's better than nothing but not much.

Traffic signals, bridges, radio antenna's and such use a series of #4 bars usually driven 30 feet or more to obtain that 25 or less ohm resistance. I've seen them driven as much as 110 feet before getting a good ohm reading.

They use 10 foot sticks and drive it to near ground level. If more is needed the next 10 foot stick is added via weld and driven. Every so often they hit what's called absolute refusal where you time it in minutes vs inches. An inch per minute, keep driving. An inch (or less) per 5 minutes, yeah close enough.
 
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