Poll... light reflective outer wear Yes or No

Do you prefer to wear outerwear that has 3M type light reflectivity?


  • Total voters
    12

Poppy

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3m type reflective one or two inch cloth is sewn into highway safety vests etc.
3M type reflective piping is sometimes used in outerwear/sportswear.

All things being equal which would you prefer to purchase? Outer wear with, or without light reflective material?

EDIT... This is meant to include reflective piping which is only 1/8" or 3mm in diameter. Not to mean exclusively 1/2" or 3/4" material like in a safety vest.
An example of where one may see 3mm piping is along the rim of a baseball cap.
 
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Poppy

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Far too often, IMO people walk the dark streets, wearing dark, or non-reflective clothing. Far too often, I come upon a person walking in the street, who is barely visible until they are directly in the beam of my headlights. I love it when I see a person wearing clothing that has reflective piping, or even larger reflective material sewn into their clothing.

Personally if given the option of something with reflective piping or not, I would buy it with.
Last year, I bought a cabella's gray winter coat. It is a gore-tex shell, with a fleece liner. It has velcro in a number of places, including cinch straps at the wrists. The only drawback of the coat was that the exposed velcro on the sleeves sometimes got caught on the velcro on the zipper storm flap. A real PIA. I bought some velcro, and cut it to length to cover the exposed velcro hooks in the sleeves and attached it. I had a neighbor sew some 1 inch 3M tape to it so that it serves a purpose, and looks like it belongs there.

I also had her sew a one inch band of 3M tape around the back collar of the hood. I am debating on sewing a one inch band around the bottom of the jacket, but I don't want it to look like an EMS Emergency Jacket.

I would really like to see more outer wear with reflective piping sewn in. It can be stylishly done, and add to the safety of all wearers. I ocassionally wear a drab green trench-coat overcoat, over my suit when there is poor visibility because.... it is raining!
 

markr6

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Only for running. But ironically, whenever I see running clothes with reflective elements, 9/10 times it seems isolated to a small 1/2" square or logo here and there. Only one garment I own has enough, a Brooks running jacket with 1" wide stripes in various places. But it's just cheap tape that is unpeeling - not sewn on.

Bottom line: if you're walking, running or cycling on or near the road, it's nice to have. When I'm running in the winter I wear the Brooks jacket mentioned above. I can see oncoming cars get over into the next lane (when possible) well in advance. Opposed to just a bright t-shirt like I was wearing last night. I was running my H600w II L2 on the H2 level but most cars didn't even try to get over (leaving them passing only 2' from me unless I got onto the shoulder)
 

PCC

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It really depends on what I intend to use the garment for. For cycling I absolutely want something with reflective elements on it. I've even stuck SOLAS reflective tape to my cycling helmets on the back side to increase its reflective ability. For my normal day to day wear I don't specifically look for something with reflective materials on it because I carry flashlights and can stand out without needing reflective material on my person. Running and cycling shoes seem to have a lot more reflective materials in use these days.

In cycling, we have what are called cycling ninjas. They're folks riding their bikes after dark with no lights, no reflectors, and no sense. Once, while riding home from work after dark in the fog, before I discovered CPF, using a dim 25 lumen headlight to light my way, I came across a few cycling ninjas and I only knew they were there because they were using echolocation to ensure they wouldn't crash into each other in the dark (they were talking as they rode down the hill I was climbing). Then, not half a mile from there, I almost hit another head on as he was riding his bike on the wrong side of the road downhill into me. My dim headlight saved us from a crash as he saw it and veered away from me at the last moment in the fog.

I've seen a few pedestrian ninjas as well. That's not good as the state of California has started to rigorously enforce an old driving law that drivers must yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and this has emboldened folks into stepping out into crosswalks with oncoming traffic that can't see them. I believe that the recent surge in pedestrian fatalities is the direct result of people thinking that the law protects them from the laws of physics when they step in front of an inattentive driver bearing down upon them.
 

LanthanumK

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I am one of those "pedestrian ninjas" walking at night wearing black clothing and no reflectors. However, I am always aware of my surroundings, including left & right turning drivers. In invisibility mode, I will generally yield to drivers. When using a crosswalk, I will give drivers the low beam on my SureFire to notify them of my presence. A high mode flash is reserved for drivers who are running me down anyway or are blinding me with their high beams on an unlit street.

On a bicycle, I use bicycle reflectors and head/taillight, but no reflective clothing. I have several reflective vests as part of my CERT (community emergency response team) duties but do not wear them unless I am performing such duties.
 

Poppy

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I have several reflective vests as part of my CERT (community emergency response team) duties but do not wear them unless I am performing such duties.

I'm also a member of our local CERT team, and the green vest they gave us initially doesn't rate as a Class II vest, (it does have SOME reflective material and would probably rate as class I except that there is no such classification). They finally gave half of our team a Class II vest and Class III rain coat.

I added 3M reflective tape to my hard hat, and I keep it and a Class II vest in the trunk of my car at all times.
 

Steve K

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This is a good issue to raise. For cycling, my commuter bike has generator powered lights running constantly, plus reflectors on the wheels, frame, front and rear. My helmet has DOT reflective material on it, and some of my clothes has reflective stuff (but not much). I bike commute all year round, so good lights are required, and are probably the most effective tool I have for being seen.

For recreational cycling, I usually have a blinkie LED light running. I prefer high visibility colors and run reflectors on the bike. I do use a battery powered headlight if I expect to be on the road near sunrise or sunset, or in heavy overcast.

When I walk at night, it's usually on a sidewalk. I'll bring a flashlight to light my path and to shine towards oncoming traffic, just so they can see me.

There has been a time or two when I've been cycling at night and come across pedestrian ninjas.. just about scared me to death! One of them had the nerve to yell at me for almost running him over. I can only assume he had no idea just how invisible he was.
 

orbital

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+

One thing about reflective outerwear: you get a range of actual Official Personnel ~ to the worlds least official people wearing it.



_________________________________________________________________ :caution: or :sick2:
 

880arm

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We have recently enacted an "enhanced visibility" policy at work (at an industrial facility) and, as a result, we have started wearing much more high visibility clothing such as jackets, vests, shirts, etc. At first I wasn't crazy about it but I have come to accept and appreciate how much of an improvement it makes. I have become a believer, even when away from work.
 

thedoc007

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I am one of those "pedestrian ninjas" walking at night wearing black clothing and no reflectors. However, I am always aware of my surroundings, including left & right turning drivers. In invisibility mode, I will generally yield to drivers.

This describes my method as well. One of the problems that I have with reflective gear is that some people honestly seem to think it excuses them from paying any attention at all to their surroundings. When I walk or run at night, I KNOW that people might well not see me. But I don't assume that any driver will yield to me, regardless of weather, time of day, pedestrian laws, etc. I ensure that I have an escape route, and I take responsibility for my own safety. I don't depend on the attentiveness of others.

This is not to say it doesn't have good uses, and I certainly do appreciate it when others wear reflective gear. I do have a few articles of clothing that have it built in, and I don't have a problem with that either. But I'm certainly not going out of my way to add reflective piping to items that don't already have it, nor do I want all my clothing to have it built in.
 

Poppy

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<snip>

There has been a time or two when I've been cycling at night and come across pedestrian ninjas.. just about scared me to death! One of them had the nerve to yell at me for almost running him over. I can only assume he had no idea just how invisible he was.

"pedestrian ninjas" I love it :) What a brilliantly descriptive term :thumbsup:
A couple of years ago, in a residential area, I slowly came around a 90 degree bend in the street at night (it was DARK!) and there were a number of high school age children walking IN THE STREET! I rolled down my window and somewhat politely explained to them that I could have killed them, and that they should be walking on the sidewalk. It was obvious from their response that they had NO CLUE regarding how invisible they were.
 

ven

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I wear a high viz vest in work over work wear for safety reasons,also have a high viz fleece.Very effective /reflective....

I can light someone up(i tend to have a habbit when letting on walking round with flashlight) from 100ft away with an AA light,glow up where as nothing around them(in false day light) shows any sign of flashlight.

I think the cheap safety vests are a good option to wear over your clothes,so a separate item,can be washed or thrown as cheap to replace.

Very effective,very cheap............the cyclists at work wear them over their bike gear coming to/from work.

Similar type to what i wear


Various ranges in caps/jackets but as indoor a vest is sufficient.

imho i think it should be compulsory for cyclist to wear reflective clothing,but in UK it proves difficult enough to use lights:shakehead on the spot fines for those who dont.........no excuses for not,a couple of $ saves a life!
 

mcnair55

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Like Mr Ven i have to wear a high viz vest when entering certain customers mainly truck workshops as part of my job,one particular customer insists on me also wearing steel toe cap shoes/boots and signing in and out of his premises for safety reasons.

I like my grand children to go to school with some sort of high viz tag on there jackets and in the UK it is common place to see escorted parties of primary school age children walking on some sort of field visit to be wearing high viz vests.

From a personal point of view my cycle clothing has high viz markings(never use it any more) I may buy a scooter this summer and would buy high viz clothing as car drivers in the UK are useless at best when it comes to seeing you on two wheels.
 

Unicorn

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No, I don't. I have a flashlight or three to make myself more visible. My dogs' leashes, poo scooters, and spray bottle, all have reflective tape though. Along with a flasher on the leash and/or collar.

If I'm on the sidewalk, person would be so screwed up, drunk, asleep, or distracted they wouldn't see me no matter what I was wearing by the time they get over the curb.
When crossing, or on streets with no sidewalk, a light will be more noticeable. It lights up the ground and where I'm at, without having to rely on reflected headlights. Active instead of passive.
 
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PCC

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This describes my method as well. One of the problems that I have with reflective gear is that some people honestly seem to think it excuses them from paying any attention at all to their surroundings. When I walk or run at night, I KNOW that people might well not see me. But I don't assume that any driver will yield to me, regardless of weather, time of day, pedestrian laws, etc. I ensure that I have an escape route, and I take responsibility for my own safety. I don't depend on the attentiveness of others.

I ride, walk, and drive this way: as if I'm invisible and always on the defensive.

imho i think it should be compulsory for cyclist to wear reflective clothing,but in UK it proves difficult enough to use lights:shakehead on the spot fines for those who dont.........no excuses for not,a couple of $ saves a life!
wven if it were required for me to wear a reflective vest while riding I wouldn't because I overheat when wearing just cycling clothes.

In California, it's required for cyclists to have, at minimum, a head and tail light when riding after dark. I went for overkill on my commuter:

DSC_0404.jpg
 

Unicorn

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Washington requires aa light visible to a certain distance and a rear reflector. I've almost never seen this.
 

baterija

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I don't prefer reflective material as a rule so it's a no. It's useful. I tend to prefer more muted tones in much of my clothing so unless the use is specifically one where I would always want to have it I avoid it. I do have a number of reflective belts that can easily be slung over a shoulder if there's a special case.
 
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