Canada to go to all zero emission passenger vehicles by 2035

Status
Not open for further replies.

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
377
Location
San Francisco
My house is all electric, built new in the 1970s. My electric bill is eating me alive. I do have two fireplaces, and a few acres of trees to cut down and burn. I think mrfixitman has talked me into cutting them down and burning them in my fireplaces. Then I can save on my electric bill. Maybe I'll get it down to $500 for the year. :grin2:
My uncle in Ohio ran a boiler off 30 acres of hardwood. Made money selling it off. Lived cheap. Smart guy.
 

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
377
Location
San Francisco
Btw just wondering how many other here have worked on cars? I have a course more a shade tree mechanic.but I replaced engines in cars trannies installed clutches cv joined head gaskets etc etc. may try to get a job as a helper locally I forgot a lot as I aged. But I do know a electric motor is way more simple to rebuild then a ice
I used to build electric conversions. Forklift motor Curtis controller.Golfcart batteries. An adapter on the transmission. Simple.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,480
You would love it here everyone on my community has golf carts not me I have e-bikes. But the other use golf carts for everything. I like them so simple. And easy to give more power
 

IMA SOL MAN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 18, 2023
Messages
2,125
Location
The HEART of the USA.
Solar panels are cheap last I checked mine only run my e-bikes but can run my fridge not my hvac well can run my hvac but I'll loose power I need more panels . May get more but there hard to wire up
522022 LIST OF GOODS PRODUCED BY CHILD LABOR OR FORCED LABOR
How China's Forced Labor Impacts Solar
Supply Chains Worldwide
Polysilicon is a key input in the production of solar
modules, and nearly half of the world's solar-grade
polysilicon comes from Xinjiang, a region in western
China. Polysilicon is used by some of the biggest
solar companies in China to produce photovoltaic
ingots and photovoltaic wafers, which become solar
cells and panels. By U.S. Department of Energy
estimates, Chinese companies own over 75 percent
of global capacity for manufacturing wafers, cells,
and modules. Along with the practice of mixing
polysilicon from different sources, it is highly likely
that polysilicon from Xinjiang ends up in solar
products produced in China.
This is a problem because of China's state-sponsored
forced labor and human rights abuses against over
one million Uyghurs and Muslim minorities in
Xinjiang and in other parts of China. (36) Many of
these solar products containing inputs produced
with forced labor are used domestically in China.
However, China's leading role in solar supply chains
raises forced labor risks for any business importing
solar products, which, absent extensive due diligence,
have a high likelihood of containing inputs made
with forced labor in China. Some of these products
may enter the U.S. directly from China: in 2020, the
U.S. imported about 5 percent of its solar cells and
modules from China. In addition, without careful
due diligence, companies may be at risk of importing
goods with inputs made with forced labor into
the U.S. from third countries. In 2020, countries
imported over $24 billion in solar cells and modules
from China, representing 42 percent of all solar
module imports worldwide and including some of
the U.S.'s biggest solar trade partners. Meanwhile,
Chinese solar companies own or have subsidiaries
around the world, and some of them are directly
linked with Xinjiang's forced labor program. ILAB's
research indicates that further downstream silica-
based products, including additional solar products
and semi-conductors, may be at risk. Read more
about the various products at risk in Figure 14

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA),
signed into law in December 2021, establishes a
rebuttable presumption that goods made wholly or
in part in Xinjiang, or produced by certain entities
included on the UFLPA Entity List, are made with
forced labor. Based on this presumption, these goods
are subject to the import prohibition under Section
307 of the Tariff Act, which prohibits the import of
goods made wholly or in part with forced labor. The
law specifically names polysilicon as a high-priority
sector for enforcement. The Department of Labor's
reporting, tools, resources, and expertise inform
the UFLPA's strategy and are valuable resources for
companies to safeguard their solar supply chains
from forced labor. Learn more about how polysilicon
from Xinjiang may find its way into solar supply
chains globally in Figure 15.

Pages 52 and 53. https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/fi...ports/tda2021/2022-TVPRA-List-of-Goods-v3.pdf
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,480
522022 LIST OF GOODS PRODUCED BY CHILD LABOR OR FORCED LABOR
How China's Forced Labor Impacts Solar
Supply Chains Worldwide
Polysilicon is a key input in the production of solar
modules, and nearly half of the world's solar-grade
polysilicon comes from Xinjiang, a region in western
China. Polysilicon is used by some of the biggest
solar companies in China to produce photovoltaic
ingots and photovoltaic wafers, which become solar
cells and panels. By U.S. Department of Energy
estimates, Chinese companies own over 75 percent
of global capacity for manufacturing wafers, cells,
and modules. Along with the practice of mixing
polysilicon from different sources, it is highly likely
that polysilicon from Xinjiang ends up in solar
products produced in China.
This is a problem because of China's state-sponsored
forced labor and human rights abuses against over
one million Uyghurs and Muslim minorities in
Xinjiang and in other parts of China. (36) Many of
these solar products containing inputs produced
with forced labor are used domestically in China.
However, China's leading role in solar supply chains
raises forced labor risks for any business importing
solar products, which, absent extensive due diligence,
have a high likelihood of containing inputs made
with forced labor in China. Some of these products
may enter the U.S. directly from China: in 2020, the
U.S. imported about 5 percent of its solar cells and
modules from China. In addition, without careful
due diligence, companies may be at risk of importing
goods with inputs made with forced labor into
the U.S. from third countries. In 2020, countries
imported over $24 billion in solar cells and modules
from China, representing 42 percent of all solar
module imports worldwide and including some of
the U.S.'s biggest solar trade partners. Meanwhile,
Chinese solar companies own or have subsidiaries
around the world, and some of them are directly
linked with Xinjiang's forced labor program. ILAB's
research indicates that further downstream silica-
based products, including additional solar products
and semi-conductors, may be at risk. Read more
about the various products at risk in Figure 14

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA),
signed into law in December 2021, establishes a
rebuttable presumption that goods made wholly or
in part in Xinjiang, or produced by certain entities
included on the UFLPA Entity List, are made with
forced labor. Based on this presumption, these goods
are subject to the import prohibition under Section
307 of the Tariff Act, which prohibits the import of
goods made wholly or in part with forced labor. The
law specifically names polysilicon as a high-priority
sector for enforcement. The Department of Labor's
reporting, tools, resources, and expertise inform
the UFLPA's strategy and are valuable resources for
companies to safeguard their solar supply chains
from forced labor. Learn more about how polysilicon
from Xinjiang may find its way into solar supply
chains globally in Figure 15.

Pages 52 and 53. https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/fi...ports/tda2021/2022-TVPRA-List-of-Goods-v3.pdf
I'll be honest I'm good for a few paragraphs but more then that I get side tracked . But if you ever have the time on a day I have the time we can call each other I'm a bit better verbally then thru text. But even then my attention span sucks lol
 

kaichu dento

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
6,554
Location
現在の世界

vicv

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
2,866
Location
Southern Ontario
522022 LIST OF GOODS PRODUCED BY CHILD LABOR OR FORCED LABOR
How China's Forced Labor Impacts Solar
Supply Chains Worldwide
Polysilicon is a key input in the production of solar
modules, and nearly half of the world's solar-grade
polysilicon comes from Xinjiang, a region in western
China. Polysilicon is used by some of the biggest
solar companies in China to produce photovoltaic
ingots and photovoltaic wafers, which become solar
cells and panels. By U.S. Department of Energy
estimates, Chinese companies own over 75 percent
of global capacity for manufacturing wafers, cells,
and modules. Along with the practice of mixing
polysilicon from different sources, it is highly likely
that polysilicon from Xinjiang ends up in solar
products produced in China.
This is a problem because of China's state-sponsored
forced labor and human rights abuses against over
one million Uyghurs and Muslim minorities in
Xinjiang and in other parts of China. (36) Many of
these solar products containing inputs produced
with forced labor are used domestically in China.
However, China's leading role in solar supply chains
raises forced labor risks for any business importing
solar products, which, absent extensive due diligence,
have a high likelihood of containing inputs made
with forced labor in China. Some of these products
may enter the U.S. directly from China: in 2020, the
U.S. imported about 5 percent of its solar cells and
modules from China. In addition, without careful
due diligence, companies may be at risk of importing
goods with inputs made with forced labor into
the U.S. from third countries. In 2020, countries
imported over $24 billion in solar cells and modules
from China, representing 42 percent of all solar
module imports worldwide and including some of
the U.S.'s biggest solar trade partners. Meanwhile,
Chinese solar companies own or have subsidiaries
around the world, and some of them are directly
linked with Xinjiang's forced labor program. ILAB's
research indicates that further downstream silica-
based products, including additional solar products
and semi-conductors, may be at risk. Read more
about the various products at risk in Figure 14

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA),
signed into law in December 2021, establishes a
rebuttable presumption that goods made wholly or
in part in Xinjiang, or produced by certain entities
included on the UFLPA Entity List, are made with
forced labor. Based on this presumption, these goods
are subject to the import prohibition under Section
307 of the Tariff Act, which prohibits the import of
goods made wholly or in part with forced labor. The
law specifically names polysilicon as a high-priority
sector for enforcement. The Department of Labor's
reporting, tools, resources, and expertise inform
the UFLPA's strategy and are valuable resources for
companies to safeguard their solar supply chains
from forced labor. Learn more about how polysilicon
from Xinjiang may find its way into solar supply
chains globally in Figure 15.

Pages 52 and 53. https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/fi...ports/tda2021/2022-TVPRA-List-of-Goods-v3.pdf
Unfortunately America is using a lot of child labour now too. It's mostly migrant children from Mexico and central/South America so people don't really care as much, but it's gotten pretty big. Those little hands are just so dexterous and efficient
 

Buff

Enlightened
Joined
Dec 21, 2023
Messages
382
Location
North Carolina Mountains
Unfortunately everything we use is made of fossil fuel. Not just what is "burned" in our ICE vehicles. I hope everyone is willing to give up their higher standard of life and freedom that our globalist overlords certainly won't. And that is still on topic as mandates in canada are also being forced here in america
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,416
Location
Dust in the Wind
Let the markets and ingenuity bring about this change and let the people decide what changes are good for them.
One reason the "market" chose the horseless carriage was because of pollution. Yup, those turd covered streets in big cities led the masses to choose the horseless carriage once they were widely available.

IMG_2794.jpeg


Now it took a time but eventually there were enough feedding troughs we call gas stations to keep them going. No gubment mandates would have worked until the nation had enough ways to fuel the horseless carriage.

The same will happen with electric cars eventually. Those folks who rode around in their horseless carriages all looking down their noses at the rest had no idea how come the rest chose to keep using the current mode of transportation. It took about 40 years but eventually all but a select few like the Amish culture chose the horseless carriage.
 

Guitar Guy

Enlightened
Joined
Oct 23, 2016
Messages
590
Location
West Virginia
Unfortunately America is using a lot of child labour now too. It's mostly migrant children from Mexico and central/South America so people don't really care as much, but it's gotten pretty big. Those little hands are just so dexterous and efficient
As of months ago, there were over 85,000 missing children in the USA. I seriously think there are many more in the sex trafficking industry than there are in manufacturing. Hard to tell what that number has grown to by now, with the numbers coming across both borders, and un-reported gotaways. A vey large segment of Americans care more about pets than they do children.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,295
Location
Pacific N.W.

The Electric Car Con Explained

By William Levin
Is electricity a source of energy? Most people will answer yes, which is incorrect. Electricity carries energy but it is not itself a source of energy, which in the U.S. is supplied 60% by natural gas and coal, 18% nuclear and 22% renewables (hydro, solar and wind).
The related question is whether cars are a major consumer of energy and hence a significant contributor of Co2 emissions? Again, most people believe both statements are self-evidently true, hence the importance of moving to electric cars. https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2024/01/the_electric_car_con_explained.html
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,327
That parallels the 5th largest economy in the world. More opportunity for crime. Seems we are off topic.
YEA, after over hundred of billion of federal money injected into its economy, actually we are right on topic.
California depends on federal funding to sustain a wide range of important public services and systems. In fact, more than $105 billion in the 2017-18 state budget comes from the federal government.
 

mrfixitman

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 16, 2023
Messages
377
Location
San Francisco
My house is all electric, built new in the 1970s. My electric bill is eating me alive. I do have two fireplaces, and a few acres of trees to cut down and burn. I think mrfixitman has talked me into cutting them down and burning them in my fireplaces. Then I can save on my electric bill. Maybe I'll get it down to $500 for the year. :grin2:
Might help to get rid of resistive heating and cooking. Induction cooktop and heat pumps. I have three individual 120vac hobs. Put them away to chop food. Then use blender or slow cooker. Saves space as we have a 120vac French Door oven. 16 inch Pizza. Small bird if you wish.
Not even trying to hide it here! LoL

No, I mean, oh never mind, you saved me the time with some good examples of it here...

One thing is sure, your pie in the sky is coming to you thanks to fuels you don't seem to think much of.
Pepsi is using Tesla Semi"s. Just a matter of time till the word gets out on reduced maintenance and better hill climbing. Money always wins.
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,327
Damn it came to an end? I was enjoying that.
Please can we just all agree that we disagree? You will never ever ever EVER! change anyones mind that is made up.
hello no, it is still on.
Oh i know, i just like debunking liberal lies.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest posts

Top