Streamlight Wedge XT

letschat7

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You are holding it wrong then.
For as much as I paid for it I feel entitled to hold it however I wish. But seriously the battery compartment is like a clip, it looks like it has grips like a 1911 or something, and it has that groove for your trigger finger, almost.

Inb4 I get flamed for saying clip instead of magazine. :p
 

Monocrom

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You're really slippin', Bro'! I know it's late there, but I don't even understand this post. I think you and the YT yahoo might want to check with, say, Amphenol. In case you've never heard of them either, they practically invented Mil-Spec connectors. This is 2023. If you're 'skeptical' of Amphenol, I don't have anything to say about that. You can be (and will be) as skeptical as you like; but if you want to learn something, here's just one example, FYI:

Again, I'm not the sort that a company can urinate down my back, tell me it's raining; and I'm going to just automatically believe them. You can pretend my skepticism is silly, foolish, and not worth giving serious consideration. Not the first time someone tried that. Likely won't be the last. Didn't work in the past. Not going to work now.

Easiest way to test it.... Well, my Original Streamlight version is literally sitting several feet away from my monitor. But I'm not heading to the bathroom nor the kitchen and just splashing a small bit of water onto the exposed USB port to find out. Sorry, not happening.

You can ignore what I posted above regarding that shill, but doubt other members will. A simple search on YouTube still turns up his video, and his recommendation for a cover. With his hopes that Streamlight corrects the issue. They never did. But thankfully someone on Etsy did.

You want me to believe that an exposed charging port has somehow been made basically water-proof (or extremely water-resistant) while still remaining exposed on the outside. And, being able to work properly with no issues. Yeah, just squeeze the two ends together as tight as possible while still allowing a charging cable to push them apart and get in there. That is never going to be as water-tight as a rubberized or silicone cover placed literally over the opening to block out the rain. Plus, that solution already exists. Company wanted to waste their time and money on R&D for an alternative that doesn't work as well? Fair enough. It's their money to waste.

Forget Fat-Free Ham, this is more like how Automakers nowadays are insisting that their transmission fluids NEVER need to be changed for the Life of the automobile. Ask literally any independent mechanic if that's true. After they're done laughing, they'll tell you it's a blatant lie. Unless you believe the B.S. that every Automaker is currently supporting, just so they can sell more cars. Namely, that the Life of an Automobile ends instantly when the Odometer hits 100,000 miles. Meanwhile, there are certain models, usual certain trucks, that if maintained properly with fluid changes can do 300,000 miles before they're done.

BOTTOM LINE:
It's my money. Something goes wrong, I doubt Streamlight (a company I actually personally like) is going to compensate me for my time and damaged light. But that's minor. I work in a setting in which I literally need my lights to work reliably. Yes, at times in the pouring rain; at night. (I'm not always just kicking out ridiculous young trespassers in cars mommy and daddy bought for them, but didn't bother actually raising them properly.) Something goes wrong, people can get seriously hurt. That's no joke. Not an exaggeration. And, I'm not going to take a stupid risk of that happening just because ANY company says, "Nope! You're good."

EDIT: Clarification.
 
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letschat7

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I really dislike USB ports on my lights and on the battery isn't much better. It isn't a mobile phone and if you don't know how to use a charger maybe stick to Everready and Super Heavy Duty batteries.
 

DRW

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I really dislike USB ports on my lights and on the battery isn't much better. It isn't a mobile phone and if you don't know how to use a charger maybe stick to Everready and Super Heavy Duty batteries.
This is another topic where we disagree.

Not only do I know what a handgun feels like in the hand, its nothing like a flashlight o_O.

I won't buy a light that doesn't have USB C charging built in, and it must be waterproof. For example, Fenix USB C are waterproof, the rubber is just a dust shield, as are the screw port covers.

I got rid of my external charger and won't buy a battery with a USB charging port built in.
 
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I've owned and disassembled two of the original Wedges. While the internal design of the port appears to be water resistant (double layers of O-rings), the lack of a cover doesn't address the issue of debris entering the external part of the port. I do like the aftermarket Etsy solution, but the need for it really depends on the end user. I think Streamlight should include it and instructions for removal/installation and left up to the end user to decide.
 

Monocrom

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I really dislike USB ports on my lights and on the battery isn't much better. It isn't a mobile phone and if you don't know how to use a charger maybe stick to Everready and Super Heavy Duty batteries.
Not a fan of those either. But at least with the flashlight models that have a port on their batteries, you can replace the battery if the port gets wet or damaged. You still have the water sealed flashlight itself protecting the port on the battery. Plus, if you forget to pack your charger while going on a trip, you can easily use your phone's charging cable and other phone accessories to still charge up the battery.

You can do the same with a flashlight that has a built-in port. And, thankfully every other flashlight maker on the planet provides a rubberized cover for the port on their lights. But opening and closing that cover just prematurely wears it out. I see it as an emergency charging option ONLY. A good single-bay charger is the best way to go.
 

rwolfenstein

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Not a fan of those either. But at least with the flashlight models that have a port on their batteries, you can replace the battery if the port gets wet or damaged. You still have the water sealed flashlight itself protecting the port on the battery. Plus, if you forget to pack your charger while going on a trip, you can easily use your phone's charging cable and other phone accessories to still charge up the battery.

You can do the same with a flashlight that has a built-in port. And, thankfully every other flashlight maker on the planet provides a rubberized cover for the port on their lights. But opening and closing that cover just prematurely wears it out. I see it as an emergency charging option ONLY. A good single-bay charger is the best way to go.
I guess by now in this day and age, we are expecting flashlights to go to hell and back as far as reliability. TBH, I have always seen Streamlight as just cheap cop lights that serve the purpose they need to and when they die, no one cares cause they issue you a new one. Its the exact reason I keep a more premium light on hand in my pocket in case my Stinger takes a dump.
 

bykfixer

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Several years ago Coast came out with a rechargeable HP7 the HP7R. To access the usb port you twist the tailcap and slide it from covering the port. No rubber cover/dust cap needed. The 18650 battery pack also has a charge port in case you need the light while you charge the battery. And it has a battery pack to hold 4 primaries to keep going while the battery charges. I think that was around 2014 or so. It's still one of the flashlights I hold in high regard for those reasons. I think Coast products are over priced for what you get but I've not had one fail on me yet. Not trying to turn this into a Coast thread, just sayin' as smart ideas come from Streamlight on a regular basis why not a way to slide away a portion of their rechargeable lights to cover/uncover the charge port?
 

Monocrom

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I guess by now in this day and age, we are expecting flashlights to go to hell and back as far as reliability. TBH, I have always seen Streamlight as just cheap cop lights that serve the purpose they need to and when they die, no one cares cause they issue you a new one. Its the exact reason I keep a more premium light on hand in my pocket in case my Stinger takes a dump.
I remember what you said awhile back regarding your occupation. I'm a bit surprised at your outlook. Something that can withstand the rigors of police work, needs to be tough and durable. Incorporating that into a light isn't going to be cheap from an R&D point of view. Plus, making it reliable too. Seems like some police departments replace the whole light when the rechargeable battery-stick finally can't hold a charge. They don't care. Not their money. Those sticks are replaceable. Hopefully they at least swap out the lamps on those older incandescent Stinger models.

But hell and back.... and to hell again, in terms of reliability? Yeah, those already existed for decades with certain flashlight models. Especially from SureFire. Simple as you can get, genuine tactical lights. Especially SureFire's M-series of lights back when incandescent lamps is what you used for output, and LEDs were just nice little keychain lights for runtime.

I'll fling both my Leef-bodied M4 and my Stock M6 high into the air, walk away; let them land onto the sidewalk. Glass lens might have a crack in it depending on how they land. But both would fire up immediately. M-series lights specifically designed to take a fall or a hard hit, and keep working. Really don't think asking for extreme reliability nowadays is asking for too much, when it existed 20 years ago.
 

Monocrom

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Coasts lights do work however unless it is Coast Led Lenser I ain't buying any.
I'll buy certain Coast models. Though yeah, I prefer LED Lenser. Better quality. It's like the same relationship with Old Navy, and GAP. Those items not good enough for GAP get sold through their Old Navy outlets. Once bought a thick leather belt at Old Navy. Black. To this day, after decades of buying countless black leather belts.... It's the only one where the dye job soaked through and ruined the waist-line of a pair of tan cargo shorts. Literally the only one. And I've bought no-name leather belts from shady street-merchants selling clothing items on the streets of Manhattan.
 

rwolfenstein

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I remember what you said awhile back regarding your occupation. I'm a bit surprised at your outlook. Something that can withstand the rigors of police work, needs to be tough and durable. Incorporating that into a light isn't going to be cheap from an R&D point of view. Plus, making it reliable too. Seems like some police departments replace the whole light when the rechargeable battery-stick finally can't hold a charge. They don't care. Not their money. Those sticks are replaceable. Hopefully they at least swap out the lamps on those older incandescent Stinger models.

But hell and back.... and to hell again, in terms of reliability? Yeah, those already existed for decades with certain flashlight models. Especially from SureFire. Simple as you can get, genuine tactical lights. Especially SureFire's M-series of lights back when incandescent lamps is what you used for output, and LEDs were just nice little keychain lights for runtime.

I'll fling both my Leef-bodied M4 and my Stock M6 high into the air, walk away; let them land onto the sidewalk. Glass lens might have a crack in it depending on how they land. But both would fire up immediately. M-series lights specifically designed to take a fall or a hard hit, and keep working. Really don't think asking for extreme reliability nowadays is asking for too much, when it existed 20 years ago.
So, I will give you a pro tip on government. Big on contracts with venders and its always a cost per unit perspective. Our stingers havent been replaced since the 90s, when they die, they just grab another out of the Sgt. desk drawer and hand it to you. Some of them come with Terralux LED heads and some don't. Some come with good batteries, some don't. Its the luck of the draw. I was issued a brand new one last year, which is the standard LED DS model, to the envy of my coworkers who got issued old and busted. When people were critical of public safety budgets years ago, people thought millions of dollars were a lot. Most of our budget goes to wages and benefits, we only have a sliver for uniforms, outfitting and equipment.
 

rwolfenstein

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I remember what you said awhile back regarding your occupation. I'm a bit surprised at your outlook. Something that can withstand the rigors of police work, needs to be tough and durable. Incorporating that into a light isn't going to be cheap from an R&D point of view. Plus, making it reliable too. Seems like some police departments replace the whole light when the rechargeable battery-stick finally can't hold a charge. They don't care. Not their money. Those sticks are replaceable. Hopefully they at least swap out the lamps on those older incandescent Stinger models.

But hell and back.... and to hell again, in terms of reliability? Yeah, those already existed for decades with certain flashlight models. Especially from SureFire. Simple as you can get, genuine tactical lights. Especially SureFire's M-series of lights back when incandescent lamps is what you used for output, and LEDs were just nice little keychain lights for runtime.

I'll fling both my Leef-bodied M4 and my Stock M6 high into the air, walk away; let them land onto the sidewalk. Glass lens might have a crack in it depending on how they land. But both would fire up immediately. M-series lights specifically designed to take a fall or a hard hit, and keep working. Really don't think asking for extreme reliability nowadays is asking for too much, when it existed 20 years ago.
Back at my previous employment before I became an employee of the government, they private company I worked for (security) issued us Streamlight SL20 flashlights. They bought them because they were "law enforcement" grade. I cannot tell you how many of those damn things I would have to rebuild because of their ceramic base reflectors for the bulb or the battery would go out or the switch unit. Just because things say Law Enforcement grade, doesnt mean it holds up to the riggers of security, public safety work, law enforcement or any other division of such.
 

Monocrom

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Back at my previous employment before I became an employee of the government, they private company I worked for (security) issued us Streamlight SL20 flashlights. They bought them because they were "law enforcement" grade. I cannot tell you how many of those damn things I would have to rebuild because of their ceramic base reflectors for the bulb or the battery would go out or the switch unit. Just because things say Law Enforcement grade, doesnt mean it holds up to the riggers of security, public safety work, law enforcement or any other division of such.
I'll be honest, I never even heard of that term until now. Sounds like marketing hype to sell more flashlights than anything else. Apparently it's working too.
 

rwolfenstein

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I'll be honest, I never even heard of that term until now. Sounds like marketing hype to sell more flashlights than anything else. Apparently it's working too.

Well I know someone who used to work for a smaller agency in Parole and Probation, his equipment supplier was a gal whos husband worked for the state police. They loved Pelican lights and bought a bunch of those multifuel ones. I believe it was a 7620, anyways it uses either 18650 with a spacer, 2 AAs or 3 CR123s. Its a great idea but the state police and this agency threw away the spacers/liners for use with multifuel and supplied them with only CR123s. Whenever the light got lost, they would crack open a new package and hand him a new one. There is a lot of waste in government and sometimes its with dumb things. Other times they wont buy new equipment at all but will spend their whole fleet budget on sending cars to be serviced at dealerships.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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Last time I went through my local PD's Citizens Academy, the LEOs on the force had to provide their own back up gun (BUG). I think that was wrong, they should have been issued a BUG. Well, new chief now, and I don't know what the SOP regarding that is now.
 

rwolfenstein

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Last time I went through my local PD's Citizens Academy, the LEOs on the force had to provide their own back up gun (BUG). I think that was wrong, they should have been issued a BUG. Well, new chief now, and I don't know what the SOP regarding that is now.
That is also true up here, I have never met a cop who was supplied with a back up. Which is rather funny cause they will have department policies on what they can carry for a back up and the qualification requirements. For me personally, I am a non sworn position so I am not required to carry a firearm.
 

Monocrom

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Oh, it's even worse than that. Just because you are "issued" a specific type of gear, and thus required to always have it on you; doesn't mean you are handed that gear free of charge and simply sign for it.

For the longest time in NYC, you'd see NYPD officers walking around with 2C-cell incandescent Black, Maglite models. Their duty-lights were issued to them. However, in reality, that meant that they were given an actual list of guide-lines/requirements that their duty-light needed to fulfill. Then they'd go out and buy with their own money the light that they were technically issued. Guessing some of the Old-Timers would pull the rookies aside, tell them to just buy a black, 2C Maglite model since that was literally the cheapest flashlight that fulfilled each and every requirement on the NYPD's list.

Yeah.... Here's your issued flashlight. Go out and buy it with your own money. No, we're not going to reimburse you. But you do get to keep it after you retire.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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I like the Stinger 2020. Not only is it compatable with LED Stinger charger but it reminds me of a handgun when I hold it.
In what way does this "stick" remind you of a handgun? There is no vertical grip.

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