is the Inova X5 direct drive?

rockz4532

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is the Inova X5 direct drive? on flashlightreviews.com it says it doesnt have regulation, but the runtime graph shows something, it looks like regulated to me. Is it?
 

Tythagoras

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I have seen a photo of a dissasembled X5 and it's direct drive. The LEDs are wired to some SMT resistors to control the current.

This was the X5 "tactical" variant, the other variants might be substantially different, but it seems unlikely.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Yes, the Inova X5 is direct drive. However, it does use lithium batteries and has decent runtime. This allows it to take full advantage of the flat discharge curve of the lithium batteries. The result is that it runs like it's regulated but has one less part to fail. The only disadvantage of this setup is that higher voltage lithium ion batteries will ruin the l.e.d.s since there is no buck circuit to bring down the voltage. Don't use rechargeables in this light.
 

d_rasp

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Glad I decided to read this thread, I was foolishly using my AWs in my X5! Great, simple old lights.
 

thermal guy

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Take the tail cap off, lick your finger and touch the battery.If she lights it's direct drive.
 

StarHalo

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The old Flashlightreviews.com review would suggest that it's not regulated; http://flashlightreviews.com/reviews/inova_x5t.htm

Glad I decided to read this thread, I was foolishly using my AWs in my X5! Great, simple old lights.

What does it look like when you do this? Does the blue hue get worse? Running li-ions is obviously not recommended since the X5 isn't set up to accept 8+ volts, but since it's just 5mm LEDs in a $30 flashlight, what the hey..
 

ICUDoc

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It uses SM resistors to each LED, so is unregulated. I took mine to bits and put a regulated driver, upgraded LEDs and AWs rechargeables in there. All good fun.
 

Illum

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the inova X5 I think only consumes about 200 ma through resistors

heres a breakdown



the resistors are on the flipside of that PCB
 

d_rasp

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What does it look like when you do this? Does the blue hue get worse? Running li-ions is obviously not recommended since the X5 isn't set up to accept 8+ volts, but since it's just 5mm LEDs in a $30 flashlight, what the hey..

No, actually. I lost my P3D Q5 in early Sept. and dug up my old X5 to sub as a work light assuming I'd find the Fenix. The old X5 did a fine job for almost 6 weeks while I hemmed & hawed about what light(s) to get next. I put a pair of SF primaries in tonight and the beam looks about the same as I remember, but a little dimmer. MAYBE a bit whiter. . .
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I fried my first Inova X5 using lithium ions. The Ultralast batteries said they were 3.0 volts right on the cells. They were 4.2 volts after charging. Don't believe that all lithium ion batteries are 3.0 volts, even if they say they are. They can still fry an Inova X5.
 

Marduke

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I fried my first Inova X5 using lithium ions. The Ultralast batteries said they were 3.0 volts right on the cells. They were 4.2 volts after charging. Don't believe that all lithium ion batteries are 3.0 volts, even if they say they are. They can still fry an Inova X5.

No Li-Ion cell is 3.0v. Because of the chemistry, they are all 3.7v nominal, ~4.2v fully charged.
 

Stainz

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My X5 has, sad to say, been relegated to getting the 'dim' CR123s from my 6PLs. It seems as bright as with the new cells in it, possibly due to it's normal low current demand. It is a great floody lamp - and a decent way to eek out the remaining energy from the CR123s. Don't mix, of course... two same use at a time, only!

Of course, assuming that the LEDs are ~4V, that means that a third of the CR123s' energy is dissipated as heat in the resistors. Cost effective in an inexpensive and dated design, just not very efficient, cell energy-wise.

Stainz
 

Hooked on Fenix

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No Li-Ion cell is 3.0v. Because of the chemistry, they are all 3.7v nominal, ~4.2v fully charged.

That's not entirely true. There are some newer Lithium Polymer batteries that are naturally closer to 3 volts and they are a safer chemistry, but they tend to be lower in capacity. There are also some lithium ion batteries that have a circuit in them that drops the voltage closer to 3 volts after a fraction of a second. That fraction of a second will blow a regular bulb but is supposed to be okay with l.e.d.s.
 

Marduke

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That's not entirely true. There are some newer Lithium Polymer batteries that are naturally closer to 3 volts and they are a safer chemistry, but they tend to be lower in capacity. There are also some lithium ion batteries that have a circuit in them that drops the voltage closer to 3 volts after a fraction of a second. That fraction of a second will blow a regular bulb but is supposed to be okay with l.e.d.s.

Li-Ion != Li-Po cells. They are a totally different chemistry.

I do not count integral buck circuits on the cell as being a true 3.0v chemistry. It's like saying the TK10 is only a 3.7v light, because that's what it bucks the voltage to.
 
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