U.S. lithium production

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Galane

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I'd say it requires to entirely re-think the very essence of the city as it is. UAE tries to do that with their "wall" city. But you cannot destroy the existing cities at the same time.


They're actually building that thing? It's going to be the worst thing ever for any non-flying migratory wildlife in the area.
 
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......... We're all going to burn up in 9 years. 😱

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aznsx

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Want to expand a bit on why we need more lithium (etc.)? It ain't all about **** 'EVs' y'all, or even my flashlight cells (which are of course a very high priority). Some of it is about my air conditioning, I assure you. Increasingly the U.S. power grid / system(s) aren't just purely about generation, or DSM (Demand Side Management); also critical, especially, in the case of solar, is 'management' on the generation / production side to manage supply / demand issues. In this case, a lot of storage is required.

Just stumbled across this little 2 minute clip while streaming the local weather on my TV from a local TV station site (I'm not sure why, just a habit). It's a very light treatment for general consumption, not a deep dive into the subject, but you might find it interesting to note where a lot of 'lithium-based' cells are going in AZ, and it's not just to the state's
'EV' manufacturers by any means. There's a lot of 'em at this site, and now that they've been getting their act together on 'fail safe' system designs, etc. (following a significant failure or two in the past), this is in expansion mode again. You might find it 2 minutes of interesting pictures, if nothing else.

EDIT: I can't see the 'nuclear' line on the graph that's shown(?), but rest assured that the Palo Verde plant is supplying a lot of our power as well - and after having shut down several coal and other generation sites (probably prematurely - think 'cart before the horse'), I'm glad of it!

 
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IMA SOL MAN

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Want to expand a bit on why we need more lithium (etc.)? It ain't all about **** 'EVs' y'all, or even my flashlight cells (which are of course a very high priority). Some of it is about my air conditioning, I assure you. Increasingly the U.S. power grid / system(s) aren't just purely about generation, or DSM (Demand Side Management); also critical, especially, in the case of solar, is 'management' on the generation / production side to manage supply / demand issues. In this case, a lot of storage is required.

Just stumbled across this little 2 minute clip while streaming the local weather on my TV from a local TV station site (I'm not sure why, just a habit). It's a very light treatment for general consumption, not a deep dive into the subject, but you might find it interesting to note where a lot of 'lithium-based' cells are going in AZ, and it's not just to the state's
'EV' manufacturers by any means. There's a lot of 'em at this site, and now that they've been getting their act together on 'fail safe' system designs, etc. (following a significant failure or two in the past), this is in expansion mode again. You might find it 2 minutes of interesting pictures, if nothing else.

EDIT: I can't see the 'nuclear' line on the graph that's shown(?), but rest assured that the Palo Verde plant is supplying a lot of our power as well - and after having shut down several coal and other generation sites (probably prematurely - think 'cart before the horse'), I'm glad of it!

...and I thought Arizona was only good for dumping used razor blades...well, someone figured out how to make it productive. 👍
 

vadimax

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Want to expand a bit on why we need more lithium (etc.)? It ain't all about **** 'EVs' y'all, or even my flashlight cells (which are of course a very high priority). Some of it is about my air conditioning, I assure you. Increasingly the U.S. power grid / system(s) aren't just purely about generation, or DSM (Demand Side Management); also critical, especially, in the case of solar, is 'management' on the generation / production side to manage supply / demand issues. In this case, a lot of storage is required.

Just stumbled across this little 2 minute clip while streaming the local weather on my TV from a local TV station site (I'm not sure why, just a habit). It's a very light treatment for general consumption, not a deep dive into the subject, but you might find it interesting to note where a lot of 'lithium-based' cells are going in AZ, and it's not just to the state's
'EV' manufacturers by any means. There's a lot of 'em at this site, and now that they've been getting their act together on 'fail safe' system designs, etc. (following a significant failure or two in the past), this is in expansion mode again. You might find it 2 minutes of interesting pictures, if nothing else.

EDIT: I can't see the 'nuclear' line on the graph that's shown(?), but rest assured that the Palo Verde plant is supplying a lot of our power as well - and after having shut down several coal and other generation sites (probably prematurely - think 'cart before the horse'), I'm glad of it!

I'd like to ask one question: how much CO2 is in the Earth's atmosphere (percentage)? May you answer this question without googling it?

There was a hearing in the Senate exactly on this question. And it looked pathetic.

There is nothing more imbecilic in the Universe than "solving" nonexistent "problems".
 

orbital

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Friend of mine was skeptical on the climate change discussion.
We were sitting on his deck talking about it and I said 'we are between glaciations' __ that's all he needed to hear to thoroughly believe it wasn't an issue.
Then I went into the rate of change in our atmosphere in the last 150 years. That's a measurable thing.

..The whole idea of co2 scrubbers and some wildly complex systems to remove it from the atmosphere is beyond ridiculous, when we have trees do it for free.


But, there's not alot of money to be made replanting forests
 

vadimax

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OK, the facts: current CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere is… 0.04%. If it becomes 0.02% everything green on this planet will die because of suffocation (plants and seaweed breathe with carbon dioxide).
 

idleprocess

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Just stumbled across this little 2 minute clip while streaming the local weather on my TV from a local TV station site (I'm not sure why, just a habit). It's a very light treatment for general consumption, not a deep dive into the subject, but you might find it interesting to note where a lot of 'lithium-based' cells are going in AZ, and it's not just to the state's 'EV' manufacturers by any means.
600-800MW-Hr storage is great for a demand- or transmission-constrained site such as the 32MW site they mention. That's more than a day's worth of production.

But that's more of a frequency-regulation scale installation in a state with a sum generating capacity of some ~27.5GW. Not sure the economics favor Li- based batteries - even cheaper/safer/longer-lasting LFP - for larger scale installations.

The whole idea of co2 scrubbers and some wildly complex systems to remove it from the atmosphere is beyond ridiculous, when we have trees do it for free.
The suggestion that mass active CO2 scrubbing is a solution to be pursued is absurd. The volume of air that would need to be physically handled to reduce a trace gas from the present ~410ppm to ~350ppm is - relative to any realistic ability to do so - impossibly vast.

And CO2 is far from the only GHG whose concentration needs to be reduced from the atmosphere.
 
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bykfixer

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It's my understanding that trees and other plants breathe in carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen and times but other times breath in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.

And I read in Readers Digest a long time ago about a town in Vermont where they planted a bunch of maple trees to "scrub" the air and as the trees got older the pollution got worse....because the species of maple tree was polluting the air too.

But it is a fact that the more trees in the concrete jungle the cooler the concrete jungle stays in summer.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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It's my understanding that trees and other plants breathe in carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen and times but other times breath in oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.

And I read in Readers Digest a long time ago about a town in Vermont where they planted a bunch of maple trees to "scrub" the air and as the trees got older the pollution got worse....because the species of maple tree was polluting the air too.

But it is a fact that the more trees in the concrete jungle the cooler the concrete jungle stays in summer.
Cue daydream sequence...I wonder if there are any trees planted on the top of Trump Tower...
 

Galane

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What's throwing things a little out of whack this year is the Hunga-Tonga volcano eruption. Unlike explosive (Strombolian) volcanic eruptions on land that spew particulates and various gasses like sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere and mostly have a cooling effect (and break up ozone), the Hunga-Tonga underwater blast threw mostly water up there. Initial estimates have turned out to be way too low. Enough to boost the water vapor content in the stratosphere 10% to 15%. Revised estimates go as high as a 30% increase in stratosphere water vapor.

What that's doing is causing an increase in stratospheric clouds which reflect more solar energy back to space, but the water vapor (which is the most powerful GHG) is holding more heat radiated back from the ground surface and troposphere/surface level atmosphere.

It may take up to 5 years before precipitation lowers stratosphere water vapor levels to normal.

Whether or not we humans do anything, eventually it will go back to normal. I expect there to be some wanting to do experiments in stratospheric cloud seeding to accelerate precipitation of the excess water vapor. How about over the American Southwest, the Sahara, around Mt. Kilimanjaro, Gobi Desert, and other places that are on the dry side?
 

bykfixer

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At $6/ pound pecan trees can bring in serious coin. I know a grower who makes enough $ each year to hire a security company to keep kleptos away. He said the rustlers have gotten pretty sophisticated.

He was teaching a bridge building class I attended and at one point went around the room asking students to tell about themselves in 100 words or less. I said "Ima flashaholic". He said "what's that?" I replied I collect flashlights." He said "see me after class I need a good flashlight". We talked after class about his situation. Next day I gave him a PKDL FL-2. He was a retired Marine combat vet and showed me self-defense tecniques he'd use it for.
 

orbital

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If anyone wants to literally see carbon gathered from trees every season,
come on over in about 10 weeks and gather the 19gizzilion leaves that fall onto my yard, dry them & see if they burn.

`Yep, really has nothing to do w/ lithium in the US
 
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turbodog

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... I expect there to be some wanting to do experiments in stratospheric cloud seeding to accelerate precipitation of the excess water vapor. How about over the American Southwest, the Sahara, around Mt. Kilimanjaro, Gobi Desert, and other places that are on the dry side?

That's great and all, but rainwater w/o topsoil doesn't do much good. IIRC it takes around 100 years to create/develop an INCH of topsoil and only one bad tilling/planting/land mgmt season to destroy it.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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That's great and all, but rainwater w/o topsoil doesn't do much good. IIRC it takes around 100 years to create/develop an INCH of topsoil and only one bad tilling/planting/land mgmt season to destroy it.
The American Dust Bowl of the 1930's is not over 100 years, and the farmland that the top soil blew off of has well recovered. In fact, I'm fairly certain that it was producing in less than 15 years or so afterward. I may be wrong about that, but my family farmed in SW Kansas during that time, and they had crops, so... I don't know, I haven't done any research on the subject, just what I remember my mother and grandmother talking about. My father's family farmed in SW Kansas, also, and survived the Dust Bowl. If it takes 100 years per inch, I don't know how we survived the "Dirty Thirties".
 
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