I think I’m out of getting new lights for a while

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,514
yea all think me buying some small land will be smart like 1/4 acre? localy just for a place to have to go .if the world gets crazier?i see small lots for like 7 grand ..id get a small loan .seems like land is smart to buy?
 

Monocrom

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yea all think me buying some small land will be smart like 1/4 acre? localy just for a place to have to go .if the world gets crazier?i see small lots for like 7 grand ..id get a small loan .seems like land is smart to buy?
$7,000 for 1/4 of an acre in America?? Where?
Sounds too good to be true.
Be sure you can build on it.
And that it's not 1/4 of some worthless swamp land.
 

Monocrom

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Looks like it'll be a lot of work clearing it out.
Again, check with the city if you are allowed to build on the property or if certain structures are not allowed. As much as I like the concept of a Tiny House, if it's designed properly, a staggering number of jurisdictions won't allow them! Same thing for trailers. (The type you find at a trailer park.) Be sure to check. And would also be a good idea to hire a surveyor to properly check the property on your behalf.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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My dream is it to be big enough and with enough trees I can camp there. I figure free camping and a place to go always I'd love no street lights for star gazing
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Be sure you have a good water source, as well as sewage system of a dependable sort. No, I don't mean an outhouse, although the ability to legally have one for a backup would be a good idea. If you have to put in a septic tank, you will have to have enough land for a drainage system, and the soil needs to be tested to see if it is suitable for a septic system drainage. If the water or sewer is a no-go, then don't buy. Also, check the taxes, can you have livestock, can you have a small business, etc. Lots of things to check on when you consider unimproved land.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Messages
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the one for 25k has all that and is right near sheriffs office but no trees it has sewer. but i doubt i can get a 25k loan . hect i dont even know how to apply for a loan lol...
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Btw it's ironic I'm asking about buying land in a thread where I'm trying to save money . My thinking is land is safer than money in the bank? I mean land will always be worth something people need places to live
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Btw it's ironic I'm asking about buying land in a thread where I'm trying to save money . My thinking is land is safer than money in the bank? I mean land will always be worth something people need places to live
The problem with land is, with real property taxes, if it doesn't make money, it's just a money pit, and unless you can flip it for a quick profit, you will lose money on it every year.
 

Guitar Guy

Enlightened
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Oct 23, 2016
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West Virginia
"Great lot on a very gentle slope at the end of the street. Private and no restrictions other than you cannot live full time in a camper or RV. Mobile homes, tiny homes and site built are allowed. You would need a septic tank, light pole and water meter installed."

Gotta watch those "gentle slopes", but almost a half acre for $6500. Not bad. Land is usually a good investment, if there isn't some issue. All of those things mentioned above by others do need to be checked out closely. A septic system is approx $10000, and the land has to pass a percolation test. Around here, you have to have at least a half acre to have enough room for the leach field, so check on that for any 1/4 acre lots.

The ad says no restrictions. You can look up the deed in the courthouse for free to double check that. You would want a lawyer to do a real title search to make sure you don't buy someone else's liens. That's probably 2 to 3 hundred.

The utility pole and lines to the structure will not be cheap. Water lines & digging for them - not cheap. There's 43560 sq. ft. in an acre, so .46 of that is just a few feet over 20000 sq ft. That equates to a 100 x 200 lot, or 160 x 134, or 75 x 266 ft. That gives you some distances to think about for water, electric, and / or gas lines.

Figure in some $$ for a roadway in to build and park, or you'll have a mud pit. Land can be cheap. Preparation, not necessarily. The taxes shouldn't be much, unless you're in a high class area.

Before you think too much about it, you can get pre-qualified for a loan for free at most lending institutions. They will base it largely off of your credit score and your debt to income ratio. You can learn a lot from finding a good local Realtor. It won't cost you anything because the seller pays the commission on the sale. I recommend a Century 21 agent, because that's who I'm affiliated with ;).
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Find out who the realtor/broker is working for, you the buyer, or the seller. Generally they work for the seller, and do not have your best interest as a priority at all. In that case, you want a lawyer that works for you, to handle the purchase, not a real estate agent--if it is legal in your state. In some states, a lawyer can handle the transaction, no broker/realtor required. Your state may be different.
 

Monocrom

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Many years back after a horrendous hurricane devastated an entire state, a reporter was sent out to interview people. He came upon a neo-hippie. Shorts, sandals, Hawaiian shirt, long hair, beard, but still on the young side. Sitting on a devastated porch. Cutting open a coconut with a machete. When asked about having lost everything, the neo-hippie said he didn't lose very much at all, and that he felt sorry for his landlord who lost the house and the rental house too. Neo-hippie mentioned he rented his apartment, didn't own land, didn't own a car, and had few possessions that kept him up all night to worry about losing.

Take from that true tale whatever you wish.
 

IMA SOL MAN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 18, 2023
Messages
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Location
The HEART of the USA.
Many years back after a horrendous hurricane devastated an entire state, a reporter was sent out to interview people. He came upon a neo-hippie. Shorts, sandals, Hawaiian shirt, long hair, beard, but still on the young side. Sitting on a devastated porch. Cutting open a coconut with a machete. When asked about having lost everything, the neo-hippie said he didn't lose very much at all, and that he felt sorry for his landlord who lost the house and the rental house too. Neo-hippie mentioned he rented his apartment, didn't own land, didn't own a car, and had few possessions that kept him up all night to worry about losing.

Take from that true tale whatever you wish.
Traveling light through life does have its advantages. You can own property, or it can own you.
 

Guitar Guy

Enlightened
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Oct 23, 2016
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590
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West Virginia
Find out who the realtor/broker is working for, you the buyer, or the seller. Generally they work for the seller, and do not have your best interest as a priority at all. In that case, you want a lawyer that works for you, to handle the purchase, not a real estate agent--if it is legal in your state. In some states, a lawyer can handle the transaction, no broker/realtor required. Your state may be different.
That lot is listed by a Realtor, so you have to deal with them in some form or another. The seller can't go around the Realtor once he signs the listing agreement.

Agency relationship laws have changed a lot in the last 25 years. In my state, one of the first things a Realtor does is show the customer an agency relationship agreement that discloses if the agent is working for the buyer, the seller, or both. If working as a dual agent, his/her duties & responsibilities change somewhat.

By contacting the listing agent, a buyer would expect the agent to have the seller's interest more in mind, but the upside is that the listing agent knows a lot more about the property / home than just a random agent who may be viewing the property for the first time also.

If the customer isn't comfortable with dual agency, he may pick his own buyer's agent if he knows one, or an agent from the listing agent's brokerage. It still doesn't cost the buyer anything, because the seller pays the commission, and the listing agent would split that with the second agent if the sale goes through. I view dual agency as working for the sale, not a person - helping both parties to have a smooth transaction and answering questions for them, without disclosing any personal information or limits of either.

I've acted as a dual agent many times and never had an issue or complaint, but then again, I consider myself one of the most ethical Realtors in our area. I have a business degree and have studied contract law & finance principles, and take what is often a person's largest expenditure of his/her life very seriously, and have never had a negative agent evaluation, ever. You may not get that same service if you call a "housewife agent" who is all smiles, high heels, lipstick, and perfume. I've seen some of those get companies into lawsuits. Trust me, don't go for the prettiest face, or the suits and ties. Go for the guy with the flashlight on his belt and a ladder in his truck.
 
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