Butter and Bread and Sandwiches Oh My! (II)

Poppy

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This morning I picked up a package of chicken thighs. 4 lbs @ $1.19 a lb.
I got a package of soup vegetables/greens, and cut them up. I added half a gallon of water, some seasoning, a cup of rice, and the chicken.

I let it boil for 20 minutes, and let it set. I pulled the chicken out, and removed the bones and skin, and shredded the meat. I had to add another quart of water to make it soup, instead of soup you could eat with a fork!

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Later I'll have it with some chunks of French Bread with lots of butter.

It could use some more salt, so I'll probably coat it with some grated parmesan cheese.
 

kerneldrop

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It takes great sweet potatoes to make this dish shine.
95% of the secret to Michelin star restaurants is the quality of their ingredients....we simply cannot buy what they can buy.
I mean of course their technique is world-class....

If you roast the sweet potatoes in the oven for an hour plus then the sweetness will greatly intensify.
I've never had a sweet sweet potato that was sauteed.
Not sure I'd add garlic unless it was roasted, bringing out the sweetness.
Cayenne pepper is interesting...i'd omit it because it doesn't pair well with a sweet potato?
The onions should be deeply caramelized to enhance the sweetness.
Then at the end you pass it all through a sieve to make it silky smooth.
 

pnwoutdoors

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It takes great sweet potatoes to make this dish shine.
95% of the secret to Michelin star restaurants is the quality of their ingredients....we simply cannot buy what they can buy.
I mean of course their technique is world-class....

If you roast the sweet potatoes in the oven for an hour plus then the sweetness will greatly intensify.
I've never had a sweet sweet potato that was sauteed.
Not sure I'd add garlic unless it was roasted, bringing out the sweetness.
Cayenne pepper is interesting...i'd omit it because it doesn't pair well with a sweet potato?
The onions should be deeply caramelized to enhance the sweetness.
Then at the end you pass it all through a sieve to make it silky smooth.

^ This. Quality of ingredients + technique is all. Amazing how slightly altering the preparation (ie, via roasting) can enhance things.

Here's one recipe I've not yet tried, but soon will: Classic Potato Leek Soup @ A Couple Cooks. It calls for Russet potatoes, but it can be easily made with sweet potatoes instead. Very fresh ingredients, of course. Roasted veggies prior to cooking down, of course. A flavorful vegetable broth, of course, ideally homemade. I'd go light on the onions, to help the flavor of the leeks, potatoes and herbs come through. This one's with heavy cream, and easy on the herbs. Myself, I generally prefer more "punch" from herbs, so I'd probably add more thyme and make it a more savory via adding some sage and rosemary, along with a dusting of a good smoked paprika over each serving. Another herb to keep the flavors brighter is fenugreek (methi) leaves. A good garnish might be finely diced chives, on top of each serving.

Another thing I've found is that habanero peppers can dramatically bring out the flavors of other vegetables that get cooked down in a soup. Roasted, then minced, a teaspoon (even a tablespoon) of the stuff in a smaller batch of soup can lend a flavor boost without adding much heat. (Perhaps not an ideal addition for a creamy potato-leek soup, but it's worth considering.)
 

Poppy

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IDK, something is missing.
Here's the recipe
Cayenne pepper is interesting...i'd omit it because it doesn't pair well with a sweet potato?
The onions should be deeply caramelized to enhance the sweetness.
Then at the end you pass it all through a sieve to make it silky smooth.
I didn't add Cayenne pepper, maybe I should have, or maybe added a jalapeno pepper (I didn't have).
Passing it through a sieve sounds like a good idea. It may be the texture that I'm not fond of.

Roasting the ingredients also sounds like a good idea. Maybe add a little smokiness flavor to it. Now THAT sounds like a good idea.
 
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kerneldrop

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I made pizza. I make the sauce with just San Marzano tomatoes. Crust is just all purpose flour and herbs. The flour type only starts to matter when you let the dough ferment over several days…if you make it and cook it on the same day then the flours are nearly indistinguishable

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