dont ever move to a big city

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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nah just never ever ever move or move a lot .but my main point is ima idiot and smell like used butter
 

bykfixer

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I lived in a big city for a time. Traffic snarls were ridiculous, pollution was bad, it was still loud at 2am people were angry everywhere, protestors everywhere ranting and raving about stuff that doesn't matter, the pizza sucked, it was the closest thing to bad pizza I've ever encountered, doctors over booked, lots of stop signs were at the bottom of hills so in snow there'd be big wrecks. If you like chaos and strife it was a great place.

They did have a really good college radio station though so I got to hear good rock and roll instead of the same 3 Bob Segar songs over and over.

My first morning there I was at a McDrive-thru and a robber came bursting out of the place being shot at by the McManager. 😱 I said to my hamster Harry (who was in the passenger seat running on his wheel) "Toto, we aint in Kansas no more".
 

Monocrom

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nah just never ever ever move or move a lot .but my main point is ima idiot and smell like used butter
Hot water and Dial soap are your friends.
As far as moving goes, that $#&% is expensive!
Especially if you head out of state.
That's a better reason not to move too often.
 

Monocrom

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My first morning there I was at a McDrive-thru and a robber came bursting out of the place being shot at by the McManager. 😱 I said to my hamster Harry (who was in the passenger seat running on his wheel) "Toto, we aint in Kansas no more".
Welcome to McDonald's. Keep your hands where I can see them!!! :LOL:
 

rwolfenstein

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Mar 29, 2017
Messages
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I lived in a big city for a time. Traffic snarls were ridiculous, pollution was bad, it was still loud at 2am people were angry everywhere, protestors everywhere ranting and raving about stuff that doesn't matter, the pizza sucked, it was the closest thing to bad pizza I've ever encountered, doctors over booked, lots of stop signs were at the bottom of hills so in snow there'd be big wrecks. If you like chaos and strife it was a great place.

They did have a really good college radio station though so I got to hear good rock and roll instead of the same 3 Bob Segar songs over and over.

My first morning there I was at a McDrive-thru and a robber came bursting out of the place being shot at by the McManager. 😱 I said to my hamster Harry (who was in the passenger seat running on his wheel) "Toto, we aint in Kansas no more".
I liked the idea of living in the big city, be in walking distance of many restaurants and utilize public transit. Then I stayed with a family member who lived in the big city. Their bike always got stolen or parts off of it was stolen. We had to kick the local homeless off the porch almost daily and it was pretty common to have random people try to get into the house. (always a reminder to lock the doors when you are sitting on the couch watching a movie and some random guy lets himself in) I see the appeal, but having lived it, I would never recommend it.
 

bykfixer

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A long time ago some friends of mine bought their first house in a decent area of a big city. It had a front porch fixed up like a living room. They'd sit on the porch in the evenings.

One evening they went back inside grab another beer only to find someone had gone in through the back door and pilfered the place, stealing cash, jewelry, a tv, a computer other stuff and worse.....homies last beers.
 

rwolfenstein

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A long time ago some friends of mine bought their first house in a decent area of a big city. It had a front porch fixed up like a living room. They'd sit on the porch in the evenings.

One evening they went back inside grab another beer only to find someone had gone in through the back door and pilfered the place, stealing cash, jewelry, a tv, a computer other stuff and worse.....homies last beers.
Granted, I grew up in a town of about 10k people. I moved to a smaller town with 4500 people and then onward to a city with over 40k people. First thing I did, given the nature of my job, was to install a bunch of security cameras around the house. Do I have some problems here and there? Sure, but it wasn't as bad as the city with millions of people I stayed in for a short time period.
 

thermal guy

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II went to New York City once When I was 18-19. I remember getting there and seeing everything and was just beside myself. We went to the twin towers, the Empire State Building and saw many sites. I would Say hi or how you doing to people I passed or made eye contact with and no one i mean no one gave me the slightest response back. That told me everything I needed to know about big city life. No thank you.
 

jtr1962

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II went to New York City once When I was 18-19. I remember getting there and seeing everything and was just beside myself. We went to the twin towers, the Empire State Building and saw many sites. I would Say hi or how you doing to people I passed or made eye contact with and no one i mean no one gave me the slightest response back. That told me everything I needed to know about big city life. No thank you.
In all fairness probably most of them were workers either on lunch break, or going to/from work. I've had impromptu conversations on subways and buses. The key is to catch people when they're at least a semi-captive audience, not just rushing by getting wherever they're going. Also, the people in the outer boroughs are generally a bit more easy-going/friendly than most people you see in Manhattan.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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The HEART of the USA.
I like that scene in the film Crocodile Dundee, where Mick Dundee says something like, New Yorkers must be the friendliest people in the world, because they all want to live together. :crackup:
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Saw a video last week with a bicycle that was doing overnight 50 mph and if I recall motors was like 25000 watts it was a heavy moded sur Ron
 
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tech25

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I work in an adult and pediatric trauma center in NYC and in the last few years we are seeing so many more accidents, many serious ( brain bleeds and long bone fractures) due to E bikes/scooters.

parents don't realize how easy it is to remove the speed governors and the kids have no clue how invisible they are on the road. (Not to mention all those reckless drivers who don't follow any traffic rule)
 

Monocrom

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I work in an adult and pediatric trauma center in NYC and in the last few years we are seeing so many more accidents, many serious ( brain bleeds and long bone fractures) due to E bikes/scooters.

parents don't realize how easy it is to remove the speed governors and the kids have no clue how invisible they are on the road. (Not to mention all those reckless drivers who don't follow any traffic rule)
Oh, no I'm going to take exception to that last part. Do you know how many times I've had to swerve out of the way from reckless/suicidal teens on those frickin' e-Bikes and e-scooters? Countless times heading to my 3rd Shift job at night. I've almost side-swiped several parked cars over this past year alone making sure I don't hit these fools who NEVER obey traffic laws. Constantly fly past red lights without even literally pausing to see if there's on-coming traffic that has the right of way. This is on side streets where 25mph speed limits exist and are camera-enforced.

Mommy & Daddy happily buy them these things, stupidly thinking there's no difference between them and old-fashioned bicycles that require pedal-power. You know what they don't buy them? Helmets, elbow-pads, reflective vests. Some don't even bother getting a headlight installed on those things. They go outside to play, and being young and dumb just assume that drivers will automatically watch out for them, their dark colored "vehicle," and all their black clothes that make them look like modern-day ninjas! No-nothing, irresponsible, lazy excuses for parents who actually allow their Pride & Joy to ride at night. Again, no headlamp dressed as a ninja. Don't even bother telling their children to go upstairs and change into an outfit with bright colors so that at least drivers on the road will be able to see them from a bit of a distance.

Don't blame drivers, just because we don't end up being the ones injured in collisions with e-bikes and e-scooters. We're the ones who obey traffic laws. We're the ones who turn the lights on in our cars when driving at night. Blame the idiot parents who buy these things, give them to their kids, and just send them out there onto the streets with zero instructions and zero precautions.

I wouldn't be this upset if it wasn't for the fact that my mom has been comforting a young woman in our building for the last 2 weeks. The young woman being the driver of a car that struck an e-scooter teen who zipped right in front of her. Camera in her car shows she had the green light. Reckless teen wasn't hurt. Family tried to sue her until they learned she has a dash-mounted camera. But according to mom, this young woman is traumatized by the event. Has nightmares.

So don't blame drivers in NYC. We're not the problem. We get blamed for everything. Maybe if parents took their jobs as parents seriously, and maybe if the NYPD didn't turn a blind eye to everyone on an e-bike or e-scooter pretending that traffic laws don't apply to them; you'd see a lot less horrific trauma at your job.
 
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