dont ever buy a build ya own shed unless you wanna turn into

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,494
btw the paint is not fading its just the plastic they cover shed with to ship im to tired toi rip the rest off and i added solar lol
 

idleprocess

Flashaholic
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Feb 29, 2004
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7,197
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decamped
A tool like this even if bought new, could save enough time that it will pay for itself with the first project. Even if you sold it afterwards at half price it would be worth it IMO.
I would have saved an immense amount of time using any other method than pilot-drilled screws. But I wanted a rock-solid build so I spent the equivalent of multiple additional weekends piloting holes.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,343
Location
Pacific N.W.
Pier blocks with a level adjustable bracket -
IMG_4640.jpeg



Their individual bases don't need to be level with each other -
IMG_4654.jpeg

The 6x6 and its support structure, are original from Dad's build some 45 years ago.

The blocks and brackets were a little pricy but well worth the cost for large projects.
IMG_4678.jpeg


How do you eat an elephant?
IMG_4806.JPG

One bite at a time. I started this project on August 1st. The Trex decking was given to me by a friend who installed new decking on a job. After cutting 44 boards to length, hand-washing them, plugging 582 original screw holes with wood filler, and applying two coats of solid color stain, they are finally being attached. Progress as of last night.

I know it's not a shed. I haven't built a shed.
 

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
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7,505
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Flushing, NY
I would have saved an immense amount of time using any other method than pilot-drilled screws. But I wanted a rock-solid build so I spent the equivalent of multiple additional weekends piloting holes.
I'm big on screwing instead of nailing myself. It also makes disassembly easier, should you need to go that route down the road.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
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Dec 20, 2012
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8,398
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Northern New Jersey
Chance,
Your project reminds me of something my best friend's dad once told me, while holding a door hinge.

You see... the problem with having a shed is that you have a place to put stuff, like this hinge. Then one day, you discover the hinge, and wonder... what can I do with this? So you go out and buy another hinge, so that now you have a pair, and come up with a project to build.

Your friend gave you some decking for free. Then you went out and bought blocks, and brackets, sand, stain, water sealing duct tape, and maybe had pay to get your blades sharpened after cutting all the free wood.

Still, I'm sure that your Mother-in-law greatly appreciates, your labor of love.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,343
Location
Pacific N.W.
Chance,
Your project reminds me of something my best friend's dad once told me, while holding a door hinge.

You see... the problem with having a shed is that you have a place to put stuff, like this hinge. Then one day, you discover the hinge, and wonder... what can I do with this? So you go out and buy another hinge, so that now you have a pair, and come up with a project to build.

Your friend gave you some decking for free. Then you went out and bought blocks, and brackets, sand, stain, water sealing duct tape, and maybe had pay to get your blades sharpened after cutting all the free wood.

Still, I'm sure that your Mother-in-law greatly appreciates, your labor of love.



IMG_4358.jpeg

Mom's deck was toast. Being gifted the Trex decking was a fortuitous happenstance.
 

Got Lumens?

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 12, 2011
Messages
2,460
Location
Champlain Valley
View attachment 48647
How I built my last shed.


View attachment 48648
Took about an hour to set it up.
If You live in a heavily populated area, many of the places that sell pre-made sheds do not purchase by the truckload.
Here in VT they do, A vacation summer homer from NJ saved over $1000 dollars buying one up here VS. buying one in NJ where he is from. He's a retired construction contractor from NJ. Some trips to P/U a pre-fab maybe worth it some cases.
 

bykfixer

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Aug 9, 2015
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Dust in the Wind
If You live in a heavily populated area, many of the places that sell pre-made sheds do not purchase by the truckload.
Here in VT they do, A vacation summer homer from NJ saved over $1000 dollars buying one up here VS. buying one in NJ where he is from. He's a retired construction contractor from NJ. Some trips to P/U a pre-fab maybe worth it some cases.
It's a solid, steel frame with alluminum roof and walls. The floor is double 3/4" marine plywood on a 6x6 frame and 6x6 joists at 16 centers. The cost to build one of wood was twice as much as I paid for the one that had been owned by somebody before me. I drilled some holes and hung peg board to be able to store a lot of stuff on the walls.

They are built at a Leonard factory in North Carolina and the Leonard "store" I bought it from (in Richmond VA) had some formerly rent to own that folks had stopped paying on. They bring it to your house, lay a level block foundation and slide it onto the foundation.


IMG_5745.jpeg

This 14x14x10 was what needed to be replaced.
I was looking at about $8k to rebuild it

IMG_2446.jpeg

All of this stuff needed to fit in an 8x10x8 building

IMG_2808.jpeg

About 99.9% of the stuff ended up fitting.

IMG_7352.jpeg

One day a bird landed on the old building and it fell over.
 

Bob2650

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Aug 1, 2021
Messages
66
Several thousand dollars were spent to store less than $500 bucks worth of stuff.
I am guilty of the same thing but I bought used "wind and watertight" grade 20' connex boxes (overseas shipping containers) to use as storage sheds. Jacked each end up and rolled a railroad tie under the end to keep it up off the dirt and reduce rust. They now cost more than twice what I paid for them 7 years ago.
When it is time to sell them I plan to convert them into "tiny homes" or cabins.
 

Got Lumens?

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Mar 12, 2011
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Champlain Valley
I bought one. Don't know if it was connex or not, but was china made originally shipped here to the states.
It is a one tripper, in really good shape. I've had it for 5 years now.

These container's do require maintenance. Power washing the roof of built up residues and leafy matter is primary. Repainting both exterior, and interior surfaces does become necessary to extend their longevity.

My next plan is to install some inexpensive(but is still overpriced lately) galvanized corrugated roofing at a 4-12 pitch on top of it to shed the buildup of organic matter, pooling water that accumulates on top of it that causes the factories paint to fail, and provide an extended sheltered access area beneath the open door's area. The new shed roof atop will also allow, re-direct, rain/snow to fall outside of the exterior walls, and not down them. The cheap paint they come with mostly only lasts for ~ 5 years, or less, before they start to rust up from the elements if not maintained. I had a chance to buy an older one for 3/4 less, but was not happy with just two vents, exterior/interior rusting, and longevity of them.
Go with the lesser if You only plan to have it for a few seasons.

Mine has not leaked, and still seals properly. Beware they do/can accumulate condensation within. I paid $4200 for the one I have now, and it is worth every penny worth IMO. The one I have is of the newer designed 20'er with four vents, instead of the older styled 20'ers that only have two vents. Older styles that have had more than two roundtrip's are considerably less money, but often have dents, scratched paint, and compromised hardwood flooring.

Best part of these container's is, no more field mice getting into stored belongings and ruining them !!!

My towns regulations considerate it a portable structure, and do not require payment of taxes upon it to have it on the property.
Check your local codes to see if You will get taxed upon it, before getting one. I know if I "built/bought" a shed, or even just a shed roofed, with no walls, with more than 140 square feet, it's considered taxable, and will raise the property's taxable rates.

I used to sell portable garages, and still have two of them. One is 12X20X8'H, the other 14X24X10'H. Ironically one of the covers lasted 10 years, and the other 17 years! They both were only rated to last 5 years each. They do last much longer being in a shaded area, versus constant exposure to direct sunlight. The prices how ever have gone way up in recent years, and the availability of them can be scarce. Both have survived many hurricanes and decades of snow loads. I've found a key is to leave the end panels unzipped to allow the positive pressures of strong winds to be mitigated, and not turn them into "kites". They used to be a cost effective solution to keep snow and rain off outdoor equipment, cars, and boats. They both paid for themselves within 3 years of ownership versus a pre-built or owner built "shed". Which may, or may not, apply to an individual's given circumstances.
GL
 
Last edited:

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,494
dont want to make a new thread due to me trying to be a better member. but i will also add dont ever install a aftermarket ceneter stand ona a motorcycle well do and don't do it. do it the end results are great but man o man what a hard job nothing lined up had tio remove so many parts from bike . and im a old dude lol. but on my bike even checking the oil requiers a center stand i have no idea why honda dont include them lol
 
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