dont ever buy a build ya own shed unless you wanna turn into

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,488
im not sure if im funny at all. my sence of humor is a bit odd and perhaps not funny at all. some dont even get my jokes at all lol
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,312
Location
Pacific N.W.
im not sure if im funny at all. my sence of humor is a bit odd and perhaps not funny at all. some dont even get my jokes at all lol
Screw them then! 😜

It's not their fault if they go to a comedy show but don't get the jokes because they can't understand what the comedian is saying.

......... Just sayin.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
13,488
im trully not funny!!!!! once i walked up to a person and said happy birthday. they say sorry its not my birthday. i look back at them and say quit ya bitching it isnt my birthday either but you dont hear me complaining
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,023
Location
NYC
I once complimented a beautiful ASMR-tist on her awesome tats.
Spellcheck jumped in and changed the vowel to a different one.
Give you one guess which it decided I meant to use.
Thankfully I had been subbed to her channel for many months.
She recognized me in her Comments section.
She figured out what had happened. And got a hearty laugh out of it.

Naturally I still apologized for accidentally and unintentionally complimenting her impressive rack. Which, by the way; actually is impressive. Just sayin'....
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,023
Location
NYC
What no collaborative works? 🤣
I guess I could cover his tools in an overview video on my main channel.
Or, if we put up the shed up very quietly.... Put that on my ASMR channel. Hmmm.... instead of loud hammering of nails, we could just quietly duct tape the shed together. 🔦
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,394
Location
Northern New Jersey
IMO building a shed is a two man job.

One of the most challenging things is to level the ground, or to lie a foundation.
Using carboard tubes and concrete, and a laser level, or water level is a good start. If you don't have your foundation level, the prefab parts won't line up, and you'll have a nightmare on your hands.
Another method is the one that @Chauncey Gardiner used in his porch project. I particularly like his adjustable posts.

1694168222343.png
 
Last edited:

M@elstrom

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Messages
2,213
Location
Sunraysia, Australia
I guess I could cover his tools in an overview video on my main channel.
Or, if we put up the shed up very quietly.... Put that on my ASMR channel. Hmmm.... instead of loud hammering of nails, we could just quietly duct tape the shed together. 🔦

Indeed... the ASMR video genre really took off didn't it?

Duct tape is highly recommended by Red Green 🤣


images (2).jpeg
 
Last edited:

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
20,023
Location
NYC
Not with my channel! I've literally had folks stumble upon my ASMR channel. Stick around for awhile, watching my vids., and then telling me my ASMR channel is the best kept secret in the entire ASMR community; on YouTube! Yes, yes it is.

A dubious title, but I'll take it! That channel is a labor of Love where I can truly let my creativity fly! Heck, I don't even monitize my channels. And with most of my vids. on my ASMR channel being around 20 minutes, that's 20 minutes straight through of acting! Usually one-take! No edits, no mistakes. Also, I have access to an interior room inside a building. Fully closed off from the outside world. I literally don't have to apologize for the background noise.... because there isn't any! Ha ha!

Not even Gibi or any of the 1 Million+ Subscribers, ASMR content creators have that. Though I will say that Frivolous Fox (Lauren), and Glow (Sharon) are extremely caring and kind-hearted young women. No hyper-inflated egos with them. And, I love having gotten to know them; and their goof-ball sense of humors. Sometimes you encounter folks who are beautiful on the inside as well as the outside. Both of them truly deserve their success on YouTube. Gibi, not so much. She better hope and pray that Ben never realizes he could do better than her. Just sayin'....
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,426
Location
Dust in the Wind
When I did the metal shed I used metal stakes and mason string with a string line bubble level. I dug shallow bell shaped holes to set the blocks in. First I over dug 4" and set dry sakrete in them and leveled with that using a ruler. The old "batter board", which is a pipe laying technique. Measure from the string down (adding in the height of the block) to get the finished grade "invert" point.

(Some people just use a bag of sakrete for blocks. That works great over time since the sakrete will harden inside the bag over time.)

From there it was a quick set the blocks and make sure they were fairly level. I did however use a 1/4" to the foot slope front to back pitch to make sure if any water got in the building it didn't pond. (8' building meant 2" slope).
 

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
7,505
Location
Flushing, NY
One of the most challenging things is to level the ground, or to lie a foundation.
I laid this slab back in December:

P1080727.JPG


This was the shed I wanted to buy.

Unfortunately, an entire series of events conspired to delay this project. I had been ready to lay the slab back in 2019. I caught something which laid me low for over 2 months. By the time it passed, it was already December and too cold to do concrete outside. Then the pandemic hit. That shed I linked to had been $1,400 when I first chose it. The price went through the roof during the pandemic. I couldn't order it until I was ready to assemble it since I really had no place to store it. We also have to repair rotted wood in the garage roof before I put up any shed as the shed would block access to it. I've been waiting on my brother for that for a while. It's a two-person job, plus he has a van to get the wood. Things finally got back to normal enough to at least lay the slab last year. So now it's repair the garage roof, and wait until the price of that shed drops back to what it was pre-pandemic. Or try to find something else halfway decent which doesn't cost and arm and a leg. I know about the metal sheds for like $500. They're designed with such thin metal they're basically almost at the point of failure. Add a little snow on top, and they're done. What I thought would be a project which might have been done by late fall 2019 is still ongoing.

EDIT: Another option is to build the shed myself out of cinder blocks and use a prehung steel door. I haven't costed that option out yet. The nice part is I can build it at my own speed, while I'm taking care of my mother. I might lay one course of cinderblock, then not have time for the next one for a few days, etc.

The reason for the shed is to get all my late father's collections out of the basement so I can make it liveable again. After my brother retires he'll start selling the stuff off.
 
Last edited:

The Hawk

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 20, 2009
Messages
263
Location
Kentucky
Many years ago we bought a do it yourself shed. It was delivered and I realized there was no way I would be able to build it. I called a carpenter and he came out and gave me a quote of $200 to build it. It took him and his helper two entire days and they had to re-cut almost every piece of lumber. We had bought it from Lowe's and showed him the receipt. He ended up contacting Lowe's and charged them another $200, which he said they paid. Never again will I try something like that.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,394
Location
Northern New Jersey
It was about 14 years ago, that my wife and daughter went halfs on a swing set for the kids.
This picture is similar to what they got, but without the roofs.

1694194363797.png


Assembly time was marketed at 17 hours, or 28 hours, I forget. But whatever it was, they LIED!
I spent a couple of hours setting footings so it would be level.
My daughter, wife and I spent a couple of hours, sorting out the pile of wood, and pieces, so that was 3-6 man hours.
And then my brother, a Union Carpenter, and I (both are good with tools), using battery powered drill drivers, did the actual assembly. We figured, that with power tools, we'd beat the clock. Wrong!!!

IIRC, it took us about 40 man hours.
 
Top