What was your Good deed for the day?

Joined
Oct 21, 2011
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Seattle
DUDE! You really need to relocate away from Seattle!
Plenty of problems everywhere, my friend. More than enough for everyone, everywhere. There are a lot of people here I benefit from and even more who benefit from me. A lot of poor kids, elderly and special needs kids specifically. That's purpose. It's the most valuable commodity available beyond salvation.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
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Pacific N.W.
Plenty of problems everywhere, my friend. More than enough for everyone, everywhere. There are a lot of people here I benefit from and even more who benefit from me. A lot of poor kids, elderly and special needs kids specifically. That's purpose. It's the most valuable commodity available beyond salvation.
True that! 👆
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
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I gave away my old dslr I thought nothing off it I would never used it anymore I could have sold it maybe for 300 bucks. But I'm old and hate to deal with selling at etc etc so I gave it to a hotel clerk. Turns out she was saving for this camera.. her smile will always be in my memory .. I made someone happy. So worth it . I'm a flawed sob. But I still love to make others smile
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
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Dec 20, 2012
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Northern New Jersey
I gave away my old dslr I thought nothing off it I would never used it anymore I could have sold it maybe for 300 bucks. But I'm old and hate to deal with selling at etc etc so I gave it to a hotel clerk. Turns out she was saving for this camera.. her smile will always be in my memory .. I made someone happy. So worth it . I'm a flawed sob. But I still love to make others smile
That was very nice of you raggie.
I'm still holding onto my Fully manual 35mm Cannon AT-1. I don't know why, I'll certainly never use it again. Maybe because at one time it was so valuable to me?

I also have a Yashica Mat 124 that for years sat on display on the hutch in my bedroom. Hmmm, not any more. I guess I didn't unpack it the last time I moved.

Oh well, for giggles, I decided to google it. It's worth anywhere from $300 to $800. Wow! It's just sitting in a box in the attic. I hope that it still has collector's value when my day comes and the kids sell it. Or in the least give it away to someone who really appreciates it instead of throwing it in a dumpster.

LOL... I should save them the hassle, and trade it to someone who will appreciate it more than a limited number of dollars, now.
 

bykfixer

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John 3:16
I'll ring my bell once. When my pop was still alive and ill I'd drive him where ever he wanted to go. When we arrived at say, a restaraunt he'd say "park here" meaning a handicap parking spot. I'd say "no dad I'll drop you off at the door and go park somewhere". If it was a bad day for him I'd walk him into the place and find him a seat then go park his van. One day he asked why I won't park his van in a handicap parking spot.

I replied "because a vet or someone who is worse off than you might need it". After that he started saying "drop me off by the front door".
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,312
That was very nice of you raggie.
I'm still holding onto my Fully manual 35mm Cannon AT-1. I don't know why, I'll certainly never use it again. Maybe because at one time it was so valuable to me?

I also have a Yashica Mat 124 that for years sat on display on the hutch in my bedroom. Hmmm, not any more. I guess I didn't unpack it the last time I moved.

Oh well, for giggles, I decided to google it. It's worth anywhere from $300 to $800. Wow! It's just sitting in a box in the attic. I hope that it still has collector's value when my day comes and the kids sell it. Or in the least give it away to someone who really appreciates it instead of throwing it in a dumpster.

LOL... I should save them the hassle, and trade it to someone who will appreciate it more than a limited number of dollars, now.
I love photography I had an old Pentax k1000 had no auto features ..you had to even advance film your self. But I loved it .. btw I still think some one will make a device to make a slr into digital..I love photography landscapes and wildlife are my fav subjects
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,312
@bykfixer. After 8 years of passing it by I finally parked in the Purple Heart spot at the VA clinic.
I am 75 years old, 100% disabled and have two purple hearts. I will never do it again. I will find my way in there. So I understand what you are saying.
Thanx for you service Vietnam I assume? Dad was a Vietnam vet that agent orange messed him up ..
 

The Hawk

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
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Location
Kentucky
My goal is to do five good deeds per day. Some days I am unable to do that, but usually I get at least five. Even if it's just letting someone out in traffic or holding a door for the person behind me, I count them as good deeds.
 

Dave_H

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
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Location
Ottawa Ont. Canada
I think feeling good about doing good deeds is not necessarily a bad thing, unless accompanied by excessive self-interest. It is a small reward, and helps reinforce doing good things in future, and can encourage others to do similar (including practicalities).

This, coming from someone who does not "toot his own horn" much, but don't want to descend too deep into religious/philosophical aspects. That in itself can be a distraction.

Motives and benefits for doing good can be dissected to the n-th degree. Example:

Instead of using paper leaf bags, yesterday I put out 8 plastic garbage cans full for pickup.

Who benefits:

Me: (+) I save on paper bags, or new plastic garbage cans. It's good exercise, and helps me structure my day. Feeling good is overall beneficial to health.

Environment: (+) saving paper which saves trees, and re-using plastic saves that. Leaves go to
compost which is useful (even resold), not just a disposal.

Manufacturers/Retailers: (-) Not! I am not buying bags or cans.

So it's not always a simple matter.

Dave
 
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PewPewPew

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jul 26, 2023
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Location
Dothan, AL.
Jesus told his disciples to do good deeds in secret, for their rewards are in heaven. Whenever he did good he always told the person He helped "Tell no one." He said all the people who tell of their good deeds have already got it from mens respect and admiration.

I'm far from perfect, so when I find myself recapping my day to friends, including the good deeds, I realize that I've just got my reward already. It's hard because my ego/self image wants the props. For me, it's pretty difficult to keep those secret. I'm working on it though.

If this thread is about looking for good things that bring up our spirits, how about highlighting good deeds that someone else did, so we're not tooting our own horns?
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,312
Crazy world I go to Dothan all the time to go to big lots small world
 
Joined
Oct 21, 2011
Messages
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Location
Seattle
I'm definitely of the mind that right thing to do is the right thing to do, for sure. Doing the right thing has always been it's own reward.

However, with experience, I have found that the right thing to do can sometimes seem wrong or cruel and things get complicated. For example, giving a heroin addict cash isn't the right thing and that person will face suffering and agony because of it. In this case, their suffering and agony is the right thing. An ugly reality.

I find people to be largely petty. Letting them fail has been more often the correct choice lately. It's not fun to watch, but being there to help them up and see the lesson take root is very encouraging.
 

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
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Flushing, NY
However, with experience, I have found that the right thing to do can sometimes seem wrong or cruel and things get complicated. For example, giving a heroin addict cash isn't the right thing and that person will face suffering and agony because of it. In this case, their suffering and agony is the right thing. An ugly reality.
Do what my maternal grandfather used to do when drunks asked him for money for food or coffee. Offer to buy them a meal or coffee. He knew the ones who refused him simply wanted more money for booze.

Years ago, we had a guy on the next block who was a drug addict. He used to ask my mother for money from time to time. She usually refused, knowing what he would do with it. This person really squandered away his life. He inherited the house he was in free and clear, along with about $300K from his grandmother. This was in the 1980s. He was around my age. He easily could have been set for life, never needing to work another day, in his 20s. I thought what a great thing they would have been if I had been in his shoes, being free from the burden of having to earn money to survive. He spent every penny on drugs. He and his friends trashed the house, doubtless severely impacting the money he got when it was sold.

I don't know what became of him, but he's probably dead by now. One of my brother's friends, who also had a bad drug problem, died at 47. Most people who knew him were surprised he lived that long.

It's nice to think letting people fail is the right choice which helps them, but more often than not they just fail. There's no helping them up. I don't know what the right answer is. Honestly, even though I feel sorry for addicts and drunks, sometimes I think the best course is to just give them lots more of what they crave. They're bent on self-destruction anyway, let them just get it over with as soon as possible, without robbing people to pay for their habit.
 

Monocrom

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Joined
Aug 27, 2006
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NYC
Do what my maternal grandfather used to do when drunks asked him for money for food or coffee. Offer to buy them a meal or coffee. He knew the ones who refused him simply wanted more money for booze.

Years ago, we had a guy on the next block who was a drug addict. He used to ask my mother for money from time to time. She usually refused, knowing what he would do with it. This person really squandered away his life. He inherited the house he was in free and clear, along with about $300K from his grandmother. This was in the 1980s. He was around my age. He easily could have been set for life, never needing to work another day, in his 20s. I thought what a great thing they would have been if I had been in his shoes, being free from the burden of having to earn money to survive. He spent every penny on drugs. He and his friends trashed the house, doubtless severely impacting the money he got when it was sold.

I don't know what became of him, but he's probably dead by now. One of my brother's friends, who also had a bad drug problem, died at 47. Most people who knew him were surprised he lived that long.

It's nice to think letting people fail is the right choice which helps them, but more often than not they just fail. There's no helping them up. I don't know what the right answer is. Honestly, even though I feel sorry for addicts and drunks, sometimes I think the best course is to just give them lots more of what they crave. They're bent on self-destruction anyway, let them just get it over with as soon as possible, without robbing people to pay for their habit.
Your grandfather had the right idea.

I actually EDC a lighter. Though I don't smoke. Never have.
They're not useful at all in an urban setting. But hey, ability to instantly make fire. Anyway, one time, couple of very young teens approached me after I parked my car. One of them asked me for a light. Told him "Sorry, don't have one." He glances down at my hand an apologizes. He saw what he thought was a lighter in my hand, but a closer look and he realized it was just my bulky car key-fob (switch-blade fob with the key portion folded in).

Yeah, I could have pulled out my Bic lighter. Heck, could have let him keep it. Given him what he wanted most. But he didn't look older than 14, and I had recently lost a good friend to lung Cancer. Kid wants to fork up his lungs and his life, he can do so without my help.

Honestly, even to an adult who has been smoking for decades, ask me for a light.... I'm going to lie to you about having one.
 
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jtr1962

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Nov 22, 2003
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Flushing, NY
I actually EDC a lighter. Though I don't smoke. Never have.
They're not useful at all in an urban setting. But hey, ability to instantly make fire.
There's actually an even better alternative to lighters:


No need to refill with lighter fluid. Just recharge. It sets paper or pretty much anything else combustible on fire instantly. I bought one for when drafts blow out the pilot lights on the stove. Useful for lots of other things besides.


Yeah, I could have pulled out my Bic lighter. Heck, could have let him keep it. Given him what he wanted most. But he didn't look older than 14, and I had recently lost a good friend to lung Cancer. Kid wanks to fork up his lungs and his life, he can do so without my help.

Honestly, even to an adult who has been smoking for decades, ask me for a light.... I'm going to lie to you about having one.
Same here. I've had kids ask me to buy them smokes. I outright refused. I even give them the lecture on why smoking is an awful idea. Hopefully that gets through to at least some of them.
 
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