U.S. lithium production

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jtr1962

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It's engineers and designers that keep me awake at night. I have to spend most of my waking hours fixing their feaupau's and hours I'm supposed to be sleeping figuring out how to. But hey, what do I know with my barely able to read at 3rd grade level and all.
Nobody said engineers never make mistakes. In fact, engineering is an iterative process where you learn from your mistakes to improve the next version. Perfection doesn't exist in this world. The same can be said for medical science, education, literally anything else humans do.

You're hardly 3rd grade level with your writing and general ability to understand complex issues. This forum likely has a much higher average IQ level among its membership than the cohort referenced in Poppy's comment.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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You might want to read up on the broad powers granted to the government during times of emergency:


The US Constitution was never about giving people absolute freedom to do whatever they wanted regardless of the consequences to others. And all the emergency powers that exist were passed by Congress and other legislatures (i.e. We The People).


I get it. When engineers do your bidding for you, they're great. If they do anything else, they're "out of their lane". So I can't have any opinions on how things should be run, but non-engineers can?

"Intellectuals" designed this nation? Isn't that bad in your book? I thought you hate elites? Why would you want to follow a template designed by elites?

One prerequisite mentioned by the founding fathers for this nation to survive was an educated populace.


The state of education and general discourse lately is one thing keeping lots of people up at night worrying about the future of this country.
Linking to left-wing websites does not strengthen your argument.

The founders were well educated, men of means--elites of their day. They had a good understanding of the problems of different kinds of governments from studying history. Plus, they had just fought a war against the strongest military in the world, and won by the grace of GOD. They (especially G. Washington) had felt the sting of being looked upon by the monarchy as second class subjects (Colonials), and bristled at the arrogance of the elites of Britain. They had also fought alongside of commoners, and learned to respect some of them. Yes, many were trash, but hey, so were some of the British military--that's why they had officers, to keep the trashy enlisted men in order. I don't think the elites who founded this nation are much like the elites that run our world today. Our constitution, and our form of government was designed to preserve individual freedom, and prevent the kind of tyranny that we saw during the COVID-19 pandemic. Even now, the corrupted politicians and bureaucrats of the Deep State are working to take freedoms from U.S. citizens. I won't go any further on this, because this is getting too political, but if you have been paying attention to the real news, then you know what is going on.

Yes, an educated and well informed public is necessary to preserve this nation. Unfortunately, our media has been infiltrated with enemies of the nation, who are feeding the under-educated population propaganda.
 

Lips

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Sounds about right, especially if you were travelling along I-35E through downtown Dallas - a stretch of highway that Dallas PD finds difficult to patrol.

That was it! Didn't see a police vehicle anywhere.

Dropped down from airport south to I20 east to get around it. Amazing to watch motorcycles going thru traffic and tailgaters pushing the left lane with inches to spare on I20. 3 wrecks in short distance but lots of police there...

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8/18/23
Ford CEO Jim Farley admits electric F-150 Lightning will 'have to improve' after he waited 40 MINUTES to get the battery up to 40% in $50,000 truck
 

idleprocess

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Ford CEO Jim Farley admits electric F-150 Lightning will 'have to improve' after he waited 40 MINUTES to get the battery up to 40% in $50,000 truck
Here's the apparent source. 1%/minute from a "low-speed charger" is a step up from the many hours that it would take a L2 charger to do the job:
  • F-150 Lightning battery nominally 131kWH
  • 131kWH • 0.4 = 52kWH
  • 40 min / 60 min = 0.667 hr
  • 52 kWh / 0.667 hr = 78kW
Of course the ideal would have been 150kW which would have delivered 65% in ~41 minutes (scroll to "How fast can the F-150 Lightning charge?"). The F-150 Lightning is 400V architecture so the ~350kW charging available to 800V architectures isn't an option.

Why it was providing ~half the potential power could be any number of reasons. While there could have been a defect, most likely a lack of optimization between charger and vehicle - a common reality whenever you're not charging a Tesla at a Tesla Supercharger. The latter point is caused by a historic lack of cooperation between EV OEMs and charger manufacturers / operators, resulting in more cautious charging algorithms since technical data sharing seems to be sparse and validation generally involves volunteer vehicles as new models appear on the market.

But even moreso than smaller EVs, electric trucks aren't ideal for road-tripping due to their unavoidably greater energy consumption. Thus the target market of commuters slow-charging at home or at work.
 
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They're actually building that thing? It's going to be the worst thing ever for any non-flying migratory wildlife in the area.

My best prediction, based on over 60 years of living and reviewing millinia of history, is that nobody will live there long term, and less than 10% will ever be completed.
 

jtr1962

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My best prediction, based on over 60 years of living and reviewing millinia of history, is that nobody will live there long term, and less than 10% will ever be completed.
I kind of agree. Cities developed the way they currently exist for lots of reasons. I certainly like the idea of city designed to be walkable and bikeable, with no cars, but there are myriad better ways to accomplish that. The amount of steel/concrete needed per capita alone seems like a showstopper.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Someone said to me no one wants an EV. There is currently a 5 Billion Dollar battery plant that will employ 3500 people being built a few miles from me.
Yep, no shortage of profiteers out there. Eastern Kansas is also getting a battery plant. The politicians love these, because it brings cha-ching! and jobs (more cha-ching!) to the area. They think it will help them get votes at the election time.
 

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idleprocess

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I recently read there are four buyers waiting on every EV rolling off the assembly line. That surprised me. :unsure:
It's been a supply constrained segment for years now - when you can sell everything you make with no major incentives and dealers can mark up prices well beyond what ICE buyers will suffer without hurting their ability to move units, small wonder prices remain high.
 
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It's been a supply constrained segment for years now - when you can sell everything you make with no major incentives and dealers can mark up prices well beyond what ICE buyers will suffer without hurting their ability to move units, small wonder prices remain high.

Do you think the associated government mandates are also a big contributing factor to the prices remaining high?
 

Lips

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The CEO of Ford can't get his electric F150 above 40% on a fast charger for 40 minutes while the LEFT wing makes excuses; glad he didn't have to be at someplace at some specific time... California and Canada dumps tons of carbon into the air with constant wildfires all while banning everything under the sun; two beers for you but not two (6!) glasses of wine for me... Lets push more manufacturing to China and India, burning coal, and pretend the world made progress "overall". Lets go Brandon\Kerry... Put a solar panel on your roof and change out your tar/oil roof ten years early; ignore the leaks and service calls to keep the solar running... Kinda like the TV series LOST!
 

idleprocess

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Do you think the associated government mandates are also a big contributing factor to the prices remaining high?
Rebates perhaps so - that's a few grand of price overhead that the manufacturers and dealers alike are granted for free and has been a factor in pricing since introduction. Mandates are either dead (i.e. CA and NY from a decade ago that put minuscule numbers of compliance cars on the roads) or haven't kicked in - CA and WA are 2035 / 2030 and will be a phased implementation unlikely to hit their aspirational milestones.

The CEO of Ford can't get his electric F150 above 40% on a fast charger for 40 minutes
Talked about this in post 264. TL;DR there's a spotty record of cooperation regarding DC fast charging protocols and even had the charger / vehicle been working as expected, and full size EV trucks aren't optimal as highway cruisers w/ 150kW charging.
 

Lips

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Here's the apparent source. 1%/minute from a "low-speed charger" is a step up from the many hours that it would take a L2 charger to do the job:
  • F-150 Lightning battery nominally 131kWH
  • 131kWH • 0.4 = 52kWH
  • 40 min / 60 min = 0.667 hr
  • 52 kWh / 0.667 hr = 78kW
Of course the ideal would have been 150kW which would have delivered 65% in ~41 minutes (scroll to "How fast can the F-150 Lightning charge?"). The F-150 Lightning is 400V architecture so the ~350kW charging available to 800V architectures isn't an option.

Why it was providing ~half the potential power could be any number of reasons. While there could have been a defect, most likely a lack of optimization between charger and vehicle - a common reality whenever you're not charging a Tesla at a Tesla Supercharger. The latter point is caused by a historic lack of cooperation between EV OEMs and charger manufacturers / operators, resulting in more cautious charging algorithms since technical data sharing seems to be sparse and validation generally involves volunteer vehicles as new models appear on the market.

But even moreso than smaller EVs, electric trucks aren't ideal for road-tripping due to their unavoidably greater energy consumption. Thus the target market of commuters slow-charging at home or at work.

Talked about this in post 264. TL;DR there's a spotty record of cooperation regarding DC fast charging protocols and even had the charger / vehicle been working as expected, and full size EV trucks aren't optimal as highway cruisers w/ 150kW charging.




"If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, then you don't understand it yourself" Albert Einstein. (Whether he said the quote or not!)
 

idleprocess

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"If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, then you don't understand it yourself" Albert Einstein. (Whether he said the quote or not!)
If we're going to resort to trite phrases, I can explain it to you but I can't understand it for you.
 
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