U.S. vs UK words/sayings

Jay R

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 10, 2006
Messages
1,656
Location
Bracknell, England.
If you want to try Cockney, don't make the rookie mistake of saying the rhyming word. "The trouble and strife is on the dog and bone" would get you laughed at or possibly beaten up where I grew up. "The trouble's on the dog."is all you would want to say.

(In the middle of this post the power went out in my street for 40 mins. Damn but my neighbours all have laughably weak torches. I showed them all up with my Skyray King)

Quite a lot of common phrases you hear in England have their origins in Cockney. Scarper (run away), Go for a Jimmey, Take a butchers at this, Don't tell porkies, That's a load of cobblers, She has a nice set of Bristols, He's doing bird, and many others. Most English people don't even realise it.
 
Last edited:

novice

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Messages
1,033
Does the occasional use of the British phrase, "a cunning plan..." come from the former BBC "Blackadder" t.v. series?
 

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
4,279
Location
WI
+

Is there some kind of master key for when to pronounce an A as an R,, because it doesn't always seem to apply.
Often very troubling for many

For example:: tennis player MariR SharapovR ~ :caution:
 

ElectronGuru

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 18, 2007
Messages
6,055
Location
Oregon
Out of pocket...

US: responsible to pay (from my pocket)

UK: not working for someone (not in their pocket)
 

inetdog

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 4, 2013
Messages
442
Out of pocket...

US: responsible to pay (from my pocket)

UK: not working for someone (not in their pocket)

Recently in US as synonymous with out of the office or out of contact.
Possibly influenced by the football situation of the quarterback being "out of the pocket".
 

eaglemax

Newly Enlightened
Joined
May 5, 2014
Messages
51
I have found on other forums not related to a torch that some US men do not see the British humour and think you are being rude or cheeky when in fact you are just using every day speech.
 

gravelmonkey

Enlightened
Joined
Aug 13, 2012
Messages
735
Location
UK
Knackered - Tired and/or worn out.

Ie. Knackered after a long day or "I need to change that tyre, it's knackered".
 

ven

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 17, 2013
Messages
22,533
Location
Manchester UK
Eaglemax that could be quite true,I try to adapt my figure of speech although it's pretty much as is (I pretty much type what I think) be it stupid or not :laughing:

But there is always a "lost in translation" even on uk forums with uk humor as it varies a lot anyway.
 

markr6

Flashaholic
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
9,258
Forgot about this thread but was reminded in another. So to keep from going OT I'm back here.

I watched a good amount of British and Australian shows on Netflix recently. I like how a lot of people start sentences with "Right...". Sounds more classy than our "OK..." or "So..."
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,440
Location
Dust in the Wind
I thought "boot" was the rear storage of a car called "trunk" in US, but why trunk when everybody knows and elephants trunk is up front?

The other day Ven referred to filling up his fuel tank to "the brim", which caused me to pause and think... "brim??, oh he means to "full". lol
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,335
Location
Pacific N.W.
Don't get me started on -


trunk

(trŭngk)n.1.a. The main woody axis of a tree.
b. Architecture The shaft of a column.

2.a. The body of a human or other vertebrate, excluding the head and limbs.
b. The thorax of an insect.

3. A proboscis, especially the long prehensile proboscis of an elephant.
4.a. A main body, apart from tributaries or appendages.
b. The main stem of a blood vessel or nerve apart from the branches.

5. A trunk line.
6. A chute or conduit.
7. Nauticala. A watertight shaft connecting two or more decks.
b. The housing for the centerboard of a vessel.

8. Nautical Any of certain structures projecting above part of a main deck, as:a. A covering over the hatches of a ship.
b. An expansion chamber on a tanker.
c. A cabin on a small boat.

9.a. A covered compartment for luggage and storage, generally at the rear of an automobile.
b. A large packing case or box that clasps shut, used as luggage or for storage.

10. trunks Shorts worn for swimming or other athletics.


Is it any wonder why English is such a terribly hard language to learn?

~ Chance


 

ven

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 17, 2013
Messages
22,533
Location
Manchester UK
I thought "boot" was the rear storage of a car called "trunk" in US, but why trunk when everybody knows and elephants trunk is up front?

The other day Ven referred to filling up his fuel tank to "the brim", which caused me to pause and think... "brim??, oh he means to "full". lol


Haha, yes brim/brimmed =full
Bonnet=hood
"Pop the bonnet mate"
 
Top