Question for Robyn or other PEAK experts- O-ring safe thread Lube

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RAGE CAGE

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Question for Peak fans- O-ring safe thread Lube

Anyone happen to know what the recommended thread lube is for PEAK or what type of O ring they use? I currently am using plumbers silicone grease I picked up from Hdepot- I read somewhere where petroleum jelly or other types of lube may degrade O rings depending on what type of rubber they are made of.
 
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saabgoblin

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Curt recommended Locktite C5-A Copper Based anti seize paste at least for the brass flashlights and I am pretty sure that it would be fine for Aluminum as well, I use it on all of my lights so far. You might want to do a search on this topic as well because this question has been posed a number of times and you may get more educated answers than I can give.

I studied the composition of most of the O-Rings offered on McMaster-Carr and most of today's materials seem to be quite resistant to petroleum products. I have found that silicone based sprays are too slippery, providing no resistance allowing my twisties to turn on accidentially and once applied, it is difficult to remove.

Don't just go by Locktite itself, because if you do and you get the red(65?)version, you will be kissing your light goodbye because that is a threadlocker that requires something like 280ftlbs of pressure to remove in addition to over 400degrees to loosen the adhesive. :ohgeez:
 
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saabgoblin

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standard silicone lube is plenty good
Greenie, you know better than to post right after me especially in the Peak Forum, I am watching you!:scowl:

Rage Cage, he is probably right, in fact I am quite sure that he is so please excuse my personal jovial stab at GreenLed and a lot of people use Nyogel, a silicone based lubricant, no personal experience as of yet.
 

deusexaethera

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standard silicone lube is plenty good
No it isn't. Silicone isn't recommended for metal-on-metal contact. At least one of the two surfaces needs to be non-metallic.

I use lithium wheel bearing grease on all my flashlights, because it's relatively thin and relatively non-sticky, but it doesn't ever wear out either. Never once had a problem with it damaging anything, not even rubber O-rings.

In fact, this is a picture of the threads on my old Arc-AAA, after 8 years of near-daily use (and plenty of twisting it on/off for fun when I was bored):

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y186/deusexaethera/flashlights/CIMG3183.jpg

(excuse the fuzziness; the flash reflection off the threads was so bright the camera wouldn't focus properly. The threads are perfectly-polished.)
 
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monkeyboy

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Silicone grease is OK for flashlight use, it's just not recommended for high load bearings as it can cause them to wear quickly. This is not a problem with flashlights as there is very little pressure on the threads. All of the underwater diving light manufacturers recommend silicon grease as it does not damage o-rings and rubber parts.
 

deusexaethera

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Silicone grease is OK for flashlight use, it's just not recommended for high load bearings as it can cause them to wear quickly. This is not a problem with flashlights as there is very little pressure on the threads. All of the underwater diving light manufacturers recommend silicon grease as it does not damage o-rings and rubber parts.
If anyone jumped on my case about my post, that was going to be my response -- maybe the pressure isn't high enough for it to matter if the lubricant isn't really suitable.

The problem is that the threads do have fairly high pressure applied to them, especially in lights that have coil-spring terminals, and at least on certain patches of the threads before they are broken-in. The surface area of the threads is not that big, and they need to remain intact over thousands of cycles. Considering that the lithium grease I use starts to turn grey after just a few dozen cycles, I find it hard to believe that a lubricant not designed for metal-on-metal contact would be a good idea.

Maybe it doesn't matter so much for steel, which is really hard, or brass, which is self-lubricating, but I wouldn't use a non-metal lubricant on aluminum.
 

saabgoblin

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The locktite C5-A Copper Based Anti Seize was recommended/liked by Curt because it leaves a copper based film that binds to the threads but beware because it is pretty industrial stuff, I would recommend the small tube from Grainger and apply and spread with a Q-Tip or small brush. I have also used the C5 in larger amounts and frequent applications fo an older O-Ring that has seen better days. I want to get some Nyogel strictly for the O-Rings so that they seal well and cause less friction on the ring.
 

deusexaethera

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That copper-based grease would be good for titanium threads, but I don't think it makes much difference vs. lithium grease for steel, aluminum, or brass.
 

rider

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I found this thread because it looked like Peak supplied copper anti-seize as the thread lubricant on new lights (the only manufacturer I've purchased lights from that's used this substance), and I was trying to confirm it.

I'm about to try some nyogel or krytox on the O-ring, combined with the anti-seize on the threads, and see how it goes...

Anybody try this combo?
 

parnass

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I hope the Locktite copper anti seize compound is clear color. I used Permatex anti seize compound when mounting skid plates underneath my SUV. It was silver colored and a real mess.
 

rider

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No, it's definitely copper colored (typical copper anti-seize characteristics) - just like what you'd typically see marketed under the Loctite or Permatex name, but it's primarily applied beneath the level of the O-ring, so there's no issue with external contamination.
 
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